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Compliments of . • • 

MET R0P0UTAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



HENRY H. SPBAGUE, Ch^n. 
HENRY P. WAUCOTT. 

1 ASHBURTON PLACE, 

BOSTON 



V/1LL1MW 



N . davenport, Secretary. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT . . . . 



. ... No. 57. 



FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board. 



January 1, 1905. 




BOSTON : 
WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 
1905. 



± 







u. 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 






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CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

I. Organization and Administration, 1 

(1) Board, Officers and Employes, 1 

(2) Offices and Buildings, , 4 

(3) Conveyancing, 5 

II. Water "Works, Construction 6 

(1) Wachusett Dam and Reservoir 6 

(a) Wachusett Dam, 6 

(6) Wachusett Reservoir, 8 

(c) Location, Construction and Discontinuance of Roads, 10 

(d) Relocation of the Central Massachusetts Railroad, 11 

(e) Clinton Catholic Cemetery, 11 

(2) Weston Aqueduct and Reservoir, 12 

(3) Clinton Sewerage and Filtration Works, 13 

(4) Pipe Laying and Venturi Meters 13 

(5) Improvement of Spot Pond Brook 13 

(6) Police Protection .14 

(7) Purchases and Takings of Land, 14 

(8) Claims and Settlements for Loss of Business 18 

(9) Claims and Settlements for Loss of Employment 18 

(10) Claims and Settlements for Depreciation of Real Estate, 19 

(11) Claims on Account of Diversion of Water, 19 

III. Water Works, Maintenance, .19 

(1) Operation of Works 20 

(2) Storage Reservoirs, 21 

(3) Distributing Reservoirs, 22 

(4) Aqueducts, 23 

(5) Pumping Stations, . . . . • 24 

(6) Pipe Lines and Pipe Yards, • 25 

(7) Clinton Sewerage and Filtration Works, 25 

(8) Sanitary Inspection and Regulations, 26 

(9) Marlborough Brook, 27 

IV. Water Works, Financial Statement, 28 

(1) Metropolitan Water Loan, Receipts and Assessments, 28 

(2) Expenditures for the Different Works, 31 

(3) Detailed Financial Statement, 34 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 34 

(&) Receipts, 40 

(c) Assets, 42 

(d) Liabilities, 42 

V. Sewerage Works, Construction, 43 

(1) North Metropolitan System, 44 

(2) South Metropolitan System, 44 

(3) Purchases and Takings of Land, 46 

VI. Sewerage Works, Maintenance, 47 

(1) North Metropolitan System, 47 

(2) South Metropolitan System, 48 

VII. Sewerage Works, Financial Statement, 49 

(1) Construction Loans and Receipts 49 

(a) North Metropolitan System 49 

(6) South Metropolitan System, 49 

(c) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund, 50 



h CONTENTS. 

\'il. Boworaga Works, Financial Btatement— Oonoludtd, paoi 

Animal Appropriations and KcceiptH 50 

(3) Aiinnul Assessments, 51 

(4) Expenditure! for the Different Works 52 

(5) Detailed Financial Statement, 53 

(«) Expenditure* and Disbursements, 53 

(b) Receipts 56 

(c) Asset*, 57 

((/) Liabilities 57 

VIII. Consumption of Water, 58 

IX. Measurement of Water supplied to Various Municipalities and Investigation of UnueceB- 

sary ami Improper Use or Waste, , 59 

X. Flectrolysis 60 

XI. Future Intension of the High-level Sewer to Brookline, Brighton and Newton, ... 61 

XII. Future Work 64 



Report of Chief Engineer, 66 

Organization, 66 

Force employed on Works, 68 

Arrangement of Report, 68 

Construction, 68 

Contracts, 68 

Reservoir Department 69 

North Dike, 70 

Relocation and Construction of Roads, 72 

Removal of Soil, 73 

Relocation of Railroads, 75 

Contracts, Wachusett Reservoir 76 

Improving the Wachusett Watershed, 81 

Forestry, 81 

Engineering, 82 

Dam and Aqueduct Department, 82 

Wachusett Dam, .83 

South Dike, 92 

Clinton Sewerage Settling Basins, 94 

Relocation of the Central Massachusetts Railroad 95 

Roads and Bridges, 96 

Mortar Experiments, 96 

Cement Tests 96 

Weston Aqueduct Department, 97 

Contracts, 97 

Additional Work on Aqueduct and Reservoir, 98 

Quantity and Cost of Work done in constructing Aqueduct, Reservoir and Supply 

Pipe Line 99 

Distribution Department 102 

Office Force 102 

Accidents, 103 

Maintenance, 104 

Organization of Maintenance Force 104 

Rainfall and Yield 105 

Storage Reservoirs 105 

Sources from which Water has been taken . Ill 

Aqueducts, Ill 

Wachusett, Ill 

Sudbury 112 

Cochituate, 114 

Weston, 114 

Pumping Stations 114 

Chestnut Hill High Service, H6 

Chestnut Hill Low Service, 116 

Spot Pond 117 

West Roxbury, 117 

Arlington, 118 



CONTENTS. v 

Report of Chief Engineer — Concluded. 

Maintenance — Concluded. page 

Consumption of Water, 119 

Quality of Water 122 

Biological Laboratory, . 123 

Sanitary Inspection, . . . 124 

Drainage of Swamps, 128 

Distributing Reservoirs, 128 

Weston Reservoir, 129 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 129 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 129 

Forbes Hill Reservoir and Standpipe, 129 

Spot Pond, 130 

Mystic Reservoir, ., 130 

Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs 131 

Arlington Standpipe, 131 

Mystic Lake, 131 

Chelsea Reservoir, 131 

Pipe Lines 132 

Venturi Meters , . 133 

Electrolysis 134 

Clinton Sewerage, 139 



Report of Engineer of Sewerage Works, . 143 

Organization, 143 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, 144 

Areas and Populations, 144 

Metropolitan Sewers, ' 145 

Sewers purchased and constructed, and their Connections, 145 

Cost of Construction 146 

Construction and Additions during the Year, 146 

Tables of Areas, Populations, Sewer Mileage, etc., 147 

Pumping Stations and Pumpage, 147 

Construction on North Metropolitan System 148 

Extension to Revere, 148 

Section 61, Chelsea 148 

Section 62, Chelsea, . 149 

Mill Creek Crossing, Chelsea and Revere 150 

Extension to Belmont 150 

Section 63, Cambridge, . 150 

Construction on South Metropolitan System, 151 

High-level Sewer, 151 

Section 43, Quincy and Hull, 152 

Section 44, Quincy, 152 

Sections 45, 46 and 47, Quincy 153 

Sections 48 to 75, inclusive, '..... 154 

Section 76, Roxbury, 154 

Section 77, Roxbury, 154 

Connection of Section 78 with Charles River Valley Sewer, Roxbury, .... 156 

Maintenance, 156 

Scope of Work and Force employed, 156 

North Metropolitan System (Table) 157 

South Metropolitan System (Table), 158 

Whole Metropolitan System (Table) 159 

Capacity and Results, 160 

North Metropolitan System, 160 

Deer Island Pumping Station, 160 

East Boston Pumping Station, 161 

Charlestown Pumping Station 162 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station, 163 

South Metropolitan System, 164 

Quincy Pumping Station, 164 

Ward Street Pumping Station, 165 



vi CONTENTS. 

Report of Engineer of Bewerage Works— Concluded. 

Maintenance — Comtu<l,<l . rAGB 

Coot of Pumping . 165 

Doer Island Pumping Station, 165 

East Boston Pumping Station 166 

fliarlestown Pumping Station 166 

Alewlfe Brook Pumping Station, 166 

Qulncy Pumping Station 166 

Material Intercepted at the Screens, 167 

Care of Special Structures, 167 

Report on Future Extension of Metropolitan Sewer into the Higher Territory of Brookline, 

Brighton and Newton, 168 



Appendix No. 1. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan "Water Works made and pending during 

the Year 1904 200 

Appendix No. 2. — Cement Tests made on the Metropolitan Water Works 205 

Appendix No. 3. — Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, . . 210 

Table No. 1. — Monthly Rainfall at Various Places on the Metropolitan Water Works in 1904, 210 

Table No. 2. — Rainfall at Jefferson, Mass., in 1904 211 

Table No. 3. — Rainfall at Framingham, Mass., in 1904, 212 

Table No. 4. — Rainfall at Chestnut Hill Reservoir In 1904 213 

Table No. 5. — Rainfall on the Wachusett Watershed, 1897 to 1904, 215 

Table No. 6. — Rainfall on the Sudbury Watershed, 1875 to 1904, 216 

Table No. 7. — Yield of the Wachusett Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile from 

1897 to 1904 217 

Table No. 8. — Yield of the Sudbury Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile from 

1875 to 1904 218 

Table No. 9. — Wachusett System, — Statistics cf Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 1904, 221 

Table No. 10. — Sudbury System, — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 1904, 222 

Table No. 1 1 . — Cochituate System, — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 1904, 223 
Table No. 12. — Elevations of Water Surfaces of Reservoirs above Boston City Base at the 

Beginning of Each Month, • . 224 

Table No. 13. — Average Daily Quantity of Water Flowing through Aqueducts in 1904, by 

Months, 225 

Table No. 14. — Statement of Operations of Engines Nos. 1 and 2 at Chestnut Hill High-service 

Pumping Station for the Year 1904 226 

Table No. 15. — Statement of Operations of Engine No. 3 at Chestnut Hill High-service Pump- 
ing Station for the Year 1904, 227 

Table No. 16. — Statement of Operations of Engine No. 4 at Chestnut Hill High-service Pump- 
ing Station for the Year 1904 ■ . . 228 

Table No. 17. — Statement of Operations of Engines Nos. 5, 6 and 7 at Chestnut Hill Low-ser- 
vice Pumping Station for the Year 1904 229 

Table No. 18. — Statement of Operations of Engine No. 9 at Spot Pond Pumping Station for the 

Year 1904 230 

Table No. 19. — Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns supplied Wholly 

or in Part by the Metropolitan Water Works, 231 

Table No. 20. — Average Daily Consumption of Water from the Low-service System, . . 231 
Table No. 21. — Average Daily Consumption of Water from the High-service and Extra High- 
service Systems, 232 

Table No. 22. — Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns supplied from the 

Metropolitan Water Works, as measured by Venturi Meters, 1904, . . 233 
Table No. 23. — Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan Water District as constituted De- 
cember 31, 1904, the Town of Swampscott and a Small Section of the Town 

of Saugus, from 1893 to 1904 236 

Table No. 24. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton, . 237 

Table No. 25. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury Reservoir 238 

Table No. 26. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, Stoneham 239 

Table No. 27. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochituate, 240 

Table No. 28. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet at the State House, Boston, . 241 
Table No. 29. — Averages of Examinations of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works, 1904, 242 

Table No. 30. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, from 1892 to 1904, . 24a 



CONTENTS. vii 

Appendix No. 3— Concluded. page 

Table No. 31. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, 1904, . 243 
Table No. 32. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, 

1904 244 

Table No. 33. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan Water Works, 

1904, 245 

Table No. 34. — Table showing Length of Main Lines of Water Pipes and Connections owued 

and operated by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, and Number 

of Valves set in Same, 246 

Table No. 35. — Statement of Cast-iron Hydrant, Blow-off and Drain Pipes laid to January 1, 

1905, owned and operated by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, . 246 
Table No. 36. — Length of Water Pipes, Four Inches in Diameter and Larger, in the Several 

Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, . . . 247 
Table No. 37. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities and 

Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, 248 

Table No. 38. — Average Maximum and Minimum Monthly Heights, in Feet, above Boston City 

Base, to which Water rose, at Different Stations on the Metropolitan Water 

Works, 249 

Appendix No. 4. — Water Works Statistics for the Year 1904, 251 

Appendix No. 5. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, made and pending 

during the Year 1904, 254 

Appendix No. 6. — Legislation of the Year 1904 affecting the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 

Board, 259 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Weston Reservoir — View from Ash Street looking towards Screen Chamber at Outlet, Frontispiece. 

Wachusett Dam and Power and Gate House at End of 1904, '6 

Wachusett Reservoir — Arch Bridge over New Channel at West Boylston, 10 

Weston Aqueduct — Siphon Chambers above Happy Hollow in Wayland, 12 

Ward Street Pumping Station, 44 

High-level Sewer — Nut Island and Screen Chamber at End of 1904, . 46 

Wachusett Reservoir — West Boylston Manufacturing Company Mills Site before Beginning of 

Work and after Stripping of Reservoir and Construction of Arch and Embankment, . . 74 
Wachusett Reservoir — Arch Bridge over the New Channel, and Highway Embankment across 

Reservoir at West Boylston, 80 

Highway Bridge over the Waste Channel of the Wachusett Reservoir, 88 

Screen Chamber at Outlet of Weston Reservoir, 102 

12-inch Pipe in Washington Street in Lynn, pitted by Electrolysis (Replaced), .... 136 

12-inch Pipe in Washington Street in Lynn, pitted by Electrolysis (Replaced), .... 138 

Map showing Metropolitan Sewerage District, 142 

Ward Street Pumping Station — Vertical Section and Ground Plan, 154 

Pumping Engine (showing both Engine and Pumps) at Ward Street Pumping Station, . . . 156 
Map showing South Metropolitan System with Extension of High-level Sewer above Jamaica 

Plain 198 



Metropolitan Watee and Seweeage Boaed. 



To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts in General Court assembled. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, established under 
the provisions of chapter 168 of the Acts of the year 1901, has 
already presented to your Honorable Body an abstract of the account 
of its doings, receipts, expenditures, disbursements, assets and lia- 
bilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1904, and now 
presents a detailed statement of the operations for the year, being its 

FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

made since the consolidation of the Metropolitan Water Board and 
the Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners on March 20, 
1901. 

I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 

(1) Board, Officers and Employes . 

The membership of the Board has continued the same as in the 
preceding year: Henry H. Sprague, chairman, Henry P. Walcott, 
M.D., and James A. Bailey, Jr. William N. Davenport has con- 
tinued as secretary and executive officer of the Board, and Alfred 
F. Bridgman as auditor and purchasing agent. 

The administrative office force, during the early part of the past 
year, consisted, in addition, of the same number oi employes as in 
the preceding year ; but during the year considerable reduction has 
been made, and the force now comprises a book-keeper, an assistant 
book-keeper, an assistant in auditing, a paymaster, one general 
clerk, four stenographers, a telephone operator, one messenger, and 
a janitor with two assistants, one of whom acts as watchman. It 
has been determined in the coming year to place the auditing de- 
partment under the general supervision of the secretary, the present 
auditor acting as purchasing agent. 



l> METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Alfred 0. Vinton continued as conveyancer during the first half 
of the year, a position which he had filled efficiently since the organ- 
ization of the Water Board. Owing to the diminution in the amount 
of conveyancing, he severed his connection with the Board on duly 
1, L904, and since that date George D. Bigelow, who had acted as 
assistant conveyancer, has been in charge, assisted by Miss Alline 
E. Marev, title examiner, and by one stenographer. 

Frederic 1\ Stearns has continued as Chief Engineer of the Board, 
with special charge of the Water Works. Joseph P. Davis and 
Uiram F. Mills are retained to act as consulting engineers when 
their services are required. 

The various departments of the Water Works have been, subject 
to the Chief Engineer, in charge of the following ; Dexter Brackett, 
Engineer of the Distribution Department, and, since March 10, also 
in charge of the Sudbury Department ; Thomas F. Richardson, En- 
gineer of the Dam and Aqueduct Department; Charles E. Wells, 
Engineer of the Reservoir Department ; Frank T. Daniels, Principal 
Office Assistant. Horace Ropes was Engineer of the Weston Aque- 
duct Department until May 25, when this department was abolished 
and the duties were transferred to the Distribution Department. 

The engineering force employed on the Water Works, both in 
construction and maintenance, has, upon the average during the 
year, comprised, in addition, 10 division engineers, 16 assistant 
engineers, and others in various engineering capacities and as 
sanitary inspectors, clerks, stenographers and messengers, to the 
number of 101, — in all, 127. The maximum engineering force 
employed at any one time during the year on construction and 
maintenance was 148. 

There have also been employed inspectors, other than engineering 
inspectors, to the maximum number of 11. Day-labor forces under 
the general supervision of the engineers and the immediate direction 
of foremen, varying in numbers from time to time, have been em- 
ployed in pipe laying, in general improvements and repairs, and in 
minor operations. 

In addition, a maintenance force, numbering, upon the average 
during the year, 202, has been required at the pumping stations and 
upon the reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines and other works. This 
force at the end of the year numbered 216, and was distributed 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 3 

among the various departments as follows : Sudbury and Distribu- 
tion Departments, 203 ; Dam and Aqueduct Department, 12 ; Res- 
ervoir Department, 1. 

The maximum number of men employed upon contracts by the 
various contractors upon the Water Works during the year was for 
the week ending June 11, when the number amounted to 1,627. 

William M. Brown, Engineer of the Sewerage Works, has been 
in charge of both construction and maintenance upon these works. 

He was assisted during the larger part of the year by 2 division 
engineers who were in charge of the various sections of sewer con- 
struction, 1 division engineer in charge of drafting room and records, 
6 assistant engineers, 6 inspectors, and 22 others, who were em- 
ployed in various engineering capacities, and as clerk, stenographer 
and messenger in the department. The maximum engineering force 
employed at any one time during the year on construction and 
maintenance of the Sewerage Works was 37. 

Day-labor forces, under the general supervision of the engineers 
and the immediate direction of foremen, have been employed on the 
High-level Sewer in grading the roads and grounds about the Ward 
Street pumping station, in connecting the Charles River valley 
sewer with the High-level Sewer, and in grading and filling on Nut 
Island, in Quincy. On the North Metropolitan System, day-labor 
forces have been employed in the construction of parts of sections 
61 and 62 of the Revere extension in Chelsea and in minor work. 

The maximum number of men employed upon contracts by the 
various contractors and upon day-labor construction upon the Sew- 
erage Works during the year was for the week ending July 24, 
when the number amounted to 302. 

Upon the completion of construction on both the North and South 
Metropolitan systems, the engineering force was reduced to 9, all 
of whom are now employed in maintenance of the works. 

The regular maintenance force required for the operation of the 
pumping stations, the care and inspection of the sewers, and for 
other parts of the Sewerage Works, exclusive of engineers and day- 
labor construction forces before enumerated, has upon the average 
numbered 90. The opening of the High-level Sewer and putting 
into operation of the Ward Street pumping station and Nut Island 
screen-house late in the year necessitated an increase in the force, 



1 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc 

which at the end ol the year cumbered L25, of whom the engineer 
in charge and 9 assistants and draftsmen were engaged in general 
upon the works, and of the remainder, 72 were employed upon the 
North System and l."> upon the South System. 

(2) Offices and Buildings. 

The office of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board is in 
the buildings numbered 1 and 3 Ashburton Place, at the corner of 
Somerset Street, in which are also located the offices of the secretary 
and auditor and the conveyancer, and the main engineering offices 
of both the Water Works and the Sewerage Works. 

The headquarters of the Wachusett Reservoir and Wachusett 
Dam and Aqueduct departments of the Water Works have been 
maintained in the office building in Clinton. Branch offices of .the 
Reservoir Department have been maintained, two in West Boylston 
and one in Oakdale. A branch office of the Dam and Aqueduct 
Department has been maintained at the Wachusett Dam. The main 
office of the Weston Aqueduct Department in Saxonville was dis- 
continued on June 30, and the branch office located in Wayland was 
discontinued on February 29, and that in Weston on July 16. 
Headquarters of the Distribution Department have been maintained 
in the central office in Boston. For the Sudbury Department an 
office has been maintained at South Framingham. Branch head- 
quarters of the maintenance force of the Water Works in the north- 
ern part of the District have been in buildings in the Glenwood pipe 
yard in Medford, where there are offices, shops, store rooms and 
stables ; and the maintenance force for the southern part of the Dis- 
trict has headquarters in buildings at the Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

Maintenance in connection with the Water Works has embraced 
the care and operation of the Chestnut Hill high-service and low- 
service pumping stations ; the Spot Pond, Arlington and W r est 
Roxbury pumping stations ; the Clinton sewerage pumping station 
at Clinton : the Pegan Brook pumping station at Natick ; the Mystic 
pumping station at Medford, not now in active operation ; the Wa- 
chusett Reservoir ; Lake Cochituate ; the Sudbury Reservoir and the 
various smaller reservoirs in the Sudbury watershed ; Spot Pond, 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir and the smaller distributing reservoirs in 
different portions of the District ; the Cochituate. Sudbury, Wa- 
chusett and Weston aqueducts ; as well as the various gate-houses r 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 5 

siphon and terminal chambers and other structures connected with 
the several reservoirs and aqueducts, dwellings for attendants, and 
various other buildings for operating purposes. 

There were maintained, in connection with the construction of 
the Sewerage Works, branch engineering offices at Hough's Neck 
and Roxbury ; an office for a portion of the year at Chelsea; and, 
in addition, seven portable booths were in use along the line of the 
work. For the maintenance of the Sewerage Works there are oper- 
ated the Deer Island, East Boston, Charlestown, Alewife Brook, 
Ward Street and Quincy pumping stations, the Nut Island screen- 
house, the North Metropolitan Sewer and its extensions, and the 
Charles River valley, Neponset valley and High-level sewers. 
Branch headquarters of the maintenance and repair forces of the 
Sewerage Works are maintained at the East Boston and Ward Street 
pumping stations and at the stockyard at Hough's Neck. 

(3) Conveyancing. 

During the earlier portion of the year many claims for damages 
to real estate were settled, so that a large amount of conveyancing 
work was required in the way of examining the records, bringing 
up to date the titles at the registry of deeds, and the preparation 
and drafting of deeds and other necessary instruments. 

The total number of cases settled during the year was 73, of which 
68 were on account of Water Works, and affected 734.345 acres of 
land, and 5 on account of Sewerage Works, affecting 1.121 acres. 

In addition, examinations of titles and the preparation of papers 
were required on account of various questions affecting lands which 
had been acquired from the city of Boston, and of various other 
claims which arose with reference to lands of the Commonwealth. 
The number of titles, therefore, which have been actually examined, 
and the questions relating thereto which required the preparation of 
various instruments, were much greater than the number above in- 
dicated. 

In addition, also, there have been drafted 3 instruments of takings, 
embracing 127.50 acres, 2 on account of the Water Works and 1 on 
account of the Sewerage Works ; and 13 deeds of lands and releases 
of rights in lands have been called for, and many papers in the na- 
ture of leases, licenses and forms of contract have been drafted. 

Besides the work that has been done especially for the Board, 



METROPOLITAN WATEK [Pub. Doc. 

main reports on titles have been called for by the Attorney-General 

for use in the preparation <>f suits d\u\ for the information of the 
Attorney-! reneral's I department. 

The hearings which have been had in the suits of the cities of Mai- 
den, Medford and Melrose against the Commonwealth, on account 
of the taking oi' Spot Pond and the various lands adjoining and con- 
tiguous thereto, have involved protracted examinations of records 
and reports and opinions upon titles. Investigation of the titles and 
history of the lands covered by Spot Pond, and the adjacent lands 
ased in connection therewith, has extended from the beginning of 
legislative grants and registry records down to the present date ; and 
this examination has required not only investigations at the registry 
of deeds, but also in the Massachusetts Archives, the histories of the 
various cities and the genealogies of the early settlers. 

A detailed statement of the various takings and settlements is 
given hereafter. 

II. WATER WORKS — CONSTRUCTION. 

The amount expended for construction, including real estate ac- 
quired and payment of claims, on account of the Water Works 
during the year 1904, was $2,174,498.19. Of this amount, $1,- 
506,803.38 was expended on account of the Wachusett Dam and 
Reservoir; $216,740.74 on account of the Weston Aqueduct and 
Reservoir ; $40,554.03 for the improvement of the Wachusett water- 
shed ; $39,481.28 for diversion of water; $327,527.62 on account 
of the taking of Spot Pond ; and the remainder, $43,391.14, upon 
various other operations on the works. The total amount expended 
for construction since the beginning of the works in the year 1895 
has been $38,388,255. 7C>. 

(1) Wachusett Dam and Reservoir. 

(a) Wachusett Dam. 

The work upon the Wachusett Dam during the past year has 
included not only the carrying up in height of the main structure, 
but also the continuation of the excavations and building into the 
banks at each end of the dam, so that the ends as well as the 
foundations shall be embedded in the rock. At the end of the pre- 
ceding year the masonry had reached an average elevation of 345 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 7 

feet, and during the year 1904 an average elevation has been reached 
of 396 feet, above the Boston City Base, — an elevation which is 130 
feet above the original river bed, and 188 feet above the lowest 
point of the foundation. This average elevation is 1 foot above the 
full-reservoir level, and there consequently remain, upon an aver- 
age, but 19 feet more in height to be added. 

The length of the dam has been extended from 739 feet to 1,024 
feet, exclusive of the waste-weir, which is 452 feet in length. 
During the year 59,900 cubic yards of earth and 36,810 cubic yards 
of rock have been excavated. The stone masonry has amounted to 
82,333 cubic yards. There have been used in the work during the 
year 16,561 barrels of Portland cement and 61,739 barrels of nat- 
ural cement. 

The abutment, so called, at the easterly end of the dam near 
Boylston Street, has been in like manner carried up, and the bastion 
at the westerly end, which divides the dam from the waste-weir, 
has been built nearly to the proper height. The most of the 
masonry work upon the waste- weir has been completed, and all but 
a small portion of the waste channel, which extends along the ledge 
from the weir to the river below the dam, a distance of about 1,240 
feet, has been excavated and made ready for use. A granite arch 
bridge about 131 feet long, and having a span of 35 feet 6 inches, 
has been constructed across the lower end of the channel, which 
will afford access to the dam on the westerly side of the river. 

The substructure, containing the gates and valves for the lower 
gate-chamber, was built in the preceding year, but during the past 
year the superstructure has been erected. This is a building 104 
feet 6 inches long, 74 feet wide, and having a height of about 59 
feet above the ground. The greater part of the interior is made up 
of one large room, in which will be installed the necessary machin- 
ery for the production of power. There are in addition several 
smaller rooms, which will be used for the various purposes needed 
in connection with the operation of the works. The exterior walls 
are from the same stone quarry from which the ashlar stone for the 
dam has been obtained. 

The upper gate-chamber is built within the main structure of the 
dam itself, the water being introduced at ports or openings in the 
walls, and conveyed through sluice-gates by 48-inch pipes through 
the structure of the dam. 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Much work has been accomplished in the grading of the banks 
along the river below the dam, and in depositing soil both upon the 
banks and the grounds at the foot of the dam and around the pool. 
The foundations have also been laid for the various drives and paths 
Leading to the dam. 

The work upon (he dam has so far advanced thai there seems but 
little doubt that it may bo completed during the coming year. 

(6) Wachusett Reservoir. 

The building of the Wachusett Reservoir has progressed favorably 
during the past year. A total of 1,115,341 cubic yards of soil was 
removed from the bed of the reservoir, and (521 acres of land were 
stripped. It was estimated that in all, the soil was to be removed 
from 4,200 acres to the extent of about 6,900,000 cubic yards, and 
there have been excavated since the beginning of the w r ork to the 
present date 6,760,405 cubic yards of soil from 3,857 acres. Of 
the total amount of soil, about 98 per cent, has been removed, and 
there remain to be stripped about 343 acres. 

A large amount of the soil which has been removed, as in previous 
years, has been carried and deposited in the embankment of the 
North Dike ; but a larger portion has been deposited at different 
places on the margin of the reservoir, for the purpose of avoiding 
shallow flowage, and also considerable amounts of soil have been 
used for the building of the South Dike and for highway embank- 
ments. The larger amount of the stripping done has been performed 
near the upper end of the reservoir in West Boylston, but the soil 
has also been removed from considerable tracts in Boylston as well 
as in Clinton and Sterling. 

As arrangements have been made by which it may be possible 
to flow the reservoir during the early part of the present year to 
elevation 375, the grass and weeds which have grown in the area 
already cleared have been removed and burned, and a final cleaning 
has been made of the reservoir bottom to the elevation named. The 
number of acres thus cleared and made ready for flowing is estimated 
to be about 3,681. 

Additional soil for the completion of the North Dike has been 
deposited during the year, and the placing of riprap on the slopes 
toward the reservoir has been completed. The dike has an entire 
length of 11,100 feet. More than 5,700,000 cubic yards of mate- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 9 

rial have been used in the construction of the dike, and 139,000 
cubic yards ot riprap have been laid upon the water slopes. The 
cost of the dike has been substantially $750,000. 

The South Dike has been entirely constructed during the year, 
except a portion of the riprapping. This dike has a length of about 
2,925 feet, and has been constructed in a manner similar to that in 
which the North Dike was built. The soil removed from the reser- 
voir has been placed to form the dike, the cut-off trench has been 
excavated and refilled with compacted material, and the water slopes 
have been riprapped in part. The cut-off trench was excavated to 
a maximum depth of 28.5 feet. The material used in the construc- 
tion of the South Dike has amounted to 418,904 cubic yards of 
earth, soil and rock, and 7,687 cubic yards of riprap. 

The number of buildings in West Boylston removed from the res- 
ervoir site during the year was 12, which embraced 2 churches, 6 
dwellings, 2 barns, a hall and a store. The total number of build- 
ings removed prior to the year was 259. In the town of Boylston 
there were removed 8 dwelling houses, a barn and a schoolhouse, 
— a total of 10 buildings. A few more buildings are still to be 
removed, but the work of demolition has been nearly completed. 

The two nurseries, one upon the north side and the other upon 
the south side of the reservoir, have been maintained. These nurs- 
eries contain upwards of 700,000 seedlings and plants. The larger 
number of these are white pines and arbor vitae, but there are many 
sugar maples, spruces and Scotch pines and smaller numbers of 
hemlocks, tamaracks and larches. About 200 acres upon the margin 
of the reservoir have been planted with seedlings grown in the nurs- 
eries, and much improvement has been made by the planting along 
the interior roads about the reservoir and by the cutting out of dead 
and undesirable trees. 

The bodies which had been buried in the old Beaman Cemetery 
in West Boylston have been removed to a new burial lot adjoining 
the West Boylston Cemetery. The 65 bodies found were removed, 
with the respective monuments, headstones and footstones, and 
properly deposited in the new burial ground. The ground occu- 
pied by the burial lot was purchased for the purpose. The lot was 
graded and seeded and a substantial wall built to enclose it, and a 
gravel drive leading to it was constructed. 



10 METROPOLITAN WATKK [Pub. Doc. 

(c) Location, Construction and Discontinuance of Roads, 

An important feature of the work of the past year has been the 
building of the embankment across the upper end of the reservoir in 
West Boylston in continuation ol Worcester Street. This embank- 
ment has in places a height of 64 feet, and a width of 4^ feet at the 
top and 300 feet at the bottom. Instead of building a masonry 
bridge with its abutments at the original channel of the river, it was 
determined to divert the river to the northerly side of the reservoir 
and to excavate a channel through the rock ledge, and by this means 
the larger part of the work of building abutments was avoided. A 
granite bridge has been extended across this channel, having a span 
of 47.f) feet, the top of the span being at a height of 60 feet above 
the bed of the channel. The sides of the embankment have been 
covered with paving. This work has been completed, and the road 
across the reservoir has been opened to public travel. 

The new road from West Boylston has been continued and con- 
structed from Pleasant Street through the village of Oakdale and as 
far as the new location of Holden Street. A single-arch granite 
bridge was built at the crossing of the Stillwater River, and a three- 
arch granite bridge has been constructed where the crossing is made 
of the Quinepoxet River. Overhead bridges have been built at the 
two crossings over the Boston & Maine Railroad. Holden Street 
has also been relocated and substantially reconstructed so as to per- 
mit public travel. The new construction of roads at Oakdale has 
done away with all grade crossings. 

There have been no new locations of highways. 

During the year a portion of North Main Street extending north- 
easterly from a point near East Main Street to Pleasant Street has 
been discontinued, and also the southwesterly part of Pleasant Street 
between the new highway and North Main Street, all in Oakdale. 
A small portion also of the old location of the Central Massachu- 
setts Division of the Boston & Maine Railroad in Oakdale has been 
discontinued. 

The following is a list of the roads which have been discontinued 
during the year on account of the work of construction of the 
Wachusett Reservoir : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



11 



List of Roads discontinued during the Year 1904. 

[Including a part of the Central Massachusetts Railroad location, being No. 24.] 



No. 


Location. 


• Description. 


Date of 
Discontinu- 
ance. 


24 
25 


West Boylston, Oak- 
dale Village. 

West Boylston, Oak- 
dale Village. 


That part of the old location of the Central Massachu- 
setts Division of the Boston & Maine Railroad which 
extends easterly from the new location of said railroad, 
near the new highway, to that part of the old location 
heretofore discontinued, near the Worcester. Nashua 
and Portland Division of the Boston & Maine Railroad. 

(1) That part of North Main 8treet which lies between 
portions of said street heretofore discontinued, extend- 
ing northeasterly from a point near East Main Street 
to Pleasant Street. 

(2) The southwesterly part of Pleasant Street, extending 
southwesterly between the new highway and North 
Main Street. 


Feb. 20, 1904. 
Oct. 15, 1904. 



(d) Relocation of the Central Massachusetts Railroad. 

A settlement has been effected with the Boston & Maine Railroad, 
by which the old track of the Central Massachusetts Railroad through 
the bed of the "Wachusett Reservoir has been surrendered to the 
Commonwealth ; the interchange of lands required for the purposes 
of the relocation and the adjustment of the account between the 
railroad and the Commonwealth have been made. 

Although the substantial part of the work of relocation was ac- 
complished in the year 1903, some final work has been required 
during the past year, and some other subsidiary work has been 
necessary in connection with the relocation of the railroad. 

It was deemed necessary to reinforce to a considerable extent the 
two railroad bridges which cross the Stillwater and Quinepoxet 
rivers. The masonry generally was grouted ; the places opened 
were filled with mortar, and portions of the wingwalls had to be 
relaid. 

The relocation of the railroad and the operations in connection 
therewith have required an expenditure of $821,700.77. 

(e) Clinton Catholic Cemetery. 

A considerable balance remains due on account of the taking of 
the lands constituting the St. John's Catholic Cemetery Association 
in Clinton. In accordance with the tripartite agreement which was 
executed between the Board, the Roman Catholic Bishop of Spring- 
field and the St. John's Catholic Cemetery Association, incorporated 



12 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

for the purpose of holding the new cemetery lands which were 
acquired in Lancaster, the grounds were properly improved and all 
the bodies were transferred and reburied. 

The Board, at the completion of the work, notified the two parties 
that it stood ready to pay over the balance due in accordance with 
the agreement, and to convey the lands in Lancaster, to which it 
has held the title, to the St. John's Catholic Cemetery Association, 
upon the release to the Commonwealth of the old cemetery lot and 
of all claims for damages. No action, however, has been taken by 
either of the two parties toward effecting a final settlement. 

(2) Weston Aqueduct and Reservoir. 

The Weston Aqueduct and Reservoir were so far.completed during 
the year 1903 that water was first introduced from the terminal 
chamber into the Metropolitan Water District on one of the last 
days of that year. During the past year it has been necessary to 
uncover and clean a portion of the rocky bed of the reservoir, as 
this work could not be accomplished in the colder weather ; to grade 
and cover with loam a portion of the embankments ; and also along 
the larger part of the aqueduct to grade and seed the embankments, 
to build the fences and to set the stone bounds. Final work also 
was done upon the screen-chamber at the reservoir. 

Final payments upon contracts have been made, but some claims 
for allowances under the contracts have not yet been settled, and a 
few claims for land and other damages also remain to be adjusted. 

One siphon pipe required for the crossing of the Sudbury River 
and Happy Hollow valley in Way land has been laid, but ultimately 
three lines of these pipes will be required, as the demands of the 
District shall increase. 

The cost of the aqueduct, extending from the dam at the Sudbury 
Reservoir to the terminal chamber overlooking the Charles River at 
Weston, exclusive of the reservoir, will be about $2,500,000, which 
is about $200,000 per mile of the aqueduct proper. The cost of 
the reservoir, having an area of 66.6 acres and a capacity exceed- 
ing 200,000,000 gallons, is about $350,000, or about $1,720 per 
million gallons. The cost of both aqueduct and reservoir will, 
therefore, be about $2,850,000. 

The State Board of Health, in its report of 1895, estimated the 
cost of the aqueduct as then proposed at $3,226,000. This estimate, 
however, was for one having a capacity of 250,000,000 instead of 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOAED. 13 

300,000,000 gallons per day, and did not include an equalizing reser- 
voir. Although the present aqueduct has a capacity exceeding by 
one-fifth that formerly proposed and includes in addition the Weston 
Reservoir, the work as now constructed has been largely within the 
estimates made by the State Board of Health. 

(3) Clinton Sewerage and Filtration Works. 

An improvement has been effected during the past year in the 
filtration works which are used for the purification of the Clinton 
sewage. In connection with the filter-beds, which are located in 
the town of Lancaster, 8 separate settling basins have been con- 
structed, each about 320 feet long and 33 feet wide, and having a 
capacity of about 237,000 gallons. 

The basins are in general constructed upon the surface of the 
ground, so that the bottom may be to a considerable extent imper- 
vious to the passage of water. Each basin has an inlet and outlet 
structure of Portland cement concrete, with gates for controlling 
the flow of sewage in and out ; and they are so arranged that all or 
a part of the sewage can be passed through them, or that all can be 
delivered, as formerly, directly to the filter-beds. 

By means of these basins the more solid matter of the sewage will 
settle at the bottom, and, when the basin is emptied, can be speedily 
disposed of. 

(4) Pipe Laying and Venturi Meters. 

No construction has been carried on by the Distribution Depart- 
ment during the year except the placing of one Venturi meter. 
The engineer and his assistants in this department have been called 
upon to make record plans of work done in past years, and also to 
spend much time upon the preparation of plans, statistics and esti- 
mates in connection with the suit brought by the cities of Maiden, 
Medford and Melrose against the Commonwealth for damages on 
account of the taking of Spot Pond ; and a large increase in the 
work of maintenance was placed upon the department. 

(5) Improvement of Spot Pond Brook. 

In response to the special report made in January of the year 
1904, the Legislature of that year passed " An Act to provide for 
the improvement of Spot Pond Brook by the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board," which was approved on June 3, 1904, and 
constituted chapter 406 of the Acts of the year. 



14 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

This act provided for improving or changing the channel of Spot 
Pond Brook between Spot Pond in the town of Stoneham and tide- 
water in the city of Maiden, substantially in accordance with the 
plans and recommendations made in the report of the Board to the 
Genera] Court in the preoeding year. The act, however, provided 
that no work should he begun upon the improvement until commis- 
sioners, who might within three months after the passage of the act 
be appointed upon the petition either of the Board or of the city of 
Maiden or the eity of Melrose, had after hearing made award of the 
proportion in which the expenses of carrying out the improvement 
should be paid by the Metropolitan Water District and by the city 
of Maiden and the city of Melrose. The city of Melrose has made 
petition for the appointment of commissioners as provided in the 
act, but no hearing has yet been had thereon. 

( (5 ) Police Prot ection . 

Police protection has been afforded, in accordance with the re- 
quirements of the Metropolitan Water Act, in places where active 
construction has been carried on. The police officers have been ap- 
pointed by the various towns in which their services have been 
required, and they have been subject to the town authorities in the 
performance of their duties, but they have been paid for their ser- 
vices by the Board. 

For the Wachusett Reservoir district there have been employed 
18 officers : 8 (reduced to 3 in December) in the town of Clinton ; 3, 
1 of whom is mounted, (reduced to 1 in December) in the town of 
Boylston ; (5 (reduced to 5 in November and placed on half time in 
December) in the town of West Boylston ; and 1 mounted officer 
in Sterling. 

The construction of the Weston Aqueduct having been entirely 
completed, the 2 officers in Weston were discharged on February 
20, 1904. 

(7) Purchases and Takings of Land. 

Few lands were acquired by the Board during the past year, as 
substantially all the lands which are required for the general pur- 
poses of construction have now been either purchased or taken. 

There were two takings, however, in West Boylston, of land to 
be used on account of the Wachusett Reservoir, affecting an area of 
125.82 acres. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



15 



List of Takings for Metropolitan Water Works for the Year 1904. 



No. 



Location and Description. 



Former Owners. 



Recorded. 



Purpose of Taking. 



106 



107 



West Boylston and Holden (on 
Quinepoxet River, both sides of 
and including a street called River 
Street in Holden and Holden Street 
in West Boylston, and a small 
parcel north of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad, Central Massachusetts 
Division). Area, 102.96 acres in 
fee. 

West Boylston (southeast of Pleas- 
ant Street and north of land of the 
County of Worcester Truant 
School). Area, 22.86 acres in fee. 



Austin H. Warfield. 



Heirs of Charles M. 
Harris et al. 



1904. 

March 22. 



April 23. 



Wachusett Reservoir. 



Wachusett Reservoir. 



Settlement has been effected with the owners of all the lands 
taken or purchased by the Board for the Metropolitan Water Works 
since the beginning of operations, except for about 127.21 acres, aside 
from Spot Pond and the contiguous lands and the works of the cities 
of Maiden, Medford and Melrose, payments for which, amounting to 
$317,820.68, have been made on account. The Spot Pond suits are 
now pending before a commission. In nearly all cases affecting 
private lands purchases have preceded the takings. 

Settlements under purchases and takings of land, for all purposes 
of the Water Works, have been effected in the past year in 47 cases, 
and for an aggregate of 302.005 acres, with the buildings thereon. 
The sums paid in these settlements have amounted to $144,404.16. 
In only 9 of these cases have the settlements been results of suits at 
law, and the total amount paid in the court settlements has been 
$42,928.90. 

Since the beginning of operations upon the Metropolitan Water 
Works, the number of settlements of this kind effected for the pur- 
poses of the Water Works, exclusive of the works of water supply 
acquired from the city of Boston, on January 1, 1898, has amounted 
to 818 ; and under them the Board has acquired rights, in fee or in 
easements, in 12,011.744 acres, or 18.77 square miles, for which an 
aggregate of $3,927,852.07 has been paid. Only 41 of these cases 
have been settled by suits at law, and the total amount paid under 
judgments of the court has been $136,930.23, or less than 4 per 
cent, of the whole. 



16 



METROPOLITA N WATER 



[Pub. Doc 



These purchases and hikings include lands taken in fee, with (he 
buildings (hereon, and water and other rights connected (herewith, 
and lands in which easements and other rights are taken; but they 
do not include settlements tor diversion of water, depreciation and 
other damages connected with lands not acquired, and in which no 
fee or easement has been taken. 



Summary of Land Settlements for Water Works to December 31, 1904. 





Foi 


. the Year 1904. 


From 


Beginning 


of Work. 


LOCATION. 


Area in 
Acres. 


Number 
of Settle- 
ments. 


Payments. 


Area in 
Acres. 


Number 
of Settle- 
ments. 


Payments. 


Waehtuett Reservoir 


( * 












Clinton, 


6.594 


^| 




1,286.804 


1 




Boylston, . 


26.090 






3,926.430 




- 


West Boylston, 


9.978 






1,637.648 






Sterling, . 


12.125 


y 23 


$43,645 21 


714.675 


l f 421 


$2,825,977 88 


Lancaster, 


. 






69.970 






Holden 


• 






167.000 






Berlin 


10.120 


J 


$43,645 21 


11.610 


J 




Total, . 


64.907 


23 


7,814.137 


421 


$2,825,977 88 


Improving Wachusett W 
shed. 


T ater- 












Holden 


84.300 


) 




84.300 


) 




West Boylston, 


64.430 


1 3 


$38,000 00 


64.430 


1 3 


$38,000 00 


Total 


148.730 


3 


$38,000 00 


148.730 


3 


$38,000 00 


Wachusett Aqueduc 


5. 








• 








1 




46.510 


1 












.380 






Northborough, 
Southborough, . 


7.270 


1 

1 


$1,875 00 


96.070 
89.580 


65 


$74,362 40 


Marlborough, . 


.660 


1 




51.740 


1 








J 




13.510 


! 




Total 


7.930 


1 


$1,875 00 


297.790 


65 


$74,362 40 


Sudbury Reservoir. 


\ 












Southborough, . 
Marlborough, . 


- 


I ■ 





1,995.580 
750.980 


J 150 


$658,318 75 


Total 


. 


- 


2,746.560 


150 


$658,318 75 



* Including payments on account of St. John's Catholic Cemetery. 
t Including settlements made by city of Boston. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



17 



Summary of Land Settlements for Water Works to December 31, 1904 

Concluded. 





For the Year 1904. 


From 


Beginning 


3F Work. 


LOCATION. 


Area in 
Acres. 


Number 
of Settle- 
ments. 


Payments. 


Area in 
Acres. 


Number 
of Settle- 
ments. 


Payments. 


Improving Sudbury Water- 
shed. 














Northborougb, 


23.470 


1 




171.400 


1 




Southborough, .... 


2.166 






4.826 






Westborougb, .... 


- 


> 2 


$3,023 06 


202.480 


> 37 


$16,522 16 


Ashland, 


- 






.630 






Marlborough, .... 


- 


J 




.740 


J 




Total, 


25.636 


2 


$3,023 06 


380.076 


37 


$16,522 16 


Clinton Sewerage System. 














Clinton, 


_ 


1 - 




5.320 


> 36 




Lancaster, .... 


- 


— 


129.860 


$37,794 40 




- 


- 


- 


135.180 


36 


$37,794 40 


Weston Aqueduct. 














Newton, . . . . 


.193 


1 




.321 


1 




Weston, 


17.240 






283.942 






Framingham, .... 


2.740 


> 16 


$56,851 69 


100.885 


y 76 


$166,856 40 


Wayland, 


34.525 






69.379 


1 




Southborough, .... 


- 


J 




.450 


J 




Total 


54.698 


16 


$56,851 69 


454.977 


76 


$166,856 40 


Distribution System. 














Boston 


.104 


1 




.804 


1 




Brookline, .... 


- 






.050 






Arlington, . . 


- 






1.800 






Maiden, 


_ 






.160 






Medford, 


- 


> 2 


$1,009 20 


2.390 


y 29 


$108,420 08 


Newton 


- 






.060 






Qulncy, 


- 






5.230 






Stoneham, .... 


- 


J 




20.850 


J 




Total 


.104 


2 


$1,009 20 


31.344 


29 


$108,420 08 


Improving Lake Cochituate. 














Natick 


- 


- 


- 


2.950 


1 


$1,600 00 


Total 


- 


- 


- 


2.950 


1 


$1,600 00 


Aggregates, 


302.005 


47 


$144,404 16 


12,011.744 


818 


$3,927,852 07 



18 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The settlements above enumerated do not take into account the 
lands acquired under the provisions of the Metropolitan Water Act, 
which required the Board to take the property held by the city of 
Boston for the purposes of water supply. The takings from the 
city under the Act, which were made on January 1, 1898, included 
the Cochituate works, all the Sudbury works except the then unfin- 
ished Sudbury Reservoir, the construction of which had been already 
assumed by the Board, the Chestnut Hill Reservoir and adjacent 
lands, and the Mystic works. The lands thus taken aggregated 
about 3,744 acres, and, in accordance with the agreement made 
with the city, a sum total of $12,531,000 was paid for the entire 
works then acquired. 

Including the property thus taken from the city of Boston, the 
settlements have numbered 819 ; and under them the Board has 
acquired lands in fee or in easements amounting to about 15,7">i> 
acres, or about 24.(3 square miles, at a total expenditure of $16,458,- 
852.07. More than 99 per cent, of the total amount involved in all 
these settlements has thus been paid in accordance with agreements 
made without the determination of a court. 

Under the similar provision of the Metropolitan Water Act, the 
Board was required to take, from the cities of Maiden, Medforcl and 
Melrose, Spot Pond and the adjacent lands, settlement for which 
has not yet been effected. 

(8) Claims and Settlements for Loss of Business. 

Additional claims for injury to business, caused by the carrying 
out of the Metropolitan "Water Act in the towns of West Boylston 
and Boylston and portions of the towns of Sterling and Clinton, 
have been filed during the year ending December 31, 1904, to the 
number of 2. Settlements of such claims have been effected during 
the year in 18 cases, under which the sum of $20,265 has been paid. 
Two claims have been disallowed. All of these claims except 1 
have been settled by the Board outside of the court. The number 
of claims of this class settled since the beginning of the Water Works 
has been 282, and the total sum paid on account of such claims has 
been $139,286. 

(9) Claims and Settlements for Loss of Employment. 
During the year ending December 31, 1904, 6 claims for loss of 
employment by residents of West Boylston have been filed. Set- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 19 

tlements have been made in 3 cases, the amount paid being $200.49. 
During the year 6 claims have been disallowed. The whole num- 
ber of settlements effected has been 474. The total amount paid on 
account of these claims has been $85,884.65. 

(10) Claims and Settlements for Depreciation of Real 

Estate. 

Settlements in 24 cases of injury to real estate in the towns of 
Clinton, Sterling and West Boylston have been made during the 
year ending December 31, 1904, and the sum of $26,151.17 has 
been paid. Of these claims, 2 have been settled in the courts. 
The total number of claims of this class settled to December 31, 
1904, has been 248, and the total amount paid thereon has been 
$244,395.77. 

It was provided by chapter 436 of the Acts of the year 1904 that 
the owners of real estate situated in that part of the town of Boyl- 
ston lying on the southerly and southeasterly sides of the reservoir 
and within the limits of the Nashua River watershed should have the 
right to recover for damages to real estate not taken, but directly 
or indirectly decreased in value by reason of the Metropolitan Water 
Act, in a manner similar to that before provided for owners of real 
estate in the town of West Boylston. No claims have been allowed 
by the Board under this act. 

(11) Claims on Account of Diversion of Water. 
There has been paid during the past year, on account of judg- 
ments obtained for the diversion of water, the sum of $37,463.80. 
The total sum paid under settlements and judgments for such claims 
since the beginning of the construction of the Water Works has been 
$1,135,708.91. These claims do not, however, in these or in the 
preceding cases, include amounts paid for expert services and court 
expenses. 

III. WATER WORKS— MAINTENANCE. 

Considerable addition has been made during the past year to the 
duties of the Engineer of the Distribution Department. On March 
10 the Sudbury Department, including also Lake Cochituate and the 
Cochituate Aqueduct, and on May 25 the Weston Aqueduct, were 
placed in charge of the Engineer of the Distribution Department. 
The title of the head of the department was changed to that of En- 



20 METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 

gineer of Sudbury and Distribution Departments. This engineer 
has now, therefore, charge of substantially all the work of mainte- 
nance and operation as tar west as Southborougb. He is assisted by 
Charles E. Qaberstroh, who has the immediate supervision of the 
Sudbury and Cochituate works and the portion of the Weston 
Aqueduct above the Weston Reservoir; by (ieorge E. Wilde, who 
has the immediate supervision of the Weston Reservoir and the re- 
mainder of the Weston Aqueduct, and of all the reservoirs and pipe 
lines within the Metropolitan District; and by John W. Lynch who 
has charge of the several pumping stations. 

(1) Operation of Works. 

All the 19 cities and towns, included within the Metropolitan 
Water District, having an estimated population of 972,1)00, have been 
supplied with water during the year, except the city of Newton and 
the town of Hyde Park. These two municipalities, though belong- 
ing to the District, have as yet made no application for a supply of 
water ; and, the Board being still of the opinion that they have not 
reached the safe capacity of their own sources of supply in a dry 
year, they have been charged with but one-sixth of the entire assess- 
ment and have not been supplied with water from the Metropolitan 
Water Works. 

In addition, the town of Swampscott is supplied with water under 
a special arrangement made with the Board, and a small part of the 
town of Saugus is permitted to take water under a contract with the 
Revere Water Company, which supplies water to the town of Revere. 

In April a request was made to the Board by the Cambridge Water 
Board for a temporary supply of water ; and, inasmuch as it appeared 
that an emergency existed in that city, not only by reason of the 
scarcity of water but also of the danger to health which would arise 
from the drawing down of Fresh Pond to a lower level, the Board 
voted to furnish water to the city to meet this emergency, such water 
to be supplied to the city of Cambridge subject to the same limita- 
tions and restrictions as should apply to the cities and towns of the 
Metropolitan Water District. Under this agreement Avater was fur- 
nished to that city for a period of 39 days, to the amount of 331,- 
">40,000 gallons, for which the city paid to the Commonwealth the 
sum of $15,218.70. Subsequently, in November, a request was 
again made by the Cambridge Water Board for a temporary supply 
of water; and, inasmuch as it appeared that a like emergency had 



No. 57.] AND SEWEEAGE BOARD. 21 

again arisen, the Board agreed to furnish water to the city of Cam- 
bridge to the extent of 300,000,000 gallons, subject to the same 
provisions as before. The 300,000,000 gallons were accordingly 
furnished, for which the Commonwealth is to receive $15,000. 

It was understood that the Cambridge authorities should, upon the 
meeting of the Legislature, ask for legislation by which the furnish- 
ing temporarily of water should be authorized by statute in case a 
similar emergency should again arise. 

Except the water supplied by the city of Newton and the town of 
Hyde Park from their own sources, the water supplied to the Met- 
ropolitan Water District came from the sources of the Metropolitan 
"Water System, and amounted to a total of 41,929,740,000 gallons, 
or an average daily supply of 114,876,000 gallons. 

(2) Storage Reservoirs. 

Lake Cochituate, which is the storage reservoir of the Cochituate 
watershed, has a normal capacity of 2,242,400,000 gallons. In the 
Sudbury watershed the Sudbury Reservoir has a like capacity of 7,- 
253,500,000 gallons, and the 7 smaller reservoirs have a combined 
capacity of 6,362,600,000 gallons. All the storage reservoirs, 
therefore, of the Cochituate and Sudbury watersheds, have a total 
capacity of 15,858,500,000 gallons. These reservoirs, however, 
hold at certain periods a somewhat larger amount of water than is 
estimated as their normal capacity. 

These storage reservoirs contained on January 1, 1904, 11,376,- 
800,000 gallons, but were gradually lowered until February 22, when 
they contained 10,550,000,000 gallons, the lowest amount reached. 
The largest quantity on storage in these reservoirs was on June 8, 
when they contained 16,011,500,000 gallons. 

The amount of water in storage was largely increased by the addi- 
tional quantity which was stored in the unfinished Wachusett Reser- 
voir. The amount stored in the Wachusett Reservoir was increased 
from 1,760,100,000 gallons, at the beginning of the year, to a maxi- 
mum of 10,117,500,000 gallons on June 8. 

There was a maximum total quantity of water in storage for the 
uses of the Metropolitan Water District on June 8, when the amount 
of 26,129,000,000 gallons was reached. 

The water in the Wachusett Reservoir was carried in June to the 
full height permitted by the condition of the dam and reservoir. 
Before this time, considerable water, estimated at 8,600,000,000 



22 METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 

gallons, was wasted into the river, because the conditions made it 
impossible to raise the water to a higher level. 

An average of 88,554,000 gallons per day was drawn from the 
Wachusett Reservoir and conveyed through the 'Wachusett Aqueduct 
into (he Sudbury Reservoir. From the Framingham Reservoir No. 
3, which received not only this supply but also the yield of a con- 
siderable portion of the Sudbury watershed, there was drawn and 
conveyed through the Sudbury Aqueduct an average of 64,827,000 
gallons per day, and an average of 30,575,000 gallons per day was 
carried through the Weston Aqueduct into the District. An aver- 
age of 9,004,000 gallons per day was also drawn through the Sudbury 
Aqueduct from Framingham Reservoir No. 2. An average of 
14,984,000 gallons per day was drawn from Lake Cochituate through 
the Cochituate Aqueduct. Lake Cochituate was, however, some- 
what reinforced by water received on several days in the year from 
the Framingham reservoirs. It is estimated that the Spot Pond 
watershed yielded an average of 497,000 gallons per day, which was 
in addition to the quantity pumped into the pond. 

Water was drawn substantially during the entire year from the 
Wachusett Reservoir or Nashua River ; from the Sudbury Reservoir 
and Framingham Reservoir No. 3; from Lake Cochituate for a 
period of 8^ months ; from Framingham Reservoir No. 2, Ashland 
Reservoir and Hopkinton Reservoir for a continuous period of 4 
months; and during 15 days from Whitehall Reservoir. No water 
was drawn from Framingham Reservoir No. 1 or from Farm Pond 
directly into the District. 

A driveway leading to the Sudbury Reservoir and Dam, which 
had been badly worn during the construction of the Weston Aque- 
duct, received thorough repairs. A wooden building, arranged for 
workshop and storage purposes, has been erected in connection 
with the other buildings of the Commonwealth situated near the 
Dam. Some repairs were also required at Framingham Reservoir 
No. 1 and at Lake Cochituate. 

(3) Distributing Reservoirs. 
The distributing reservoirs, so called, comprising Spot Pond, 
Chestnut Hill, Fells, Mystic, Waban Hill, Forbes Hill and Bear 
Hill reservoirs, and the Arlington and Forbes Hill standpipes, which 
are situated within the Metropolitan District, and were built more 
especially for the purpose of facilitating the distribution of water 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 23 

in the District, also serve secondarily for the storage of a large 
quantity of water which can be drawn upon in case of emergency. 
The total capacity of the above-named reservoirs is 2,181,230,000 
gallons. To this total may be added 200,000,000 gallons, the 
capacity of the Weston Reservoir, which was built especially as an 
equalizing reservoir for the waters coming through the Weston 
Aqueduct. During the past year, also, an arrangement has been 
made with the Water Commissioners of the city of Chelsea by which 
water may be drawn from the high-service reservoir in that city in 
case of emergency, for supplying other cities and towns situated in 
that portion of the District. In consideration of this use, the Board 
has made repairs to the lining of the reservoir at a cost of about 
$4,000. This reservoir has a capacity of 916,500 gallons. 

The grounds about Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Spot Pond, Fells 
Reservoir and Forbes Hill Reservoir, at which the tower commands 
an extensive view of the surrounding country, have been much 
resorted to in the summer season for recreation purposes. Mystic 
Lake, although not now used for water supply purposes, is main- 
tained in good repair, and its waters may be used in case of emer- 
gency for the purposes of the District. The estimated capacity of 
this lake is now 380,000,000 gallons. 

(4) Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct was kept in use during 283 days of the 
year. It was emptied for a thorough cleaning, and also for the 
purpose of repairing some cracks in the aqueduct which had been 
caused by changes of temperature. 

The Sudbury Aqueduct was in operation during 354 days. It 
was twice emptied for cleaning, and its use was discontinued also 
for necessary repairs to that portion of the aqueduct which crosses 
the Waban Bridge. There was a leakage from the aqueduct at this 
bridge, OAving to cracks in the masonry ; these were pointed or 
grouted and washed with cement, and the lower half of the aque- 
duct for the entire length of the bridge, a distance of 562.25 feet, 
was lined with sheet lead and otherwise reinforced. Other repairs 
of a minor character were required at Echo Bridge and at the Beaver 
Dam Brook culvert. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was in use 259 days during the year. 

The flow of the Weston Aqueduct, which had been put into oper- 
ation at the very end of the preceding year, was shut off for about 



u 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc-. 



three weeks, in order to do the finishing work upon the Weston 
Reservoir. At the same time some cracks in the :ujueduct, which 
developed soon alter construction, were repaired, and other finish- 
ing work was accomplished. The aqueduct was in use 320 days. 

(5) Pumping Stations. 

The operation of the Weston Aqueduct has enabled more than 
one-fourth part of the entire quantity of water consumed by the 
District to be supplied by gravity, and has consequently relieved, 
to a considerable extent, the low-service pumping station at Chest- 
nut Hill. 

The average number of gallons pumped per day at the pumping 
stations during the year was 95,525,000, as appears by the follow- 
ing table : — 



NAME. 


Total Capacity of 

Pumps (Gallons 

per Day). 


Average Number 

of Gallons 
pumped per Day. 


Chestnut Hill, high service, 

Chestnut Hill, low service, 

Spot Pond, 

Arlington, 

West Roxbury, 


66,000,000 

105,000,000 

30,000,000 

1,500,000 

2,000,000 


31,125,000 

55,380,000 

7,999,000 

517,000 

504,000 




204,500,000 


95,525,000 



Although the average height to which the water was pumped in 
the year 1904 was 86.87 feet, or 18.37 feet higher than in the pre- 
ceding year, the cost per million gallons pumped Avas $2,615, being a 
reduction from the preceding year of $0,195. This decrease in cost 
Was largely due both to the reduced price of coal and to the use of 
a larger proportion of anthracite buckwheat coal and screenings, 
which it has been found could profitably be mingled with other 
kinds of coal. 

Tests have been made to determine the heating power and value 
of all the kinds of coal which have been used at the several stations. 

The cost per million gallons raised 1 foot was for the Chestnut 
Hill high-service station $0,024, for the Chestnut Hill low-service 
station $0,030 and for the Spot Pond station $0,031. The cost is 
in each case considerably less than that of the preceding year. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 25 

(6) Pipe Lines and Pipe Yards. 

No new lines of main pipes have been put in service during the 
year. There have been 19 leaks in pipes, 16 of which were caused 
by defective joints. Two leaks were discovered in the main pipes, 
caused by breakage, one in the 30-inch high-service main in the 
grounds of the Chestnut Hill Reservoir, and the other in the 16-inch 
high-service main in Winthrop Avenue in Revere. During the year 
also the 12-inch pipe line on Washington Street in Lynn, for a dis- 
tance of 553 feet, was relaid on account of the damage done to it by 
electrolytic action. 

The emergency and repair forces, that for the northern district 
having its headquarters at the Glenwood pipe yard and the other 
for the southern district at the Chestnut Hill pipe yard, have been 
able to do all the work of repairing and relaying that has been re- 
quired. 

(7) Clinton Sewerage and Filtration Works. 

During the spring months, when the quantity of sewage was 
large, the pumps of the Clinton Sewerage Works were kept in 
operation during the night as well as the day. The quantity of 
sewage pumped and deposited upon the filter-beds has been, upon 
the average, 43,000 gallons per day less than during the preceding 
year, the quantity so pumped and deposited daily having been 
740,000 gallons. This decrease in the amount of sewage is owing 
in part to the fact that the Clinton Water Department has continued 
to increase the number of metered house services, and in part to the 
fact that, the river being lower, there has probably been less perco- 
lation of river water into the defective local sewers. 

The 8 new settling basins which have been added to the filtration 
beds were put into operation near the end of the year. Considerable 
experimenting has also been made in the methods of caring for the 
filter-beds, in order to improve further the character of the effluent. 

The expense of pumping was somewhat increased, owing to the 
employment of an additional engineer for the night service. The 
cost per million gallons pumped was $11.99, as against $9.37 
the preceding year. The cost per million gallons filtered was 
$8.29, as against $7.82 the preceding year. 



26 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(8) Sanitary [nspection and Regulations. 

Dr. J. J. Goodwin of Clinton has been employed, as heretofore, 
under the supervision of the engineers in charge of construction, to 
examine the camps and other buildings occupied by the laborers, for 
the purpose of keeping such places and the grounds about which 
construction has been carried on in proper sanitary condition. 

The general inspection of the Avatersheds, which has been exercised 
by the maintenance department, has been continued during the year 
under the supervision of William W. Locke, C.E., with two regular 
assistants. Other assistance has been rendered him by the engineers, 
and at times day laborers have been employed to carry out the im- 
provements which have been required. There have been no cases of 
contagious disease arising within the limits of the Wachusett Reser- 
voir, and few such cases upou the watershed. There has been a 
larger, but not an excessive, number of cases upon the Sudbury 
and Cochituate Avatersheds. Efficient measures have been taken in 
all cases to protect the purity of the Avater supply. 

Inspection has been made of 1,530 premises in the Wachusett 
watershed, and of 847 premises in the Sudbury and Cochituate 
Avatersheds, the conditions of which Avere for some reason suspected 
or called for examination. The larger number of these Avere either 
found in satisfactory condition, or but slight Avork Avas required in 
order to make them satisfactory. In the more serious cases in the 
Wachusett watershed remedies have been effected, through the efforts 
of the inspectors, on 15 premises, and 17 premises have been par- 
tially remedied. On the Sudbury and Cochituate Avatersheds 148 
premises have been remedied, all but 4 of them by sewer connec- 
tions ; and, in addition, 25 premises have been partially remedied. 
The local authorities have in general cooperated with the inspectors 
for the sanitary improvement of the region, and in no case during 
the year has it been necessary to resort to the courts in order to en- 
force the laAA^s and regulations for the prevention of pollution. 

A suit Avhich arose in the preceding year, through the claim of the 
owner of one of the mill properties of the right to discharge pollut- 
ing matter into the Quinepoxet River, is still pending before the 
courts. 

It has been the policy of the Board, as previously announced, to 
introduce, at the expense of the Commonwealth, the works which 
are required for remedying the cases of pollution when the sources 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 27 

existed prior to the operations of the Board. In cases where the 
sources of pollution have arisen since the operations of the Board 
began, it has been made the duty of the owner to pay the cost of 
such work ; but the engineers and inspectors * have been willing to 
offer suggestions regarding the means by which remedies could be 
supplied. 

The ditches which have been dug to drain swamps upon the water- 
shed have been kept in good condition. No ditches were dug dur- 
ing the past year. 

Samples of water from as many as 17 different points have been 
collected at regular intervals of a month or more, and submitted to 
the State Board of Health for analysis and examination. Samples 
have also been collected from a larger number of places weekly or 
fortnightly for examination by the biological force of the Board. 
Besides, other samples have been taken and examined from time to 
time, accordingly as called for, from the various reservoirs, brooks 
and filter-beds. Microscopic organisms have been found more 
abundant than usual in the Sudbury Reservoir and the Framingham 
Reservoir No. 3. These have caused some odor in the water, but 
are entirely innocuous. The organisms in Lake Cochituate have 
been fewer than usual, so that but for a small portion of the year has 
the water been found undesirable for use. 

(9) Marlborough Brook. 

The sewer intended to convey diluted sewage overflowing from 
the sewers of the city of Marlborough during heavy storms, and an 
additional filter-bed for purifying the overflow by filtration, which 
were completed at the end of the preceding year, have been in suc- 
cessful operation. The large filter-bed, which combines with filtra- 
tion the advantages of a considerable reservoir, has taken care of the 
overflow from the main sewer during times of freshet. The main 
filter-beds have, except for portions of six days during freshets, 
filtered successfully all of the water received from the brook. One 
of the old storage basins has been much enlarged by increasing its 
capacity from about 2,600,000 gallons to 9,000,000 gallons. An 
18-inch sewer pipe has also been substituted for the open channel, 
built from the end of the new overflow sewer to the filter-beds. 

The analyses which have been received show that the water has 
generally been satisfactorily purified by the filtration. 



28 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



IV. WATER WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

(1) Metropolitan* Water Loan, Receipts and Assessments. 

The appropriations for the construction and acquisition of the 
Metropolitan Water Works, the receipts which are added to these 
appropriations, the expenditures for the construction and acquisition 
of works, and the balance available on January 1, 1!>05, have been 
as follows : — 

Appropriation under chapter 488 of the Acts of 1895, . . . $27,000,000 00 
Appropriation under chapter 453 of the Acts of 1901, . . . 13,000,000 00 

$40,000,000 00 
Proceeds from the sales of property applicable to the construction 

and acquisition of works (of which $20,593.60 is for the year 

1904) 95,570 85 

$40,095,570 85 
Amount approved by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board 
for payments to December 31, 1904 (of which $2,174,498.19 is 
for the year 1904), 38,388,255 76 

Balance January 1, 1905, $1,707,315 09 

The Treasurer of the Commonwealth, under the authority given 
him to issue from time to time, on the request of the Board, 
negotiable bonds to an amount not exceeding $40,000,000, to be 
designated the "Metropolitan Water Loan," has sold bonds as 
follows : — 



Date. 


Bonds sold. 


Rate 
(Per Cent.). 


Time 
(Years). 


Price. 


Premiums 
(in Amount). 


1895, 


$2,225,000 


3i 


40 


$110 67 


$237,407 50 


1896, 






2,775,000 


U 


40 


110 67 


296,092 50 


1896, 






2,000,000 


u 


39 


106 76268 


135,253 60* 


1897, 






6,000,000 


u 


38£ 


107 82 


469,200 00 


1898, 






2,000,000 


H 


40 


113 176 


263,520 00 


1898, 






2,000,000 


U 


40 


112 877 


257,540 00 


1899, 






3,000,000 


3 


40 


100 64 


19,200 00 


1900, 






1,000,000 


3 


39 


102 78 


27,800 00 


1901, 






3,000,000 


3 


40 


102 155 


64,650 00 


1901, 






100,000 


3 


40 


100 375 


375 00 


1901, 






150,000 


3 


40 


100 10 


150 00 


1901, 






205,000 


3 


39£ 


100 25 


512 50 


1901, 






50,000 


3 


39£ 


100 25 


125 00 


1901, 






50,000 


3 


39£ 


100 50 


250 00 



* Including $18,673.60 from readjustment of rate made by the Treaeurer in 1897. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



29 



Date. 



Bonds sold. 



Rate 
(Percent.) 



Time 

(Years). 



Price. 



Premiums 
(in Amount). 



1901, 
1901, 
1901, 
1901, 
1901, 
1902, 
1902, 
1903, 
1903, 
1904, 
1904, 



|300,000 

200,000 

3,100,000 

1,345,000 

1,500,000 

3,000,000 

500,000 

250,100 

1,250,000 

500,000 

2,000,000 



$38,500,000 



3 


394 


3 


394 


u 


394 


3 


394 


3 


394 


34 


40 


34 


40 


34 


40 


34 


40 


34 


394 


34 


40 



5100 10 
100 25 
106 71 
100 00 
100 00 
109 13 
109 13 
106 725 
106 1329 
104 60* 
104 60 



$300 00 

500 00 

208,010 00 



273,900 00 

45,650 00 

16,812 50 

76,661 25 

23,000 00 

92,000 00 



$2,508,909 85 



* These bonds were temporarily sold in 1903 to the sinking fund at par, and were subsequently, in 
1904, resold from the sinking fund at this rate. 

The sinking fund established by the Treasurer of the Common- 
wealth has amounted at the end of each year to sums as follows : — 



December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 



1895, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 



$226,286 05 
699,860 70 
954,469 00 
1,416,374 29 
1,349,332 97 
1,573,619 72 
1,662,426 95 
2,256,803 81 
2,877,835 59 
3,519,602 92 



The assessments for the year 1004, made by the Treasurer of the 
Commonwealth, for the payment of the interest on the bonds issued 
by the Commonwealth, the sinking fund requirements and the ex- 
penses of operation and maintenance of the Water Works, were as 
follows : — 



Arlington, 
Belmont, . 
Boston, . 
Chelsea, . 
Everett, . 
Hyde Park, 
Lexington, 
Maiden, . 
Med ford, . 
Melrose, . 
Milton, . 



$ 12,972 76 

6,391 85 

1,700,274 07 

44,507 49 

33,537 19 

3,091 24 

6,391 91 

46,499 48 

27,519 87 

19,722 73 

16,173 01 



Nahant, . 
Newton, . 
Quincy, . 
Revere, . 
Somerville, 
Stoneham, 
Watertown, 
Winthrop, 



$3,535 05 
10,359 65 
34,084 24 
15,717 42 
86,736 93 

8,343 88 
15,060 77 

9,880 83 

$2,100,800 37 



30 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doe. 



The comparatively smaller Bums assessed upon the city of Newton 
and the town of Byde Park were owing to the faot that neither ot 
these municipalities had reached the safe capacity of its sources, and 
had been furnished with water. 

The prooeeds from the operations of the Board, exclusive of the 
proceeds from sales of property, have been, according to the pro- 
visions ot the Water Act, applied to the payment of interest and 
sinking fund requirements, and the maintenance and operation ot 
works, as follows : — 



For the year 1904, . 



$12,462 85 



The expenditures for the maintenance and operation of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Works have been as follows : — 



For the year 1904, . 



. $315,780 81 



Sums have been received during the year 1904, under the pro- 
visions of the Metropolitan Water Act, for water furnished, as 
follows : — 

Cambridge, $15,218 70 

Framingham Water Company, 366 80 

Revere AVater Company, 391 00 

Swampscott, , , . . 4,100 00 



$20,076 50 



At the close of the year, the Treasurer, in accordance with the 
requirements of the Act, has distributed to the cities and towns of 
the District, in proportion to the annual assessments theretofore 
contributed by them, this amount, as follows : — 



Arlington, . 


$113 86 


Nahant, 


$33 14 


Belmont, 


59 67 


Newton, 


97 98 


Boston, 


. 16,475 04 


Quincy, 


319 96 


Chelsea, 


431 62 


Revere, 


141 99 


Everett, 


307 25 


Somerville, . 


820 31 


Hyde Park, . 


29 10 


Stoneham, . 


60 96 


Lexington, . 


18 06 


Watertown, 


140 82 


Maiden, 


443 63 


Winthrop, . 


87 76 


Med ford, 
Melrose, 


260 35 
188 34 








$20,076 50 


Milton, 


46 66 







No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



31 



(2) Expenditures for the Different Works. 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the 
various operations for the different works : — 



Construction and Acquisition of 
Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1904. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1904, 



Administration applicable to all parts of the 
construction and acquisition of the work?, 
Wachusett Dam and Reservoir: — 

Wachusett Dam, 

North Dike, . " . 

South Dike, . 

Removal of soil, 

Relocation of railroads, 

Roads and bridges, . 

Real estate, 

Damages, real estate not taken, business and 
loss of wages, 

Other expenses, 



Improving Wachusett watershed, 
Wachusett Aqueduct, 
Sudbury Reservoir, . 
Protection of Sudbury supply, . 
Improving Sudbury watershed, 
Protection of Cochituate supply, 
Improving Cochituate watershed, 
Improving Lake Cochituate, 
Pipe lines, Dam No. 3 to Dam No. 1 
Pipe line, Rosemary siphon, 
Weston Aqueduct: — 

Aqueduct, - 

Reservoir, .... 

Supply pipe lines, . 

Real estate, taxes and other expenses, 

Distribution system : — 

Low service : — 
Pipe lines and connections, 
Pumping station, Chestnut Hill, 

Reservoir, Spot Pond 

Gate-house and connections, Chestnu 

Hill Reservoir 

Real estate and other expenses, . 

Northern high service : — 
Pipe lines and connections, 
Spot Pond pumping station, 
Fells Reservoir, Stoneham, 
Bear Hill Reservoir, Stoneham, 
Real estate and other expenses, 

Amounts carried forward , 



,323 07 

63,800 28 

106,034 16 

394,487 81 

140,683 75 

83,170 66 

62,173 83 

46,616 66 
513 16 



$91,612 79 

55,411 77 

9,464 60 

60,251 58 



$368 66 



2,256 78 



249 30 



111 90 



$17,594 74 



1,506,803 38 

40,554 03 

1,978 75 

9,045 99 
3,278 84 



216,740 74 



$2,986 64 $1,795,996 47 



M.983,151 99 
747,288 45 
115,541 31 

2,338,057 96 
821,700 77 
484,475 25 

3,141,070 55 

469,566 42 
5,382 22 



2,316,010 77 
283,454 79 
584,033 92 
184,151 24 



$1,751,205 67 
459,251 97 
578,101 58 

65,480 88 
86,809 89 

440,539 28 

291,829 35 

141,392 94 

38,267 70 

14,838 05 



$239,078)75 



10,106,234 92 

58,924 81 

1,790,237 62 

2,922,445 21 

128,797 06 

94,754 58 

9,000 00 

8,860 68 

103,537 29 

48,471 48 

" 23,142 98 



3,367,650 72 



$3,867,717 31 $18,901,136 10 



32 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



CoNSTlU'CTlON AND ACQUISITION OK 
WOBKfl 



Amounta brought forward t 

Distribution system — ( '<>». 

Southern high service : — 
Pipe lines and connections, 
Pumping station, Chestnut Hill, 
Forbes Hill Reservoir, Quincy, 
Waban Hill Reservoir, Newton, 
Real estate and other expenses, 

Northern extra high service, . 

Southern extra high service, . 

Meters and connections, . 

Improving Spot Pond Brook, 

Glenwood pipe yard, 

Chestnut Hill pipe yard, 

Diversion of water, South Branch of Nashua 

River,* : 

Acquisition of existing water works : — 
Reimbursement city of Boston, partially 

constructed Sudbury Reservoir, 
To Boston, for works taken Jan. 1, 1898, 
To Maiden, Medford and Melrose (on ac 

count) for taking of Spot Pond, . 
To Newton, for Waban Hill Reservoir, 

Transfers of works acquired and other prop- 
erty to accounts for special works, . 

Engineering, conveyancing, etc 

Pipes, Valves, Castings, etc., sent first to 
Storage Yards, and afterwards transferred 
as needed to Different Parts of the Work. 

Sent to storage yards, 

Transferred from storage yards to works, and 
included in costs above 

Total for constructing and acquiring of 
works, 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1904. 



$2,986 64 $1,795,996 47 



5 00 



14 00 

52 00 

812 74 

176 92 



$317,820 68 



$317,820 68 



$317,820 68 
9,706 94 



$921 83 
718 44 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1904. 



4,047 30 
46,723 41 



327,527 62 



$3,867,717 31 $18,901,136 10 



504,420 55 
242,121 36 
90,003 49 
61,592 11 
10,226 36 
13,951 47 
22,815 67 
74,901 28 
3,717 05 
33,100 59 
11,311 26 



4,935,878 49 
1,357,431 31 



$1,157,921 59 
12,768,948 80 

343,570 39 
60,000 00 



$14,330,440 78 
1,240,166 42 



$13,090,274 36 
33,814 54 



13,124,088 90 



203 39 



$2,084,380 97 



2,014,660 01 



69,720 96 



$2,174,498 19 



$38,388,255 76 



* Of the total expenditures from the beginning of the work, the sum of $149,102 is for Clinton 
sewerage system. 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1904. 



Administration, . 
General supervision, . 
Taxes and other expenses, 

Amount carried forward , 



$9,673 13 

4,435 85 

30,314 05 



$44,423 03 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



33 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1904. 



Amount brought forward, . 

Wachueett Reservoir Department : — 
Sanitary inspection, 

Buildings, 

Reservoir, 



Wachusett Dam and Aqueduct Department : — 

General superintendence 

Dam and aqueduct, 

Clinton sewerage system : — 

Pumping station, 

Sewers, screens and filter-beds, . 
Sanitary inspection, 



Sudbury Department : — 
General superintendence, 
Superintendence, Framingham office, 
Ashland Reservoir, .... 
Hopkinton Reservoir, 
Whitehall Reservoir, 
Framingham Reservoirs, 1, 2 and 3, 
Sudbury Reservoir, 
Lake Cochituate, .... 
Marlborough Brook filters, . 

Pegan filters, 

Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds, 

Sanitary inspection, 

Sudbury and Cochituate Aqueducts, 

Weston Aqueduct 

Biological laboratory, 



Distribution Department : — 

Superintendence, 

Arlington pumping station, pumping service, .... 
Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, pumping service, . 
Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, pumping service, . 
Spot Pond pumping station, pumping service, .... 
West Roxbury pumping station, pumping service, . 

Arlington standpipe 

Bear Hill Reservoir, 

Chelsea Reservoir, 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 

Fells Reservoir, 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, 

Mystic Lake, conduit and pumping station 

Mystic Reservoir, 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 

Spot Pond, 

Buildings at Spot Pond, 

Amounts carried forward, 



$2,369 

474 

3,491 



$1,381 
10,473 

3,135 
4,444 

67 



$3,931 
6,872 
1,406 
1,383 
252 
4,890 
6,308 
3,156 
6,547 
3,088 
787 
2,568 

22,651 
7,647 
2,568 



$12,549 

5,354 

31,146 

32,283 

11,950 

6,087 

40 

135 

4,036 

8,813 

735 

1,247 

3,277 

1,752 

500 

8,990 

38 



$44,423 03 



6,335 87 



19,502 84 



74,061 95 



$128,939 60 $144,323 



34 



MKTROPOUTAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Main i i:\a\ck and OPERATION. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1904. 



wnta brought fortoard, 

Dlitribotion Department — Oon. 

Pipe lines : — 
i.ow service 

Northern high him vice, 

Southern high service, 

Supply pipe lines, 
Buildings at Chestnut Hill, . 
Chestnut Mill pipe yard, 
Q-lenwood pipe yard and buildings, 

8table a , 

Waste prevention, . 
Venturi meters, . 



Total for maintaining and operating works, 



$128,939 60 $144,323 69 



13,000 16 
3,952 01 
3,115 61 
812 20 
1,632 30 
1,481 05 
4,733 94 
5,915 58 
4,434 65 
3,440 02 



171,457 12 
$315,780 81 



(3) Detailed Financial Statement. 
The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the Metropolitan 
Water Act, an abstract of the expenditures and disbursements, re- 
ceipts, assets and liabilities for the year 1904. 



(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 

The total amount of the expenditures and disbursements on account 
of construction and acquisition of w r orks for the year beginning Jan- 
uary 1, 1904, and ending December 31, 1904, is $2,174,498.19; 
and the total amount from the time of the organization of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1904, is 
$38,388,255.76. 

For maintenance and operation the expenditures for the year have 
been $315, 780. 81, and from the beginning of the work, $1,9 12, 536. 44. 

The salaries of the commissioners, and other expenses of admin- 
istration, have been apportioned to the construction of the works 
and to the maintenance and operation of the same, and appear 
under each of those headings. 

The following is a division of the expenditures according to their 
general character : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



35 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1904. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1904. 



Construction or Works and Acquisition 
by Purchase or Taking. 

Administration. 
Commissioners, . 
Secretary and auditor, 
Clerks and stenographer, 
Legal services, 
Travelling, . 
Stationery and printing, 
Postage, express and telegrams, 
Furniture and fixtures, 
Alterations and repairs of buildings, 
Telephone, lighting, heating, water and 

of building, . 
Rent and taxes, main office, 
Miscellaneous expenses, 

Engineering . 
Chief engineer and department engineers, 
Principal assistant engineers, 
Engineering assistants, 
Consulting engineers, . 

Inspectors 

Architects, .... 
Railroad and street car travel, 
Wagon hire, 
Stationery and printing, 
Postage, express and telegrams 
Engineering and drafting instruments 

tools, 

Engineering and drafting supplies, . 
Books, maps and photographic supplies, 
Furniture and fixtures, 
Alterations and repairs of buildings : — 

Main office, 

Sub-offices, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care 
of buildings : — 

Main office, 

Sub-offices 

Rent and taxes, — main office, . 

Rent of sub-offices and other buildings, 

Field offices and sheds, 

Clinton office building, 

Unclassified supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Amounts carried forward,. 



and 



$5,833 33 
2,894 23 
4,933 88 

488 91 

1,287 71 

223 75 

44 15 

2 41 

1,026 10 
603 00 

257 27 



$16,859 42 
11,568 41 

68,445 47 

22,317 07 

3,116 45 

777 10 

4,308 64 

905 18 

563 10 

49 22 
898 17 
356 31 

46 73 

472 32 
111 50 



2,773 56 

2,079 38 

1,809 00 

252 00 

13 30 

589 31 

520 20 



$17,594 74 



138,831 84 



$156,426 58 



$100,976 92 
44,115 11 
49,224 15 
2,359 00 
3,409 09 
8,671 98 
2,563 37 
4,133 44 
5,743 27 

9,737 94 
3,855 80 
4,288 68 



$193,107 99 

136,790 84 

946,273 78 

23,437 07 

281,355 34 

32,528 39 

26,606 15 

42,772 96 

24,797 08 

7,452 85 

19,225 73 

23,916 48 

6,369 44 

14,876 97 

13,938 36 

2,860 07 



19,858 68 
17,447 02 
11,335 75 
4,513 74 
1,274 49 
9,866 87 
8,175 53 
8,452 21 



$239,078 75 



1,877,233 79 
$2,116,312 54 



36 



M KTKOPOLITAX WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Gbnekm. OharaoTXB of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1904. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1904. 



Amount* brought forward, 

(hnBtruction. 

Preliminary work (borings, teat pita and other 
investigations) : — 

Advertising, 

Other preliminary work as given in detail in 
preceding annual report 

Contracts, Wachusett Reservoir : — 

Contracts completed and final payments 
made prior to January 1, 1904, . 

Busch Bros., excavating soil, Sect. 6, and 
building road, West Boylston and Boyl- 
ston, — $600 due, deducted from estimate, 
September 5, 1900, 

Newell & Snowling Construction Co., exca- 
vating soil from Sect. 8, and completing 
westerly portion of North Dike, 

Bruno, Salomone & Petitti, Sect. 10, Wachu- 
sett Reservoir, Boylaton and West Boyl- 
ston, 

McArthur Bros. Co , building Sect. 2 of the 
Relocation of Ceutral Massachusetts Rail- 
road, 

The George M. Atkins Co., arch bridges and 
abutments at Oakdale, . 

Francis A. McCauliff, masonry arch bridge 
at West Boylston, 

John F. Magee & Co., South Dike, 

McArthur Bros. Co., placing riprap on the 
westerly portion of the North Dike, . 

McArthur Bros. Co., Wachusett Dam, 

Wm. Cramp & Sons Ship and Engine Build- 
ing Co., bronze grooves for Wachusett 
Dam 

Davis & Farnum Manufacturing Co., cast- 
ings for Wachusett Dam, . 

Gibby Foundry Co., castings for Wachusett 
Dam, 

Coffin Valve Co., sluice gates for Wachusett 
Dim, 

Chapman Valve Manufacturing Co., valves 
for Wachusett Dam, 

Connery & Wentworth, superstructure of 
lower gate-chamber of the Wachusett 
Dam, 

Contracts completed, Wachusett Aqueduct, . 
Contracts completed, Sudbury Reservoir, 

Amounts carried forward,. 



. $156,426 58 



$82 60 



$125,723 22 



257,999 39 



5,735 63 



11,233 09 


118,034 45 


34,282 06 


496,528 24 


3,691 00 


1,248 97 


1,205 53 


1,687 00 


2,317 67 



55,971 20 



$2,116,312 54 



82 60 



$6,188 55 



155,456 66 
161,645 21 



1,115,657 45 



$2,062,386 09 



34,560 63 


394,592 50 


424,768 56 


246,439 34 


38,528 22 


11,233 09 


118,034 45 


51,017 50 


1,423,940 48 


3,691 00 


1,248 97 


1,205 53 


7,887 00 


2,317 67 



55,971 20 



$1,272,166 63 



4,877,822 23 
1,447,208 55 
1,545,028 33 

$10,148,016 86 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



37 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1904. 



From Beginning of "Work 
to December 31, 1904. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Construction — Con. 
Contracts, protection Sudbury Supply : — 

City of Marlborough, main sewer, 
Contracts completed, improving Lake Cochit- 

uate, 

Contracts completed, protection Cochituate 

Supply : — 
Town of Framingham, low-level sewer, 
Contracts completed, Rosemary siphon, . 
Contracts completed, pipe line, Dam No. 3 to 

Dam No. 1, 

Contracts completed, Clinton sewerage sys- 
tem 

Contracts, Weston Aqueduct: — 
Contracts completed and final payments 

made prior to January 1, 1904, . 

T. H. Gill Sect. 1 

Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . . Sect. 2 

Sundry bills paid under this contract, 
Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . . Sect. 3 

Sundry bills paid under this contract, 
Bruno, Salomone & Petitti, . . Sect. 5 
Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . . Sect. 6 

Sundry bills paid under this contract, 
Winston & Co., . . Sects. 8 and 10 
Winston & Co., . . . . Sect. 11 
Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . . Sect. 12 

Sundry bills paid under this contract, 

Michael H. Keefe Sect. 13 

Columbus Construction Co., . . Sect. 13 

Nawn & Brock Sect. 14 

Winston & Co., . . . . Sect. 15 
Nawn & Brock, Weston Reservoir, Sect. 1 
Nawn & Brock, Weston Reservoir, Sect. 2 
Dennis F. O'Connell, supply pipe lines 

Sect. 2, 

C. A. Dodge & Co , superstructures of the 

head and meter chambers, . 
Woodbury & Leighton, superstructures of 

the channel and screen chambers, 

Contracts completed, Distribution System, 
Deduct value of pipes, valves, etc., included 

in above list, transferred to maintenance 

account December 31, 1900, 

Amounts carried forward , 



- $1,272,166 63 



9,000 00 



$10,148,016 86 



$28 12 
2,397 62 

3,797 44 

125 28 

6,968 05 
2,000 00 
5,258 39 

3,339 77 



12,472 79 


3,818 44 


7,000 00 


6,434 33 


31,454 63 


1,500 00 


4,740 00 


4,780 75 



96,115 61 





9,000 00 




60,657 45 




9,000 00 




5,916 96 




17,240 22 




66,878 22 


$366,458 02 




34,483 39 




197,645 17 




2,911 80 




122,280 42 




4,214 78 




128,226 63 




106,805 66 




6,968 05 




146,552 09 




159,892 59 




135,181 78 




3,339 77 




11,206 05 




406,046 59 




59,449 04 




168,642 96 




63,778 33 




123,970 70 




71,287 87 




10,804 00 


1 


12,484 75 


2,342,630 44 




$4,383,372 31 





3,139 77 



$1,377,282 24 



4,380,232 54 
$17,039,572 69 



38 



MKTROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Chaka. ntB ov Kxpenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1904. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1904. 



vices, medical services, anal 



hard 



Amount* brought forward, 

( 'on*? ruction —Con. 
Additional work 
Labor, 
Professional sen 

yses, etc., 
Travelling, 
Rent, . 
Water rates, 
Freight and express, 
Jobbing and repairing, . 
Tools, machinery, appliances and 

supplies, .... 
Electrical supplies, . 
Castings, ironwork and metals, 
Iron pipe and valves, 
Blasting supplies, . 
Paint and coating, . 
Fuel, oil and waste, 
Lumber and field buildings, . 

Drain pipe 

Brick, cement and stone, 
Sand, gravel and filling, . 
Municipal and corporation work, 

Police service 

Sanitary inspection, 

Judgments and settlements for damages, 

Unclassified supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, . 

Legal and expert : — 
Legal services, . 
Expert services, 
Court expenses, 
Miscellaneous expenses, . 



Real Estate. 
Legal and expert : — 

Legal services, . 

Conveyancer and assistants, 

Experts, . 

Appraisers, 

Court expenses, 

Counsel expenses, . 

Conveyancing supplies, 

Conveyancing expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, . 
Settlements made by Board, 

Amounts carried forward, 



$1,377,282 24 



$60,356 83 

81 00 
597 75 

45 91 

1,496 32 

435 73 

4,260 33 

44 22 

4,530 89 

2,510 92 

122 34 

174 70 

292 24 

3,669 80 

1,274 56 

5,439 34 

85 00 

102,802 04 

15,435 50 

1,205 00 

2,040 67 

2,666 07 

137 15 



209,704 31 



$100 00 



$5,567 50 

300 00 

1,927 00 

3,416 00 

43 91 

285 72 

336 80 

101,475 26 



100 00 



$113,352 19 $1,587,086 55 



$17,039,572 69 



$634,404 08 


1,608 99 


1,989 97 


3,556 73 


1,421 08 


11,838 71 


8,452 94 


71,382 94 


4,830 21 


61,115 30 


54,315 05 


1,339 48 


4,065 60 


10,339 37 


79,954 58 


8,699 48 


23,724 36 


5,837 26 


207,656 39 


202,838 83 


11,322 18 


37,294 61 


14,402 66 


3,038 28 


1 rffln 120 0<? 




$4,668 82 


522 74 


909 04 


49 05 

fi 140 rt<i 



$4,736 31 

99,388 97 

17,871 58 

21,049 09 

8,428 80 

43 25 

3,149 53 

5,717 98 

3,928 12 

3,259,315 84 



$3,423,629 47 $18,511,151 42 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



39 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1904. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1904. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Real Estate — Con. 
Judgments, . 

Taxes and tax equivalents, . 

Care and disposal, 

Damages to Real Estate not taken, to Business 

and on Account of Loss of Wages. 
Legal and expert : — 

Legal services, . 

Expert services, 

Court expenses, 
Settlements, 
Judgments, . 

Claims on Account of Diversion of Water 
Legal and expert : — 

Legal services, . 

Expert services, 

Court expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 
Settlements, . 
Judgments, . 

Purchase of Existing Water Works 
Legal and expert : — 

Legal services, . 

Expert services, 

Court expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, . 
Settlements and judgments, 

Relocation Central Massachusetts Railroad. 
Settlements, 

Total amount of construction expenditures, 



$113,352 19 $1,587,086 55 

42,928 90 

6,883 41 
163,164 50 



$787 16 

1,159 60 

38,851 66 

7,765 00 



$396 31 
1,435 25 



37,463 80 



$1,718 96 

3,733 33 

518 00 

317,820 68 



48,563 42 



39,295 36 



323,790 97 
12,597 39 



2,174,498 19 



5,423,629 47 $18,511,151 42 

136,930 23 
67,917 07 
67,412 97 



3,695,889 74 



$1,130 67 

1,635 08 

10,239 59 

380,867 82 

88,698 60 



$3,774 98 

19,339 69 

19,105 69 

1,222 63 

917,350 00 

218,358 91 



$1,878 89 

4,369 61 

3,733 33 

1,470 94 

14,330,440 78 



482,571 76 



— 1,179,151 90 



14,341,893 55 

177,597 39 
$38,388,255 76 



General Character of Expenditures. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1904. 


Maintenance and Operation of Works. 
Administration: — 

Postage, printing, stationery and other supplies, 

Telephoue, heating, lighting and care of building, 


$3,500 00 
3,767 67 
1,496 92 
120 31 
322 90 
151 68 
150 00 



Miscellaneous expenses, . 
Amount carried forward, 



),673 13 



40 



MKTKOPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Genkkm. Character or Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 81, 1904. 



tnmi brought forward, 

Maintenance and Operation of Works— Con. 
Supervision and general superintendence: — 

Chief engineer and department engineers 

Engineering and clerical assistants 

Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephone, heating, lighting and care of offices 

Travelling and incidental expenses, . . . . . 

Alterations and repairs of buildings, 

Rent and taxes, main office 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Pumping service : — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Small supplies and expenses, 

Rent, West Roxbury pumping station, 

Superintendents and assistant superintendents 

Engineering assistants, 

Laboratory force, 

Sanitary inspectors, 

Recording and scientific instruments and supplies 

Labor and teaming, 

Tools, machinery and appliances, 

Lumber and hardware supplies, 

Jobbing and repairing 

Travelling, 

Horses, vehicles and stable expenses, 

Fuel, lighting and telephone 

Municipal and corporation work 

Unclassified supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Conveyancer and assistants, 

Taxes and tax equivalents, 

Contracts and agreements, 

Contracts for pipes, valves, etc., bought from construction work since 

January 1, 1904, 

Total expenditures for maintenance and operation, .... 



$9,673 13 



9,333 92 


8,001 68 


829 64 


1,030 16 


1,846 64 


346 41 


450 00 


459 94 


46,150 29 


35,347 61 


1,234 08 


843 90 


2,469 17 


776 52 


3,363 99 


13,213 21 


1,884 02 


2,779 92 


691 76 


107,066 81 


2,719 15 


3,248 79 


1,092 71 


5,224 41 


5,201 08 


3,973 62 


35 50 


11,180 65 


2,313 98 


560 00 


29,754 05 


955 00 


1,729 27 


$315,780 81 



(b) Receipts. 

The total amount of receipts from rents, sales of property, etc, 
for the year beginning January 1, 1904, and ending December 31, 
1904, is $53, 132.95, and the total amount from the time of the 
organization of the Metropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to 
December 31, 1904, is $392,652.84. The general character of these 
receipts is as follows : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



41 



General Character of Receipts. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1904. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1904. 


For distribution back to District : — 

District entrance fees 

Supplying water outside of District, . 
Water furnished to water companies, . 


$19,318 70 
757 80 

*90 07fi *ift 


$92,265 00 
51,656 84 

36,704 03 

4t!lR0 fi of i 87 


To the credit of the loan fund : — 
Real estate and buildings, .... 
Labor, tools, supplies and reimbursements, 


$4,822 22 
15,771 38 

90 ^Q<? fiO 


$19,586 48 

75,984 37 

15 570 85 


To the credit of the sinking fund : — 
Forfeiture for contracts awarded but not 

Unclassified receipts and interest, 


$5,846 18 
4,696 48 
1,920 19 

lO ^RO oc 


$500 00 

81,943 15 

31,696 37 

2,316 60 

116 156 12 












$392,652 84 



The foregoing receipts have been credited to the various objects 
or works, as follows : — 



Receipts from Different Works. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1904. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1904. 


Distribution back to District : — 












Admission into Metropolitan Water District 












(Quincy, Nahant, Arlington, Stoneham, 












Milton and Lexington), .... 


- 






$92,265 00 




Supplying water to cities and towns outside 












of Water District (Swampscott, Lexington 














$19,318 70 






51,656 84 




Water furnished to water companies, . 


757 80 


$20,076 


50 


36,704 03 


$180,625 87 


Construction and acquisition of works : — 






Administration, 


$12 40 






$13 15 




Wachusett Dam 


- 






4,897 09 




Wachusett Reservoir, 


7,426 07 






104,138 25 




Wachusett Aqueduct, 


- 






5,204 70 




Weston Aqueduct, 


2,131 82 






4,313 74 




Sudbury Reservoir and watershed, 


19 60 






7,274 76 




Distribution system 


11,569 48 






54,701 74 




Diversion of water, Clinton sewerage system, 


534 18 






1,191 09 




Purchase of existing water works, 


1,365 53 


23,059 08 


8,591 02 


190,325 54 


Maintenance and operation of works : — 






Wachusett Aqueduct 


$517 67 






$3,060 61 






5,310 67 






5,310 67 






1,258 84 






6,856 93 




Distribution system, 


2,333 01 






4,279 78 




Clinton sewerage system, .... 


677 18 


9,997 37 


2,193 44 


21,701 43 










$53,132 


95 


$392,652 84 



42 



MKTKOPOLITAX WATER 



[Pul). Doc. 



(<■) Assets. 

The following is an abstract of the assets of the Water Works, 
a complete sohedule of which is kept on file in the oilicc of the 
Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments and 
supplies; police supplies; howes, vehicles, field machinery, etc. ; machinery, 
tools and other appliances and supplies; real estate connected with works 
not completed; completed works, including real estate and buildings con- 
nected therewith. 

(d) Liabilities. 

There are liabilities as follows : — 

Current bills unpaid, f 11,796 81* 

Due on monthly pay rolls, 3,586 51 



$15,383 32 

Amounts reserved on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of 
Contracts or until Claims are settled. 



Name. 



Work. 



Amount. 



McArthur Bros Co., 

Busch Bros 

Bruno, Salomone & Petitti, 
John F. Magee & Co., . 
Connery & Wentworth, 
F. A. McCauliff, . 
McArthur Bros. Co , . 
"Winston & Co., . 



Wachusett Dam $30,00000 

Building road, Wachusett Reservoir, 600 00 

Wachusett Reservoir, Sect. 10, 25,000 00 

South Dike ! 20,529 61 

Superstructure of the lower gate chamber, Wachusett Djim, 13,992 80 

Masonry arch bridge at "West Boylston 1,982 31 

Relocation Central Massachusetts Railroad, Sect. 2, . . 10,000 00 

Weston Aqueduct, Sects. 8 and 10, 147 43 

,$102,252 15 



Amounts have been agreed upon in the following cases, but the 
deeds have not yet passed : — 

Winthrop Parker et al., trustees, $425 ; Martha E. Prescott, estate 
of, $400 ; Edmund F. Brigham et als., $400 ; Bertram A. Bancroft, 
$115; Lucy White, $250; Pratt & Inman, $48; Charles F. C. 
Henderson, $800 ; Kayajan Serabian, $130 ; Anna M. Bennett, 
$160; P. Arvid Lundgren, $745 ; Walter E. Reeves, $845. 

On the claims of the following it is impossible to state the 
amounts due for land damages and water rights, as no sums have 
been agreed upon, and suits are now pending in the courts for the 
determination of most of them : — 



* Miscellaneous current bills of 1904, including those coming in from time to time, after January 1, 
1905, have since been paid. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 43 

Charles L. Johnson, Charles B. Sawin, city of Maiden, balance, 
city of Medford, balance, city of Melrose, balance, Emory A. Bacon, 
James Dorr, Framingham Water Company, Charles W. Felt, town 
of West Boylston, Eliza M. Childs et al., Charles J. Paine, George 
H. Thompson, Benjamin W. Clemmons, town of Framingham, 
Henry S. Milton et cd., trustees, Marion Preston, George A. Ward 
et aZ., Edward Dooley, Harry Dutton et al., Charles A. Warren, 
Ida M. Tay, William Dwyer. 

V. SEWERAGE WORKS — CONSTRUCTION. 

The Metropolitan Sewerage Works provide for the sewage of 
areas amounting to 193 square miles, including the whole or parts 
of 25 cities and towns in the Metropolitan District. The works are 
embraced in two systems: the North Metropolitan System, which 
provides for the district situated largely in the Charles River and 
Mystic River valleys, lying north of the Charles River, and whose 
sewage is carried to Deer Island and thence emptied into Boston 
harbor; and the South Metropolitan System, which provides for the 
sewage of the portion of the Charles River valley lying south of the 
Charles River, as well as the city of Waltham and the town of 
Watertown, situated on the north side of the river, and also for a 
portion of the Neponset River valley and the city of Quincy, and 
having its outlet, by the recently completed High-level Sewer, also 
into Boston harbor. 

Within these areas have been laid 95.55 miles of main sewers, 87 
miles of which were constructed by the Metropolitan boards, and 
8.79 miles were purchased from the cities and towns. These areas 
remain the same as last year, and are more particularly described in 
the report of the Engineer of the Sewerage Works, which follows. 

The amount expended during the past year on account of the 
Sewerage Works was $829,941.92, of Avhich $184,655.82 was ex- 
pended on the North Metropolitan System and $645,286.10 on the 
South Metropolitan System. 

The total cost of the Metropolitan sewers, including 6 pumping 
stations and other structures used in connection therewith, has been 
$13,666,832.38 ; and of this total there is charged to the North 
Metropolitan System $6,086,569.91, and to the South Metropolitan 
System $7,580,262.47. 



11 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(1) North Metropolitan System. 

The extension of the North Metropolitan Sewer through the city 
of Chelsea to the town of Revere, and the extension of the Cam- 
bridge branch of the sewer to the town of Belmont, both begun in 
the year 1903, have been constructed, and all sewers so far author- 
ized upon this system have been completed. 

Owing to peculiar difficulties in the construction of the Revere 
extension, resulting from the presence of quicksand, the peculiar 
clay and silt formation in the tunnels, and the necessity of crossing 
Mill Creek, it was deemed expedient to proceed with the construc- 
tion of the sewer by day labor. This sewer has a total length of 
7,312 feet, with substantial diameters of 54 and 48 inches except at 
the Mill Creek crossing, where 36-inch cast-iron pipes have been 
laid. The total cost of the sewer was $214,451.71. This extension 
was completed and opened for service on October 8. 

The sewer built through portions of the city of Cambridge to the 
town of Belmont was completed under contract, on July 20. It has 
a length of 6,358 feet, and, though built in sections somewhat dif- 
ferent from each other, has a substantial diameter of 25 inches. The 
expenditures for this seAver to date have amounted to $56,550.69. 
There are remaining unpaid some small claims for land damages. 

(2) South Metropolitan System. 

The work of construction on the South Metropolitan System has 
consisted principally of the completion of the High-level Sewer. 
The sewer proper had been chiefly built before the beginning of the 
year, and considerable progress had been made in the erection of the 
necessary structures. During the year the larger portion of one of 
the two outfall pipes in the harbor, which remained to be placed, 
has been laid ; the superstructure of the screen-chamber and sand- 
catcher on Nut Island has been erected ; the Ward Street pumping 
station has been finished, and the pumps, engines and boilers have 
been installed ; the necessary connections between the High-level 
Sewer and the Charles River valley and the Neponset valley sewers 
have been made ; and the various unfinished portions of the sewer 
have been completed. 

The Ward Street pumping station was put in operation and the 
High-level Sewer was opened for service on October 14, since which 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 45 

date the sewage from the portion of the Charles River valley above 
Vancouver Street has been pumped and discharged through the 
sewer from the outfall into the harbor. 

Connection was made with the Neponset River valley sewer, at 
the junction of the sewers in Hyde Park, on November 22, and 
since that date the sewage from the Neponset River valley system 
above that point has also been discharged through the High-level 
Sewer. 

But little more remains to be done for the entire completion of 
the High-level Sewer. The chief work required is the laying of a 
force main in Quincy, for the purpose of connecting the Quincy 
pumping station with the sewer ; and this work will be begun as 
early as practicable in the coming season and will probably be per- 
formed by the employes in the maintenance department. Until this 
is finished the sewage from that station will continue to be disposed 
of through the Moon Island outfall of the city of Boston. 

The final grading of the grounds about the Ward Street station 
and also about the screen-chamber at Nut Island has necessarily 
been deferred until the coming season. 

A small portion of the territory in the Back Bay district of Bos- 
ton, situated below Vancouver Street, is still unconnected with the 
High-level Sewer ; and the making of this connection is awaiting 
arrangements which may be effected with the city of Boston for the 
mutual advantage of that city and of the Commonwealth, which 
will probably be determined early in the coming year. It is not 
proposed at present to discharge the sewage of small portions of 
Dorchester and Milton, included in the Neponset valley system with 
the High-level Sewer, as the areas are too low for sewage to be 
delivered into the High-level Sewer without pumping. Satisfac- 
tory arrangements for the disposal of the sewage of these small 
sections, which are not provided for by the High-level Sewer, have 
been made with the city of Boston. 

The expenditures for the High-level Sewer up to the present 
date have been $5,876,751.94. The appropriations for the sewer 
amounted to $5,981,000. The work to be done, which is com- 
paratively small in amount, will undoubtedly be accomplished 
within the appropriations. 

The High-level Sewer, which has now been substantially com- 
pleted, extends from near Ward Street in the city of Boston through 



46 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

portions of that city and through the towns of Hyde Park and Mil- 
ton and the city of Quincy to Nut [sland, a distance 4 of L6.83 miles. 
Of the total length, L 2. 7 5 -miles are constructed in open trench and 
t.08 miles in tunnel. Prom Nu1 Island the sewage is conveyed 
through two submarine 60-inch cast-iron pipes to points in the har- 
bor, each a little more than one mile beyond the low-water mark, 
where out falls have been built. The sewer has a capacity for the 
daily discharge of 300,000,000 gallons of sewage. 

Nut Island has been graded, and the soil removed was used prin- 
cipally in the construction of the embankment upon the bar con- 
necting Nut Island with Hough's Neck in Quincy. A building, 
principally of brick, about 7<s feet long, (50 feet wide and 40 feet in 
height, with a chimney 100 feet high, has been built upon the island. 
This building embraces a screen-chamber, where practically all the 
objectionable solid matters in the sewage will be intercepted, and a 
boiler room with boilers, which will provide the necessary steam for 
heating the building and operating the small engines for moving 
the screens. Approaching the building the sewer section has been 
considerably enlarged, so as to deposit sand which follows along 
the sewer. The solid matters intercepted at the screens will be 
burned in the boilers, and the arrangements are such that the 
sand may be removed from the sand-catcher before entering the 
outfall pipes. 

The Ward Street pumping station includes an engine house about 
65 by 120 feet, and a boiler room and accessories about 38 by 105 
feet. The height of the engine house is about 55 feet. It is con- 
structed of brick, with granite trimmings. Two pumping engines 
have been installed, each having a daily capacity for pumping 
50,000,000 gallons. The station is also equipped with the neces- 
sary boilers, screens and other machinery. 

(3) Purchases and Takings of Land. 
Only one taking, required for the purpose of the Quincy force 
main, has been made for the Metropolitan Sewerage Works during 
the year, being of easements in 1.68 acres, of which .89 acre was 
in a street. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWEEAGE BOARD. 



47 



List of Takings for Metropolitan Sewerage Works for the Year 1904. 



No. 


Location and Description. 


Former Owners. 


Recorded. 


Purpose of Taking. 


11 


Quincy (from Greenleaf Street north- 
erly through Park Lane to the east- 
erly line of the Metropolitan Park 
Reservation, then from the westerly 
line of the Reservation through 
Merrymount Park, to the Quirjcy 
pumping station). Area, easements 
in J .68 acres. 


City of Quincy et al. 


1904. 

Jan. 27. 


High-level Sewer 
(Quincy force main). 



Since January 1, 1904, settlements have been effected on account 
of the takings made in the North Metropolitan District in three 
cases, involving a payment of $1,550; and in cases in the South 
Metropolitan District two settlements have been effected, under 
which payments have been made amounting to $4,398.22. 

Summary of Land Settlements for the Year 1904. 



Location. 



Area in 
Acres. 



Number of 
Settlements. 



Payments. 



North Metropolitan District. 
Cambridge, 

Total, 

South Metropolitan District. 
Quincy, 

Total, 

Aggregate, . ... 



0.256 



f 1,550 CO 



0.256 
0.865 



$1,550 00 
$4,398 22 



0.865 
1.121 



K,398 22 
5,918 22 



VI. SEWERAGE WORKS — MAINTENANCE. 
(1) North Metropolitan System. 

The maintenance of the North Metropolitan S}^stem involves the 
care of 58.004 miles of Metropolitan main sewers, into which is 
received the sewage of the different municipalities of the District 
through 558.18 miles of local sewers, having 58,987 connections. 
There are maintained for this system four pumping stations, — the 
Alewife Brook pumping station at Somerville, the Charlestown 
pumping station, the East Boston pumping station and the Deer 
Island pumping station. The total number of gallons of sewage 
pumped during the year has been 53,739,119,000. The population 



48 METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 

of the various municipalities and parts of municipalities embraced in 
the North Metropolitan District is estimated at 494,500, of which it 
is estimated that a population of 387,327 is directly contributing 
sewage. The sewers in 1 2 of the municipalities arc separate sewers, 
in 5 municipalities separate and combined sewers, and in one munic- 
ipality combined sewers only. 

The average cost of pumping per million gallons raised 1 foot, 
including labor at the screens, was $0.3 19 at the Alewife Brook sta- 
tion, 80.159 at the Charlestown station, $0,065 at the East Boston 
station and $0,094 at the Deer Island station. 

During the past } r ear the wharf at Deer Island has been largely 
renewed, the water pipes at the station have been extended so as to 
provide additional fire protection for the dwelling houses and lock- 
ers, and considerable riprap has been deposited on the Deer Island 
bar over the line of the outfall sewer. Considerable repairs have 
been required at the ends of the Maiden River siphon and in the em- 
bankment across the marsh. Necessary changes have been made by 
which the old Mystic valley sewer in Winchester has been relieved. 

The expenditures for maintenance of the North Metropolitan Sys- 
tem for the year have amounted to $112,047.98. 

(2) South Metropolitan Systew. 

The Metropolitan sewers in the South Metropolitan System have 
a total length of 37.548 miles, and these receive the sewage of the 
District through 406.32 miles of local sewers, having 20,117 con- 
nections. 

The Ward Street pumping station, the Quincy pumping station 
and the screen-house and sand-catcher at Nut Island are also main- 
tained for this system. The number of gallons of sewage pumped 
during the year at the Quincy pumping station has been 1,338,- 
810,000, and at the Ward Street pumping station, from October 14 
to the end of the year, 1,002,900,000. The population of the 
various municipalities and parts of municipalities embraced in the 
South Metropolitan District is estimated at 318,300, and of this 
population it is estimated that 147,761 are now directly contributing 
sewage. Of the municipalities in the District, 7 have separate sewers 
and 5 separate and combined sewers. 

The average cost of pumping per million gallons raised 1 foot, 
including labor at the screens, was $0,151 at the Quincy station. 
Owing to the short time during which the Ward Street station has 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 49 

been in operation, the statistics regarding the cost of pumping at this 
station are not available. 

Considerable work will be required from the maintenance depart- 
ment on account of the recent completion of the High-level Sewer, 
the Ward Street pumping station and the screen-house at Nut Island, 
in equipping these works for regular operation. 

The sum of $139,640.88 has been expended during the year for 
the maintenance of the South Metropolitan System. 

VII. SEWERAGE WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 
(1) Construction Loans and Receipts. 
The appropriations for the construction of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works, the receipts which are added to the appropriations, 
and the expenditures for construction, have been as follows : — 

(a) North Metropolitan System. 

Appropriations under various acts of the Legislature (given in 

detail in report for the year 1901), f 5,605,865 73 

Appropriations under chapters 242, 336 and 399, Acts of 1903, . 500,000 00 
Proceeds from sales of property and from other sources to Decem- 
ber 31, 1904, 17,023 53 



1,122,889 26 



Amount approved by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and 
the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board for payment to 
December 31, 1904 (of which $184,655.82 is for the year 1904), . 6,086,569 91 

Balance, North Metropolitan System, January 1, 1905, . . f 36,319 35 

(&) South Metropolitan System. 

Charles River Valley Sewer. 

Appropriations under the Acts of the years 1889 and 

1900, - $800,046 27 

Amount approved by the Metropolitan Sewerage 

Commission for payment to December 31, 1904, . f 800,046 27 

Neponset River Valley Sewer. 

Appropriations under various acts of the Legislature 

(given in detail in report for the year 1901),. . - 900,000 00 

Appropriation, chapter 315, Acts of 1903, ... - 4,000 00 

Proceeds from pumping ground water, ... - 109 50 

Amount approved by the Metropolitan Sewerage 

Commission and the Metropolitan Water and 

Sewerage Board for payment to December 31, 1904 

(of which $150 is for the year 1904), . . . 903,464 26 



50 



METROPOLITAN WATEB 



[Pub. Doc. 



High-level Sewer. 

Appropriation under chapter 424 of the Acts of 1899, 
original loan, ........ 

Appropriation, chapter 356 of the Acts of 1903, 
Appropriations, chapters 280 and 24f> of the Acts of 

1904 

Proceeds from sales of property to December 31, 1904 
(of which $2,722.68 is for the year 1904), 

Amount approved by the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Commission and the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board for payment to December 31, 1904 
(of which $645,136.10 is for the year 1904), . . $5,876,751 94 



$4,600,000 00 

996,000 00 

392,000 00 

5,868 49 

$7,698,024 26 



Balance South Metropolitan System, January 1, 
1905 



7,580,262 47 



$117,761 79 



(c) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund. 

Tnder authority of chapter 122 of the Acts of 1899, and section 
14 of chapter 424 of the Acts of 1899, the Treasurer of the Com- 
monwealth was required to consolidate the sinking funds of all the 
Metropolitan sewerage loans into one fund, to be known as the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund. 

The sinking fund as thus established has amounted at the end of 
each year to sums as follows : — 



December 31, 1899, 
December 31, 1900, 
December 31, 1901, 



$361,416 59 
454,520 57 
545,668 26 



December 31, 1902, 
December 31, 1903, 
December 31, 1904, 



636,084 04 
754,690 41 
878,557 12 



(2) Annual Appropriations and Receipts. 

The annual appropriations for the maintenance of the Metropoli- 
tan Sewerage Works, the receipts of the Board which are added to 
the appropriations for maintenance,, and the expenditures for main- 
tenance for the year ending December 31, 1904, have been as 

follows : — 

North Metropolitan System. 

Balance January 1, 1904, 

Appropriation under chapter 62 of the Acts of 1904, 

Receipts from pumping and from other sources, .... 



$9,777 58 

123,000 00 

863 62 



Amount approved by the Board for payment, 



$133,641 20 
112,047 98 



Balance January 1, 1905, . . $21,593 22 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



51 



South Metropolitan System. 

Balance January 1, 1904, 

Appropriation under chapter 60 of the Acts of 1904, 
Receipts from sales of property and from pumping, 



Amount approved by the Board for payment, . 
Balance January 1, 1905, . 



$5,022 06 

135,000 00 

29 30 


$140,051 
139,640 


36 

88 



$410 48 



The Board has also received, from rentals and from other sources, 
to be applied by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth to the Metro- 
politan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund requirements, $75. 



(3) Annual Assessments. 
The amounts assessed by the State Treasurer upon the cities and 
towns of the Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, to meet interest and 
sinking fund requirements and to defray the cost of maintenance 
and operation of works, in accordance with the ratios determined 
by the apportionment commissioners appointed under chapter 439 
of the Acts of the year 1889 and chapter 424 of the Acts of the 
year 1899,* are as follows : — 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Arlington, 


$8,091 81 


Somerville, 


$50,404 54 


Belmont, . 


4,642 06 


Stoneham, 


4,962 06 


Boston, . 


64,732 13 


Wakefield, 


7,652 70 


Cambridge, 


86,891 58 


Winchester, 


7,730 03 


Chelsea, . 


24,449 79 


Winthrop, 


5,991 95 


Everett, . 


18,355 96 


Woburn, . 


10,712 66 


Lexington, 


2,483 43 
28,884 84 


Revere, . 


9,301 51 


luaiucUf . . i 




Medford, . 


17,918 64 


Total, 


f 364,949 84 


Melrose, . 


11,744 15 






So 


uth Metropolitan Sewerage System. 




Boston, . 


$154,201 46 


Quincy, . 


$24,698 31 


Brookline, 


53,933 77 


Waltham, 


25,189 36 


Dedham.f 


8,890 48 


Watertown, 


11,114 29 


Hyde Park, 


13,472 36 








Milton, . 


16,574 30 


Total, 


$360,696 29 


Newton, . 


52,621 96 







* Given in previous reports. 



t Exclusive of Westwood. 



52 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(4) Expenditures for the Different Works. 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the 
various operations for the different works : — 



Construction. 



For Year ending 
December 31, 1904. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1904. 



Worth Metropolitan System. 
Original system, maiu line and branches, 
Lexington branch, 
Everett branch, . 
Wakefield branch, 
Btoneham branch, 
Chelsea and Everett outlets, 
Wakefield branch extension, 
Revere extension, 
Belmont extension, 

Total North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan Syatem. 
Charles River valley sewer, main line, 
Neponset River valley sewer, main line, 
Brookline branch, .... 
Total, 



High-level Sewer : — 
8ection 43, Quincy, .... 
Section 44, Quincy, .... 

8ection 45, Quincy 

Section 46, Quincy 

Section 47, Quincy, .... 
Section 48, Quincy, .... 
Sections 48 and 49, Quincy, . 
Section 49, Quincy, .... 

Section 50, Quincy 

Section 51, Quincy, * 

Section 52, Quincy, .... 
Section 53, Quincy, .... 
Section 54, Quincy, .... 
Section 55, Quincy and Milton, 
Section 56, Milton, .... 

Section 57, Milton 

Section 58, Milton, .... 
Section 59, Milton, .... 
Section 60, Milton, .... 
Section 61, Milton, .... 
Section 62, Milton, .... 
Section 63, Milton, .... 
Section 64, Neponset River crossing, 
Section 65, Hyde Park, . 
Section 66, Hyde Park, . 
Section 67, Hyde Park, Stony Brook cross 

ins 

Section 68, Hyde Park and Roxbury, 

Section 69, West Roxbury, 

Section 70, West Roxbury, 

>ection 71, West Roxbury, 

Section 72, West Roxbury, 

Section 73, West Roxbury, 

8ection 74, West Roxbury and Roxbury, 

Section 75, Roxbury 

Section 76, Roxbury, cast-iron force main, 
Section 77, Roxbury, Ward Street pumping 

station, 

Section 78, Roxbury, connecting sewer, 

Quincy force main, . 

Charles River valley studies, 

Real estate, 

Apportionment Commission, 

Administration, 

Total, .... 



Total, South Metropolitan System, 



Total for construction, both systems, 



$5,508 70 



153,833 37 
25,313 75 



$50 00 
100 00 



$157,743 97 
103,394 25 

6,681 59 

118 00 

49,101 13 

4,694 28 

220 00 

175 05 

80 53 

10 00 

1,735 05 

128 71 

72 13 

29 85 

58 00 

89 37 

112 93 

230 76 

169 12 

100 00 

50 00 

91 00 

108 00 

52 24 

62 50 

1 50 

5,567 04 
1,069 06 
52 42 
2,691 31 
8,900 34 

275,486 61 
4,272 49 
8,564 98 
3,889 71 
5,389 85 

4,942 33 



$184,655 82 



$150 00 



$5,383,932 67 
68,585 15 
54,877 12 
35,698 29 
11,574 10 
71,016 41 
189,883 77 
214,451 71 
56,550 69 



645,136 10 



$645,286 10 



$829,941 92 



$6,086,569 91 



$866,545 66 
36,918 60 



$401,988 99 
290,698 78 

76,139 36 

61,857 20 
109,786 58 
295,319 29 

81,548 64 
169,020 18 
109,570 35 

87,203 68 
155,800 65 

98,042 42 
101,918 39 
305,261 34 
105,042 50 

68,783 24 

94,089 72 
104,444 62 

60,796 13 
129,598 76 
129,557 28 
127,046 45 

47,499 40 

40,695 84 
252,952 72 

32,243 33 

78,493 62 
102,033 68 
131,375 55 

91,888 22 
127,881 76 
494,258 92 
147,296 69 
136,192 99 

79,998 39 

497,024 53 

35,844 69 

8,682 01 

3,889 71 

354,442 11 

2,000 00 

48,543 23 



$800,046 27 



903,464 26 



5,876,751 94 
$7,580,262 47 



$13,666,832 38 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



53 



Maintenance. 


For Year ending 
December 31, 1904. 


From Beginning 

of "Work to 

December 31, 1904. 




$112,047 98 
139,640 88 


$895,262 40 
790,280 27 




$251,688 86 


$1,685,542 67 





(5) Detailed Financial Statement. 

The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Acts, an abstract of the expenditures and disbursements, 
receipts, assets and liabilities for the year ending December 31, 
1904: — 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For Year ending 

December 31, 

1904. 



North Metropolitan System — Construction 
Commissioners, 

Secretary, engineer and auditor, 
Clerical services, . 
Rent of office, Ashburton Place, 
Engineering supplies, . 
Office supplies, 

Engineers, inspectors, rodmen, laborers and others, 
Postage, telephone and telegrams, 
Books, maps, plans, blue prints and photography, 
Carriage hire and travelling expenses, 
Teaming and express, . . . 

Tools and repairs of same, 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies, . 
Contracts : — 

Jones & Meehan, old, 

Revere Extension : — 

Mayo Contracting Co., Sects. 61 and 62, 

Charles A. Haskin, Sects. 61 and 62, 
Belmont Extension : — 

Gow & Palmer, Sect. 63, .... 
Land takings, purchase and recording, . 
Experts and appraisers, 



Total, 



Neponset River Valley Sewer 
Contracts : — 

Edw. W. Everson, old, . 
Brookline branch : — 
Experts and appraisers, . 



Construction. 



f 1,166 66 
595 83 
745 33 
600 00 
134 41 
143 71 

62,523 28 
419 40 
38 95 
366 83 
197 95 
201 09 

43,346 71 

32 00 

9,400 07 
37,191 58 

20,276 30 

7,219 72 

56 00 



Total, 



$184,655 82 

$50 00 

100 00 

$150 00 



;>i 



MKTKOmUTAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 





For Year ending 


1 . IM NKHTIKKS. 


Deoembei 81, 

1904. 


High-level Sewer — Construction. 




Commissioners, 


$1,166 67 


Secretary, engineer and auditor, ..... 






3,512 49 


Clerical services, ........ 






1/236 33 


Engineers, inspectors, rodmen, laborers and others, 






49,224 80 


Advertising, 






13 88 


Office supplies, 






150 07 


Postage, telephone and telegrams, 






439 17 


Hooks, maps, plans, blue prints and photography, 






199 32 


Engineering instruments and repairs of same, 






5 50 


Engineering supplies, ....... 






440 31 


Carriage hire and travelling expenses, 






1,218 99 


Repairs, fittings and supplies, main office, . 






699 94 


Rent of office, Pemberton Building, .... 






2,812 50 


Rent of ollice, Ashburton Place, 






486 40 


Rent of wharf, Quincy, . 






1,000 00 


Teaming and express, . 






1,127 23 


Briek, cement, lumber and other field supplies, . 






43,590 02 


Tools and repairs of same, 






1,108 79 


Contracts : — 








Hiram W. Phillips, Sect. 43 






94,716 96 


Camden Iron Works, Sect. 43, 






56,091 28 


Edward Kendall & Sons, Sect. 44, . 






6,315 00 


Lockw r ood Manufacturing Co., Sect. 44, . 






10,932 70 


Wm. 11. Ellis, Sect. 44, 






33,605 77 


Woodbury & Leighton Co., Sect. 44, . 






28,440 00 


Wm. H. Ellis, Sect. 46, 






4,922 53 


Chas G. Belden & Co., Sect. 48, .... 






39,748 85 


Joseph J. Moebs, Sect. 48, 






7,113 55 


Chas. G Belden & Co., Sect. 49, .... 






4,312 58 


E. W. Everson & Co., Sect. 62, 






100 00 


H. P. Nawn, Sect. 73 (part), 






604 12 


E. W. Everson & Co., Sect. 75 (part), 






2,648 88 


H. P. Nawn, Sect, 76, 






7,991 23 


L. P. Soule & Son, Sect. 77, building, 






57,375 15 


Allis-Chalmers Co., Sect. 77, pumps, 






153,000 00 


Lockwood Manufacturing Co., Sect. 77, .... 






9,513 20 


Camden Iron Works, Quincy force main, .... 






7,291 67 


Land takings, purchase and recording, .... 






4,569 50 


Experts and appraisers, ....... 






960 00 


Legal services, 






200 72 


Claims and allowances on contracts, .... 






6,250 00 


Total, 


$645,136 10 


North Metropolitan System — Maintenance. 




Administration : — 




Commissioners, secretary, auditor and assistants, 


$2,507 85 


Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 


27 18 


Rent, telephone, heating, lighting and care of offices, 


279 09 


Miscellaneous expenses, 


666 44 


Amount carried forward, 


$3,480 56 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



55 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For Year ending- 
December 31, 

1904. 



e of offices, 



electric 



ght 



Amount brought forward^ 

North Metropolitan System — Maintenance — Concluded. 
General superintendence : — 

Engineer and assistants, 

Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Rent, telephone, heating, lighting and can 

Miscellaneous expenses, 
Deer Island pumping station : — 

Labor, . 

Coal, . 

Oil and waste, 

Water, . 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones and office supplies, 

Care and repairs of building and grounds 
and miscellaneous expenses, 
East Boston pumping station 

Labor, .... 

Coal, .... 

Oil and waste, . 

Water, .... 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones and office supplies, 

Care and repairs of building and grounds 
and miscellaneous expenses, 
Charlestown pumping station : — 

Labor, . 

Coal, . 

Oil and waste, 

Water, . 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones and office supplies, 

Care and repairs of building and grounds 
and miscellaneous expenses, 
Alevvife Brook pumping station : — 

Labor, 

Coal, 



Oil and waste, 
Water, . 
Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 
Telephones and office supplies, 
Care and repairs of building and 
and miscellaneous expenses, 
Sewer lines, labor, . 
Supplies and expenses, 
Horses, vehicles and stable account, 

Total, 



grounds, 



electric li 



electric li 



electric li 



srht 



plant 



p;ht 



plant 



plant 



ght plant 



$3,480 56 



4,110 


12 


83 


31 


476 


20 


292 


56 


11,296 50 


8,863 


16 


444 


42 


1,209 


60 


72 


30 


436 


94 


337 


66 


3,388 


94 


10,481 


68 


9,248 


14 


335 


04 


940 


80 


11 


78 


312 


99 


303 


87 



2,751 76 

10,326 04 
4,103 91 
329 87 
410 40 
76 77 
235 92 
317 46 

2,263 72 

3,346 13 
1,705 61 
124 75 
242 40 
19 77 
216 56 
160 87 

808 24 

17,512 86 

6,768 84 

4,199 53 

$112,047 98 



56 



MKTKOmLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc, 



UKNKRAl. CHABAOTBB <<K r.\l'KM'lllJRI8. 



For Year ending 
December II, 

li»04. 



South Metropolitan System — Maintenance. 
Administration \ — 

Commissioners, secretary, auditor and assistants, 

Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Kent, telephone, heating, lighting and care of building, . 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

General superintendence : — 

Engineer and assistants, 

Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Rent, telephone, heating, lighting and care of offices, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Sewer lines, labor, 

Supplies and expenses, 

City of Boston, for pumping and interest, ... 
Quincy pumping station : — 

Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil and waste, 

Water 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones and office supplies, 

Care and repairs of building and grounds, lighting and mis- 
cellaneous expenses, 

City of Boston, for discharge of sewage, 

Ward Street pumping station : — 

Labor, 

Coal 

Oil and waste, , 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones and office supplies, 

Care of building and grounds, lighting and miscellaneous ex- 
penses, 

Nut Island screen-house : — 

Labor, ............ 

Coal 

Oil and waste, 

Packing, 

Telephones and office supplies, 

Care of building and grounds, lighting and miscellaneous ex- 
penses, 

Horses, vehicles and stable account, 

Total, 



$2,91:3 


67 


105 47 


1,003 


46 


680 


41 


2,188 


57 


46 


43 


1,064 


37 


17 


50 


14,192 


35 


6,301 


68 


85,196 


24 


3,887 


42 


2,461 


89 


44 


60 


248 70 


39 


84 


241 


13 


228 06 


348 


61 


1,000 00 


4,794 89 


2,139 


34 


402 


69 


126 


00 


103 


48 


70 


76 


97 


13 


2,520 47 


1,180 


74 


1,036 50 


31 


60 


15 


75 


163 


99 


1,229 


31 


3,517 


83 


$139,640 


88 



(b) Receipts. 

The receipts from the sales of property, from rents and from other 
sources, have been credited as follows : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



57 





For Year ending 

December 31, 

1904. 


From Beginning of 

Work to December 

31, 1904. 


North Metropolitan System, — construction, 
South Metropolitan System, — construction, 
North Metropolitan System, — maintenance, 
South Metropolitan System, — maintenance, 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund, 


$496 80 

2,722 68 

863 62 

29 30 

75 00 


$17,023 53 

5,977 99 

5,355 53 

141 86 

760 20 


Totals, 


$4,187 40 


$29,259 11 



(c) Assets. 
The folio wino; is an abstract of the assets of the Sewerage Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies ; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies ; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc. ; machinery, tools and 
other appliances and supplies ; real estate connected with works not com- 
pleted ; completed works, including real estate connected therewith. 



(c?) Liabilities. 
There are liabilities as follows : — 

Current bills unpaid, $7,238 09 

Due on monthly pay rolls, 673 89 



$7,911 98 

Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or 

until Claims are settled. 



Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


North Metropolitan Construction : — 

H. A. Hanscom & Co., 

Chas. A. Haskin, .... 
High-level Sewer : — 

Lockwood Manufacturing Co., 

H. W. Phillips, .... 

Woodbury & Leighton Co., 

H. P. Nawn 

J. W. Iiustin &Co., . 

E. W & J. J. Everson, . 

National Contracting Co., 

E. W. Everson & Co 

Allis -Chalmers Co., 

Lockwood Manufacturing Co., 


Sect. 56, held for claims, 
Sect. 61 

Sect, 43, screen machinery, . 
Sect. 43, outlet, pipe laying, 
Sect. 44, screen-house, . 
Sect. 55, .... 
Sect. 57, reserved for repairs, 
Sect. 66, 

Sect. 73, contract abandoned, 
Sect. 75, .... 
Sect. 77, .... 
Sect. 77, .... 


$200 00 
638 40 

1,929 30 
9,705 23 
1,500 00 
1,500 00 
100 00 
1,000 00 
5,516 17 
2,000 00 
51,000 00 
1,678 80 




$76,767 90 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

On the claims of the following it is impossible to state the 
amounts due for Land and other damages, as no sums have been 
agreed upon, and suits arc now pending in (lie courts for the deter- 
mination of most of them : — 

ILolvhood Cemetery Association, Mary C. Eichorn, (Jlemence 
W, Hasenfus, Jackson et a?., trustees, Caroline S. Skinner, heirs of 
John Friel, Boston Elevated Railway Company, heirs of John Gil- 
more, Boston & Maine Railroad, Mary Rohan, Mary E. Connolly, 
National Contracting Company, Jacob M. Mason, Martin Dings, 
Bernard Dully. Anna I,. Dunican, Edward Duffy, Joseph II. Duffy, 
Mary R. Dully, William J. Butty, Maurice Duffy, Bernard Duffy, 
administrator, Emma Dings, Carrie S. Urquhart, N. Jefferson 
Urquhart, Edwin N. Urquhart, Mary Doherty, Mary E. Doherty, 
Richard Jones, James Doherty, Michael Niland, Ercd W. Baker, 
Catherine A. Raker, Walter J. Baker, Freda E. Baker. 

VIII. CONSUMPTION OF WATER. 

The rainfall of the year was considerably below the average, but 
as this deficiency occurred entirely during the last three months of 
the year, the yield of the watersheds constituting the sources of 
supply for the District was but little below the yearly average. 

There was, however, a decided increase in the quantity of water 
consumed. The average daily rate of consumption in the cities and 
towns supplied by the Metropolitan Works during the year was 
114, 871), 000 gallons, — an increase of 7,728,000 gallons over that 
of the preceding year. Although there was an increase in con- 
sumption throughout the year, the larger part of the increase 
occurred during the colder months of January, February, March 
and December. The daily rate of consumption per person was 123 
gallons, — or 4 gallons more than the rate of the preceding year. 

While the extreme cold of the winter months contributed to make 
a larger average consumption, the summer was unusually moderate 
and cool, so that there was less than the usual waste of water through 
the use of hand hose and lawn sprinklers, and the Board was called 
upon to complain of but few violations of the regulations adopted 
regarding their use. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 59 



IX. THE MEASUREMENT OF WATER SUPPLIED TO THE 
VARIOUS MUNICIPALITIES, AND THE INVESTIGATION 
OF UNNECESSARY AND IMPROPER USE OR WASTE. 

The measurement of the water supplied to each municipality in 
the District which the Board was, by the installation of the Venturi 
meters, enabled to make during the latter half of the preceding year, 
has been continued throughout the past year, and the results of the 
measurements are given in connection with the report of the Chief 
Engineer. 

A similar variation to that previously reported is shown in the 
consumption of water in the different municipalities of the District. 
The towns of Milton and Belmont, in which all the services are 
metered, and the city of Maiden, in which the services are about 
five-sixths metered, show a daily per capita consumption respectively 
of 41, 49 and 46 gallons. Other municipalities in which but a small 
proportion of the services are metered have much greater per capita 
consumption, the number of gallons consumed daily per capita in 
the cities of Quincy, Melrose, Chelsea and Boston being respectively 
as high as 101, 106, 113 and 143. * 

The records of the Venturi meters enable the engineers and local 
authorities to detect the existence of leaks in the pipes, and to deter- 
mine the quantities of water used otherwise than for ordinary con- 
sumption. In one municipality an increase of consumption in a 
single day from 400,000 to 1,000,000 gallons was recorded. This 
increase was found to be due to a broken 8-inch pipe, causing a 
leakage which might otherwise have continued for a long time with- 
out detection. The records taken likewise disclose the fact that in 
the whole District during the extreme cold months of January and 
February of the past year, between the hours of 1 and 4 in the morn- 
ing when the necessary use of water was at a minimum, the actual 
rate of consumption for the three hours was greater than that for the 
entire day during the summer months. The results indicated an 
absolute waste in many parts of the District by reason of defective 
fixtures, or of allowing the water continually to run in order to 
avoid the freezing of the pipes. 

The Legislature of last year, in acting upon the special report of 
the Board, by the enactment of chapter 426 of the Acts of 1904, 



60 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

amended the provisions of the Metropolitan Water Act so as to 
provide that on and after the year 1906 the assessments upon all 
the municipalities of the District, other than the city of Boston, 
shall be laid one-third in proportion to their respective valuations 
and two-thirds in proportion to the quantities of water respectively 
consumed by them in the preceding year, thereby substituting con- 
sumption as an element of assessment, instead of population. In 
accordance, therefore, with this act, the measurements of water used 
by the cities and towns other than Boston during the current year, 
will be taken as important factors in determining the amounts of the 
assessments. 

The Board is still of the opinion that a large proportion of the 
water now supplied to the District, amounting to from one-third to 
one-half of the entire quantity afforded, is unnecessarily used or 
wasted, and that it is possible and practicable to prevent the greater 
part of such unnecessary use or waste. The means of prevention 
are largely in the hands of the local authorities. By the introduc- 
tion of meters, a rigorous inspection, and the speedy prevention of 
leakage and waste when discovered, a great reduction in consump- 
tion can be attained. It is still believed that both the municipality 
and the individual water taker can be interested in the checking of 
waste and excessive use by causing water rates to be largely de- 
pendent upon the quantity of water which is consumed. 

X. ELECTROLYSIS. 

Investigations have been continued in order to ascertain more 
definitely the extent of the injury done to the water pipes by the 
underground electric currents, and for the purpose of devising 
means by which such injurious effects may be overcome or largely 
reduced. 

The most serious effects of the electric current upon the pipes have 
been found, as heretofore, in the vicinity of the power stations of 
the different electric railway companies. In one instance the iron 
of the pipe was so pitted and decomposed as to render hazardous its 
longer continuance, and the water main for a distance of 539 feet 
was relaid. Pipes have been uncovered and examined at various 
other points, but in this place only had the deterioration proceeded 
so far as to make necessary the immediate relaying of the pipe. 

Experiments which have been made in applying to the pipes 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 61 

affected an insulating covering of asphalt and burlap have not 
seemed to be successful. Some success has attended the installa- 
tion of insulating joints in pipes which have been particularly 
affected, but the observations have not been carried far enough to 
determine to what extent the application of insulating joints will 
cause a reduction of electrolytic action. 

The legal proceedings which have been begun to reimburse and 
to protect the Commonwealth on account of such injuries have been 
delayed to await further the results of the experiments, in which the 
Board has been willing to cooperate with the railway corporations. 

XI. FUTURE EXTENSION OF THE HIGH-LEVEL SEWER TO 
BROOKLINE, BRIGHTON AND NEWTON. 

The Board was authorized, by chapter 230 of the Acts of the year 
1904, " to determine the location, elevation and size of the high-level 
metropolitan sewer above the point where the sewage from the Charles 
river valley is to be received," and a special appropriation for this 
purpose, to the amount of $7,000, was made. This act called upon 
the Board to make the proper surveys and investigations necessary 
to fix the location of this extension. The proposed extension begins 
at a point near Jamaica Pond in West Roxbury and proceeds north- 
westerly to the town of Brookline, then continues in the same gen- 
eral direction through that town to the Brighton line, and thence in 
a general westerly direction through Brighton and the city of New- 
ton, to the Charles River. 

The High-level Sewer, designed to receive only separate sewage, 
which extends from the connection with the Charles River valley 
system in the vicinity of the Ward Street pumping station in Rox- 
bury to Nut Island and Boston harbor, was built under the provisions 
of chapter 424 of the Acts of the year 1899, in accordance with the 
recommendations made by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission 
in its special report of that year upon the subject. It was stated 
that the Charles River valley sewer as then already constructed 
would probably be sufficient for a number of years to provide for 
portions of Brookline, Brighton and Newton ; but it was within the 
scheme recommended that eventually an extension of the High-level 
Sewer would be required for these districts, and the location of such 
an extension was examined, and a suggested general route was traced 
upon the plans then submitted. 



62 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The necessity o{' definitely fixing the location of the local sewers 
which are called for by the growing population of these higher re- 
gions, especially those which are to be built for the separate system 
of sewerage which will in the future be required to discharge into 
this extension of the Biffh-level Sewer, caused the Legislature to 
pass the act of last year. 

The surveys and investigations have been made in accordance 
with the requirements of that act, and a proper location of the pro- 
posed extension has been fixed by the Engineer of the Sewerage 
Works and approved by the Board. The report of the Engineer, 
showing this location and the proposed elevation and size of the 
sewer, together with the estimated cost of the construction of the 
various sections of the work, is made a part of his general report to 
the Board, and is published herewith. 

The route selected for the extension starts from a point in the 
present High-level Sewer in West Roxbury near Jamaica Pond, at 
the corner of Perkins and Centre streets, and, in general, proceeds 
by tunnel through Perkins Street, passing near Jamaica Pond and 
across the line into Brookline ; then under Chestnut, Kendall and 
Cypress streets, crossing under Walnut Street, to near Boylston 
Street ; then by open cut in a route which passes through Gorham 
Avenue and Park Street, by tunnel through Winchester Street, and 
by open cut through Columbia Street to the Brighton line. In 
Brighton the route passes by open cut through Columbia Street 
and Commonwealth Avenue, and by tunnel under Warren and 
Cambridge streets and a portion of Washington Street, and con- 
tinues by open cut through Washington and Tremont streets to the 
Newton line. In Newton the route passes through Tremont Street 
and other short streets to Newton ville Avenue, thence by tunnel 
under Mt. Ida to Cabot Park, and then by tunnels and open cuts 
through Newtonville and West Newton to the Charles River at New- 
ton Lower Falls. 

The total length of the proposed location is 10.18 miles. About 
5.30 miles are in tunnel and 4.88 miles in open cut. 

Particular attention has been given to that portion of the sewer 
which extends from the junction of the High-level Sewer in West 
Roxbury through Brookline to Oak Square in Brighton. It is 
anticipated that the further extension through the cit}' of Newton 
will not be required for a considerable period to come. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 63 

The portion of the sewer located in West Roxbury and Brookline 
and in Brighton to Oak Square has a length of 24,750 feet, or 4.69 
miles. Although sections at various places would differ in form, 
its size would vary from substantial diameters of about 6 feet to 7 
leet. The elevation at the highest point, at Oak Square, in Brighton, 
would be 41.13 feet above Boston City Base, and at the junction with 
the High-level Sewer, 31.5 feet above Boston City Base, or 21.5 
feet above high water in Boston harbor. 

The district which would be affected by the construction of this 
entire extension of the High-level Sewer has an area of 48.57 square 
miles, having an estimated population of 153,250. At present all 
or nearly all of the sewage of this area is contributory to the 
Charles River valley sewer, and the sewage thus received has to be 
pumped at the Ward Street station into the High-level Sewer. It 
is, however, estimated that an area of 20.26 square miles, having 
now an estimated population of 45,350, which is likely to increase 
largely in the future, can by the proposed extension be discharged 
by gravity into the High-level Sewer, and in this manner all costs 
for pumping can be saved. 

The estimated cost of the entire extension, as given by the 
Engineer, is $1,889,906 ; and the cost of that portion in West Rox- 
bury, Brookline and Brighton, which will first be required, is esti- 
mated at $1,168,928. 

It is evident that the time is fast approaching when the volume 
of sewage discharged into the Charles River valley sewer, which 
provides for the territory in question, will have reached the limit 
of the capacity of that sewer, and that the relief which had for- 
merly been proposed by the extension of the High-level system 
into the upper portions of the territory will have to be afforded. 

It was estimated, when the Charles River valley sewer was built, 
in the year 1892, that it would provide for an anticipated popula- 
tion of 183,000. The present population of the district now tribu- 
tary to this sewer is about 153,000, and is rapidly increasing. The 
maximum per capita rate of sewage, or 225 gallons a day, which 
was taken for the basis of the studies made previous to the year 
1892, has already been exceeded in the ordinary wet weather flows. 
Although the Charles River valley sewer was built to receive only 
separate sewage from much of the territory tributary to it, in 
periods of storms there is necessarily a considerable increase by 



64 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pui». Doc. 

mid flow and otherwise, so that at such periods the amount dis- 
charged into the sewer La now nearly equal to its capacity; and 
there is danger that in a comparatively few years this sewer will be 
at times overcharged, and the sewage will overflow so as to become 
offensive to portions of the District, particularly in Brighton and 
Brookiine, through which the sewer passes. An additional advantage 
will be gained by the construction of the proposed extension, in that 
sewage which will be received into it wall be discharged by gravity, 
and considerable expense will be saved in the cost of pumping. 

Inasmuch as the construction of the extension to Oak Square 
will require a period of two or three years after its building is 
authorized, an early consideration of the subject is important. 

XII. FUTURE WORK. 

The construction of the Wachusett Dam and the Wachusett Res- 
ervoir has proceeded so far that there seems but little doubt that 
both the dam and reservoir will in the coming year be substantial [y 
completed and made ready for use, so as to leave only some small 
subsidiary work to be subsequently performed. 

If decided measures are taken by the municipalities of the Met- 
ropolitan District for the reduction of the present excessive con- 
sumption, the necessity of proceeding to new T sources of water supply 
and of building further reservoirs and aqueducts will be delayed tor 
a considerable period to come. It certainly behooves the various 
municipalities of the District, which have the control of the distribu- 
tion of water, to promote and adopt such reasonable measures as 
>hall postpone the necessity of providing new sources of supply 
and additional works therefor, and to prevent the imposition upon 
the people of burdens which are unnecessary. 

Considerable additional work will probably be required for the 
abatement of sources of pollution to the w r ater supply, for enforc- 
ing measures for stopping improper and unnecessary consumption 
of water through waste and leakage, and for the prevention of the 
deterioration of water mains arising from electrolytic action. The 
building of the improvement of Spot Pond Brook, called for by 
the legislation of last year, is dependent upon the decision of a 
commission to be appointed by the court. A petition for the 
appointment of such a commission has been made, but no action 
has yet been taken thereon. 



No. 57.]. 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



65 



With the exception of the suits of the cities of Maiden, Medford 
and Melrose for damages on account of the taking of Spot Pond 
and the adjacent lands, there remain unsettled comparatively few 
claims for damages on account of the taking of lands for the works, 
for the diversion of water, for depreciation to real estate and for 
damages to business. It is probable that nearly all of these claims 
can be settled during the coming year. 

The construction of the High-level Sewer and of the extensions 
of the North Metropolitan System of sewerage to the towns of 
Revere and Belmont has nearly completed all the sewerage works 
at present authorized. The laying of the force main from the 
Quincy sewerage pumping station to connect with the High-level 
Sewer will be accomplished early in the year. 

The Board is charged with the operation and maintenance of all 
the various works for the supply of water to the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict and for the disposal of the sewage. The amount required for 
maintenance and operation during the past year exceeded $550,000, 
and the putting into complete operation of the Wachusett Reservoir 
and of the High-level Sewer will add materially to this department 
of the work of the Board. 

The report of the Chief Engineer, relating to the Water Works, 
and the report of the Engineer of the Sewerage Works, are here- 
with presented. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Boston, March 11, 1905. 



HENRY H. SPRAGUE. 
HENRY P. WALCOTT. 
JAMES A. BAILEY, Jr. 



66 METROPOLITAN WATEB [£ul>. Doc. 



KM PORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen : — The following is a report of the operations of the 
engineering Department of the Metropolitan Water Works for the 
year ending December 31, 1904. 

Organization. 

Dexter Brackett, Engineer of the Distribution Department, was 
on March 10 also placed in charge of the Sudbury Department and 
of the maintenance of the Weston Aqueduct, and on May '1^ was 
placed in charge of completing the work of construction connected 
with the Weston Aqueduct. In connection with these changes he 
was given the title of Engineer of Sudbury and Distribution De- 
partments. 

Horace Hopes, Engineer of the Weston Aqueduct Department, 
after having substantially completed the work under his charge, re- 
signed on May 25 to accept a position on the New York Water 
Works. The department was then abolished, and the work remain- 
ing to be done was placed in charge of Mr. Brackett, as already 
stated. 

Charles E. Wells, Engineer of the Reservoir Department, ten- 
dered his resignation toward the end of the year, to take effect in 
January, 1905, in order to accept an appointment on the Reclama- 
tion Service of the United States Geological Survey ; and the work 
of his department will on January 1 be placed in charge of Thomas 
F. Richardson, Engineer of the Dam and Aqueduct Department, 
with the new title, Engineer of Dam and Reservoir Department. 

Chester W. Smith, Division Engineer and Chief Inspector at the 
Wachusett Dam, resigned December 10 to accept a position on the 
Reclamation Service of the United States Geological Survey. 

Charles E. Haberstroh, Assistant Superintendent, Sudbury De- 
partment, now reports to Mr. Brackett, instead of directly to the 
Chief Engineer. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 67 

Charles W. Sherman, Division Engineer, tendered his resigna- 
tion, which took effect September 30, to accept another position. 

William W. Locke, Sanitary Inspector, who formerly reported 
to the department engineers, now- reports directly to the Chief En- 
gineer. 

The list of assistants reporting directly to the Chief Engineer at 
the end of the year is as follows : — 

Dexter Brackett, . . Engineer of Sudbury and Distribution Departments. 

Thomas F. Richardson, . Engineer of Dam and Aqueduct Department. 

Charles E. Wells, . . Engineer of Reservoir Department. 

William W. Locke, . . Sanitary Inspector. 

Frank T. Daniels, . . Principal Office Assistant. 

Samuel E. Kill am, . . Office Assistant. 

Joseph P. Davis and Hiram F. Mills have continued as consulting 
engineers. 

At the beginning of the year the engineering force, including 
those engaged upon both the construction and maintenance of the 
works, numbered 153, and at the end of the year 105. 

In addition to the engineering force, which included the engi- 
neers engaged upon the inspection of the work, other inspectors 
have been employed upon masonry and earthwork. The maximum 
number so employed at any time during the year was 11. 

Gangs of men, under the immediate direction of foremen and 
under the general direction of the engineers, have been employed 
from time to time to do minor work, the more important items of 
which were the grouting with cement of two large arch bridges of 
the Boston & Maine Railroad over the Stillwater and Quinepoxet 
rivers ; the cleaning of a large portion of the Wachusett Reservoir, 
preparatory to filling it with water ; cementing and otherwise treat- 
ing the rock at the bottom of the cut-off trench of the South Dike ; 
the construction of additional settling basins and beds at the Clinton 
sewage disposal works ; and the fencing, seeding and other work 
connected with the completion of the Weston Aqueduct. 

There has also been a maintenance force, exclusive of engineers, 
averaging 202, employed at the pumping stations and in connection 
with the maintenance of reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines and other 
work. 



68 



METROPOLITAN WATEB 



[Pub. Doc. 



Force Employed on Works, 

The force employed upon the works in r.toi was smaller than the 
force employed in 1903. 

The Largest force employed upon the works at any one time dur- 
ing the year was for the week ending June 1 1, as follows : — 



109 
118 



Contractors' forces: — 

Reservoir Department 

Dam and Aqueduct Department, 

Day- labor forces, construction 

Engineering force, including engineer inspectors and those engaged upon 

maintenance, 

Inspectors not engineers, 

Maintenance force, not including engineers, 




Horses. 



227 
30 



22 

279 



Arrangement of Report. 

In continuing this report, it is the purpose to separate the work 
charged to the construction account from that charged to the main- 
tenance account ; but, as the work of construction and maintenance 
is supervised by the same principal engineers, and in very many 
cases the assistants are engaged upon both classes of work, it is not 
feasible to make a complete separation. 



CONSTRUCTION. 

Contracts. 
A detailed statement of the contracts made and pending during 
the year is given in Appendix No. 1. The following statement 
gives a summary of all the contracts charged to construction from 
the beginning of the work to the end of the year 1904 : — 



Portion of Wokk. 



Number of 
Contracts. 




Approximate 
Amount. 



Wachusett Reservoir, 
Wachusett Dam, 
Other portions of work, 

Totals, 



$2,949,045 92 

1,740,215 86 

10,287,854 53 

$14,977,116 31 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 69 

Amount of 6 contracts made in 1904 (approximate), .... $95,541 26 
Amount of 3 contracts unfinished December 31, 1904 (approximate), 2,388,635 00 
Value of work done by contract from January 1, 1904, to December 

31, 1904, 1,154,851 57 

In the case of all contracts completed up to the present time final 
settlements have been made without any legal controversy. 



RESERVOIR DEPARTMENT. 

(The statement of the work of this department has been prepared by Charles E. Wells, Department 

Engineer.) 

The principal work of this department during the year has been 
the continuation of the removal of soil from the Wachusett Reservoir 
and its disposal in the North Dike and in shallow flowage and high- 
way embankments, the completion of the North Dike, the construc- 
tion of highways in "West Boylston and Oakdale, and the practical 
completion of the work connected with the relocation, raising and 
protection of the railroads at Oakdale. 

The organization of the engineering force has been the same as 
during the latter part of the previous year. Charles A. Bowman, 
division engineer, has continued in charge of the force reports, 
measurements, estimates and miscellaneous engineering work con- 
nected with the removal of soil, and also in charge of maintenance 
and forestal work. Harry J. Morrison, division engineer, has con- 
tinued in charge of the inspection of the removal of soil from the 
reservoir below West Boylston and the supervision of contractors. 
Ernest H. Baldwin, division engineer, has continued in charge of 
the work at and near Oakdale. Frederick W. Harris, assistant 
engineer, has had charge of the work at the North Dike and the 
miscellaneous day-labor work in that vicinity. Edwin J. Pickwick, 
assistant engineer, has had charge of the work connected with the 
relocation of roads and removal of soil at West Boylston. 

The total engineering force of this department has varied in num- 
ber from 57 to 47, the latter being the number at the end of the 
year. 

The main office of this department is at Clinton. Three branch 
offices, two at West Boylston and one at Oakdale, have been con- 
tinued throughout the year. 



70 



METROPOLITAN WATEB 



[Pub. Doc. 



North Dike. 

Work upon the North Dike has been in progress during the 
year under the contractors, the Newell & Snowling Construction 
Company and the Mc Arthur Brothers Company, and is now com- 
pleted. 

The amount of work done during the year, also the total amount 
done to complete the dike, are given in the following statement: — 



To December 
31, 1903. 



For the Year 
1904. 



Total. 



Soil and earth excavated from main cut-off trench (cubic 
yards), 

Soil and earth excavated from secondary cut-off trench 
(cubic yards.), 

Total length of main cut-off trench (feet) 

Length excavated to rock (feet) 

Length excavated into fine saud (feet), 

Length in which sheet piling was driven (feet), . 

Length in which sheet piling was not driven (feet), . 

Surface of rock uncovered aud treated at bottom of main 
cut-off trench (square feet), 

Soil from reservoir deposited in cut-off trenches and in the 
dike (cubic yards) 

Earth and gravel taken from borrow pits and deposited in 
the dike (cubic yards), 

Earth excavation for the construction of a small dike (coffer- 
dam) in Coachlace Pond (cubic yards), . 

Drain pipe laid at toe of westerly portion of dike (linear 
feet), . • 

Screened gravel on the water slope of the dike as a founda- 
tion for riprap (cubic yards), 

Riprap on the water slope of the dike (cubic yards), . 



499,856 

42,033 
9,505 
3,130 
6,375 
5,239 
1,136 

77,250 

4,765,333 

198,837 

19,172 

7,083 

14,355 
81,359 



190,603 
6,939 



1,556 
41,771 



499,856 

42,033 
9,505 
3,130 
6,375 
5,239 
1,136 

77,250 

4,955,936 

205,776 

19,172 

7,083 

15,911 
123,130 



The dike covers an area of 135 acres and contains 5,300,753 
cubic yards of material brought from outside sources. In addition, 
561,061 cubic yards of earth were excavated from cut-off trenches 
and for a small dike, making a total of 5,861,814 cubic yards of 
earth moved in connection with the construction of the dike. The 
dike is 10,400 feet or nearly 2 miles long on the water side at full- 
reservoir level, 65 feet high at the deepest place up to this level, 
and 1,930 feet wide at the base at the maximum section. 

The depositing of screened gravel as a foundation for the riprap on 
the westerly portion of the dike was completed April 13, 1904. The 
soil filling, constituting the principal part of the dike, and consist- 
ing of a total of 4,955,936 cubic yards, was completed November 
12. The placing of riprap was completed November 18. 

The total cost of the dike is substantially $750,000, which may be 
subdivided by classes of work, as follows : — 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 71 

Soil excavated from the reservoir and deposited at the North Dike, 
only the estimated cost of depositing it being charged to the dike, 

4,956,000 cubic yards, at 5 cents, $247,800 

Excavation from cut-off trench, 542,000 cubic yards, at 18 cents, . . 97,560 

Borrowed earth, 225,000 cubic yards, at 22 cents, 49,500 

Riprap and screened gravel, 139,000 cubic yards, at 64 cents, . . 88,960 

Drain pipe and other miscellaneous items, 11,180 

Sheet piling, treatment of ledge in bottom of cut-off trench, pumping, 

consolidating soil with water and other day-labor work, . . . 125,000 



$620,000 
Engineering and preliminary investigations, 130,000 



$750,000 



A day-labor force has been employed in finishing the slope of the 
dike toward the water on the easterly and westerly portions and 
seeding the slope of the easterly portion ; lumber and tools have 
been removed to the Wilson Street storage yard ; weeds have been 
mowed and burned ; and nine permanent benches have been placed 
on the easterly portion of the dike, for the purpose of determining 
future settlement of the material composing the dike. 

The maximum day-labor force employed at the dike was 10 men 
and 4 horses, for the week ending June 25. 

Measurements have been made during the past three years which 
give interesting and important information, confirming that pre- 
viously obtained with regard to the impermeability of the soil which 
has been used for the construction of the greater portion of the North 
Dike. 

A small well was sunk on the down-stream slope of the dike, 
about 1,200 feet distant from the crest of the dike and about 500 feet 
from the toe. The surface of the dike at the well is about 25 feet 
above the high-water level of a pond at the toe of the dike, and this 
pond is drawn down during the summer from 4 to 6 feet below the 
high- water level. 

During the time of these observations the Wachusett Reservoir 
had not been filled against the up-stream face of the dike, so that 
the water on that face was somewhat lower than at the down-stream 
toe. Notwithstanding this fact, the water in the well stands from 
18 to 24 feet — averaging about 22 feet — higher than the water in 
the pond at the toe of the dike. 

The soil, although merely "dumped from cars in layers 7j feet in 



72 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

thickness, is so Dearly Impervious that the rainfall alone is able to 
maintain the ground water in this portion of the dike only a few feet 
below the surface of the down-stream slope. 

The elevation of the water in the well rises after each heavy rain, 
and also shows a seasonal change, being higher after the spring 
floods and lower after the summer and autumn droughts. The water 
when highest was 2 feet below the surface of the dike, and when 
low est 7 feet below. 

Not only were the observations made at the well, but on two 
oeeasions, November 9, 1903, and April 21, 1904, were also made 
at points 25 feet apart in each direction, covering an area 400 feet 
long in the direction of the slope and 250 feet at right angles 
thereto in the vicinity of the well. These observations showed that 
the ground water was from 3 to 7 feet below the surface of the dike 
(which has a slope of from 3 to 4 feet in 100) and approximately 
parallel with it. 

Relocation and Construction of Roads. 

Considerable progress has been made by the contractors on the 
construction of highways at West Boylston and Oakdale. 

Of the new highway which passes through Oakdale, that part 
between Pleasant Street and the village was opened for travel on 
June 15, and the remainder, to a point south of the Quinepoxet 
arches, on September 17. 

Considerable work has also been done on Newton Street, south 
of the arches, and on the new location of Holden Street, which is 
now used for public travel. The highway across the reservoir at 
West Boylston was opened for public travel on December 24. The 
opening of these higtnva} r s has permitted the discontinuance of the 
last of the public railroad crossings at grade in the villages of Oak- 
dale and West Boylston. 

Additional information with regard to the work on the highways 
mentioned may be found subsequently in this report, under the 
head of Contracts. 

In addition to the work done by the contractors, there has been 
done by the day-labor forces a considerable amount of work, such as 
grading and seeding highway slopes ; erecting and painting high- 
way railings between West Boylston and Oakdale ; constructing the 
false Avorks for the arch bridge at the West Boylston crossing of the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 73 

reservoir, and removing the same ; constructing pipe highway cul- 
verts at the South Meadow Road, Clinton, and near the West Boyl- 
ston railroad station ; and constructing concrete highway culverts 
under Holden Street and at Maiden Brook on Newton Street, 
Oakdale. 

The maximum force employed was 23 men and 6 horses, for the 
week ending October 29. 

Removal of Soil. 

Work upon the removal of soil from the reservoir has been in 
progress under the contractors, the Newell and Snowling Construc- 
tion Company, and Bruno, Salomone & Petitti. More detailed 
information in regard to each contract will be found under the head 
of Contracts. 

The total amount of soil removed and to be removed from the 
Wachusett Reservoir is at present estimated to be about 6,900,000 
cubic yards, from approximately 3,943 acres. Of this, the total 
amount removed from the reservoir in previous years was 5,645,064 
cubic yards, from 3,236 acres; in 1904, 1,115,341 cubic yards 
were removed from 621 acres, making a total from the beginning 
of the work to the end of 1904 of 6,760,405 cubic yards, or 98 
per cent, of the total as at present estimated, removed from 3,857 
acres. 

The above total includes 160,895 cubic yards of soil stripped un- 
der contracts Nos. 273 and 275 (Dam and Aqueduct Depaiimient), 
from 101.4 acres near South Clinton, and 7,500 cubic yards stripped 
from the vicinity of the Wachusett Dam. 

Of the soil removed to the end of 1904, 470,233 cubic yards were 
used for road embankments, 1,026,754 cubic yards for shallow flow- 
age areas, 131,781 cubic yards for railroad embankments, 4,955,936 
cubic yards for the North Dike, 160,895 cubic yards for the South 
Dike, 7,306 cubic yards have been placed in spoil banks and 7,500 
cubic yards have been used near the Wachusett Dam. During the 
year 8,835 cubic yards of earth have been deposited upon the deep 
muck, which has been covered to a depth of about 1 foot. This 
amount, added to 230,011 cubic yards used for the same purpose 
during previous years, gives a total of 238,846 cubic yards. 

The day-labor forces under the direction of the engineering force 
have performed the following work : — 



14 METROPOLITAN WATEK [Pub. Doc 

All oi' the bodies from the old Beaman Cemetery have been re- 
moved to a new burial Lot adjoining the West Boylston Cemetery. 
The new lot was graded and seeded, a gravel drive was constructed, 
and a substantial wall enclosing the lot was built. Excavation was 
carried to a depth of about 7 feet over the whole area of the old 
cemetery, and 65 bodies were removed. These were placed in 
boxes |.ro\ [ded for the purpose, and reinterred in the new lot. The 
monuments, head-stones and foot-stones were removed and erected 
in their proper places. The excavated material was removed to the 
shallow llowage embankment opposite the Clarendon Mills. The 
work of removing the bodies was commenced on May 10 and com- 
pleted on May 21. 

The final cleaning of the reservoir bottom on the area to be 
flooded was accomplished to elevation 375. The weeds and grass 
were removed, and, together with the roots, etc., were burned over 
an area of 1,200 acres. On a considerable portion, where there was 
a growth of bunch grass, the ground was harrowed over with spring- 
tooth harrows. The grass was afterwards raked and burned. This 
method was somewhat more costly than mowing and raking the 
grass, but the results were more satisfactory. 

Stumps and driftwood were removed from the channels of the 
Stillwater, Quinepoxet and Nashua rivers, between Oakdale and a 
point about 1 mile below West Boylston. This material was piled 
and burned. Perennials w r ere pulled or grubbed on the portions 
of the reservoir from which the soil has been removed ; the reser- 
voir margin has been widened in the vicinity of Dover Pond, and 
also near West Boylston ; driftwood has been removed from the 
reservoir, and burned; soil on the old Central Massachusetts Kail- 
road embankments at Oakdale has been cast to the foot of the 
slopes, and covered ; the bottom of the reservoir in the vicinity of 
the upper end has been graded, to secure proper drainage ; and 
much other miscellaneous work has been done. 

The maximum force employed was 62 men and 6 horses, for the 
week ending October 1. 

In addition to the engineering work connected with the esti- 
mates and inspection of the removal of soil, the organic matter in 
1,035 samples of soil has been determined for the guidance of the 
inspectors. 





WACHUSETT RESERVOIR — West Boylston Manufacturing Company Mills Site 

before Beginning of Work and after Stripping of Reservoir 

and Construction of Arch and Embankment. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 75 

Relocation of Railroads. 

The principal part of the contract work upon the relocation of 
railroads was completed in 1903. Some paving has been done on 
the slopes of the Worcester, Nashua & Portland Division during 
the season of 1904, and a very small amount yet remains to be done 
in the vicinity of the Stillwater and Quinepoxet arches. The Bos- 
ton & Maine Railroad has raised and ballasted the track on the 
Worcester, Nashua & Portland Division south of the Oakdale sta- 
tion, and has also raised and ballasted the Y track connecting the 
Worcester, Nashua & Portland and Central Massachusetts divisions. 

The principal day-labor work in connection with the railroads 
has been the grouting of the masonry of the arches which carry the 
railroad over the Quinepoxet and Stillwater rivers, and the relaying 
of a considerable part of the wingwalls. This work became neces- 
sary because the wingwalls and portions of the abutments were 
originally laid without mortar, and, with the raising of the water in 
the reservoir against them, they might otherwise have failed. The 
waterway of the Quinepoxet arch was paved in 1902, and that of 
the Stillwater arch in 1903. The work of grouting the masonry 
and relaying the wingwalls was commenced at the Stillwater arch 
on June 6, 1904. A steam derrick was used to handle the materials 
of construction. The upper and insecure parts of the wingwalls 
were taken down, and when rebuilt the walls were extended to cor- 
respond with the slopes of the embankments. In rebuilding as 
much additional stone as was necessary was provided and all of the 
stone was laid in Portland cement mortar. It was necessary to take 
down and relay a large part of one of the wingwalls at the Stillwater 
arch. The grouting of the main parts of the walls proceeded at the 
same time. All joints were thoroughly washed out with a stream of 
water furnished by a steam pump through a 1-inch hose. The joints 
were then carefully filled at the face of the walls with rich mortar, 
holes being left about 5 feet apart for convenience in grouting. 
The filling of the joints was done a few days in advance of the 
grouting. A specially constructed funnel, having a spout on the 
side, was used in pouring the grout into the walls. The grout was 
prepared in an ordinary mortar box, and was composed of 3 parts of 
fine sand to 1 part of American Portland cement. Five or six men 
did the mixing with mortar hoes, and when the grout was of proper 



76 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

consistency, three men continued stirring the mixture while the 
Others poured the grout into the walls. Ordinary coal hods were 
used in transferring the grout to the wall, the hods being filled by 
means of coal scoops. Substantial stagings were erected as the work 
progressed, and the mixing box was always kept on a level with the 
work and close to the wall where the urout was beinir used. The 
grout ran very freely, in some cases showing in the walls at a dis- 
tance of 7") feet from the point of application. Four hundred and 
eighty cubic yards of rubble masonry were laid, at a cost of $4.86 
per cubic yard. This includes the expense of removing the old 
masonry and excavating for foundations at the ends of the walls. 
( )ne thousand seven hundred and thirty barrels of cement were used 
in the grouting, at a cost of $3 per barrel of cement. A total of 
2,041 barrels of cement were used for the rubble niasonr}^ and grout- 
ing of both arches. This work was completed November 19, the 
Quinepoxet arch being finished at that time. The maximum force 
employed was 26 men and 5 horses. 

The maximum day-labor force employed on the relocation of rail- 
roads was 28 men and 4 horses, for the weeks ending October 8 
and 29. 

Contracts, Wachusett Reservoir. 

Contract 210, jtfewell & Snowling Construction Company. 

Excavating Soil from Section 8 of the Wachusett Reservoir, and building a Part 
of the Westerly Portion of the North Dike, in Clinton and Sterling. 

On August 1, 1901, a contract was made with the Newell & 
Snowling Construction Company for removing soil from Section 8 
to the westerly portion of the North Dike. This contract called for 
the removal of a sufficient amount of soil to complete this portion of 
the dike, and also for the excavation of earth and gravel for the 
completion of the embankment along the water slope of the dike, 
and for the covering with sand or gravel of deep muck which it was 
not considered desirable to remove. A subsequent agreement was 
made with the contractors on May 13, 1903, for the placing of a 
layer of screened gravel from 6 to 18 inches in depth on the slope 
of the westerly portion of the dike, as a foundation for riprap. 

The operations of the contractor were continued along the same 
lines as during the preceding seasons. Soil has been loaded into 
carts and deposited in a shallow flowage embankment nearly oppo- 
site the former location of Sawyer's Mills. The remainder of the 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



77 



soil has been loaded into carts and, by means of dumping platforms 
into cars, or has been loaded directly into cars, and hauled by loco- 
motives to the North Dike. A limited area of muck has been cov- 
ered with earth to a depth of about 1 foot. The placing of screened 
gravel on the slope of the westerly portion of the dike was in 
progress at the close of 1903, and was completed April 13, 1904. 
The last soil was hauled to the dike November 1. 

By the operation of the railway and car plant, 57,427 carloads, 
containing 188,772 cubic yards, were transported to the dike; this, 
added to the 180,513 carloads, containing 620,131 cubic yards, 
transported during previous years, makes a total of 237,940 car- 
loads, containing 808,903 cubic yards, transported under this 
contract. 

The plant consisted of 2 12-ton locomotives, 60 3-cubic-yard 
dump cars and 5 miles of 3-foot-gage track. 

The total amount of work done has been : — ? 



. 


To December 
31, 1903. 


In 1904. 


Total. 


Earth excavation for embankment at dike (cubic yards), . 
Earth excavation for covering (cubic yards) , 
Gravel excavation for water slope of dike (cubic yards), . 
Screened gravel for foundation for riprap (cubic yards), . 


298 

696,245 

14,915 

55,245 

29,037 

6,776 


107 

274,503 

2,163 

4,479 

4,776 
1,556 


405 

970,748 

17,078 

59,724 

33,813 

8,332 



The amount of the final estimate was $395,092.50. 
The work was completed November 26. 

The maximum force employed was 184 men and 38 horses, for 
the week ending May 21. 

Contract 257, Bruno, Salomone & Petitti. 
Section 10 of the Wachusett Reservoir, in Boylston and West Boylston. 
On December 27, 1902, a contract was made with Bruno, Salo- 
mone & Petitti for the construction of what is known as Section 10 
of the Wachusett Reservoir. This" contract calls for clearing, 
grubbing and excavating soil from some 700 acres toward the upper 
end of the reservoir. At the beginning of 1904 it included all of 
the soil stripping necessary to complete the reservoir, excepting 



7- METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub; Doc. 

that covered by contracts of the Newell & Snowling Construction 
Company, John F. Magee & Co., and a comparatively small area 
along the Stillwater River at the upper end of (he reservoir which 
has not yet been placed under contract. It also provided for the 
construction of a new channel, chiefly in rock, for the Nashua River 
at the highway crossing oi' the reservoir at West Boylston : enlarg- 
ing a portion of the channel of the Quinepoxet River west of the 
Worcester, Nashua cSc Portland Division at Oakdale; building a 
concrete dam across the river at the upper end of this channel; 
paving the slopes of the railroad and highway embankments; exca- 
vating gravel to be used for protecting the slopes of embankments; 
and covering with earth deep deposits of muck not desirable to 
remove. The progress of the work was considerably in excess of 
the requirements ot the contract at the beginning of 1904. 

The methods employed by the contractors have been the same as 
in use during the preceding season. The soil from limited areas in 
the vicinity of shallow Ho wage and highway embankments has been 
loaded into carts and hauled directly to the embankments. A 
limited amount of soil has been placed in spoil banks. On other 
portions of the work, requiring a longer haul, the soil has been 
loaded into carts and, by means of dumping platforms into cars, or 
has been loaded directly into cars, and hauled to the embankments 
at West Boylston or Oakdale, or to the shallow ilowage embank- 
ments at Oakdale. 

The total number of carloads of soil hauled during the year has 
been 182,889, containing 580,254 cubic yards; this, added to 138,- 
543 carloads, containing 429,617 cubic } r ards, hauled during 1903, 
makes a total of 321,432 carloads, containing 1,009,871 cubic 
yards. 

Of the soil removed under this contract, 268,378 cubic yards 
were used in highway embankments, 917,524 cubic yards were 
used in shallow flowage embankments near Oakdale and 7,306 cubic 
yards were deposited in spoil banks. 

The railroad plant consisted of 6 12-ton locomotives, 1 10-ton 
locomotive, 80 2^-cubic-yard dump cars, 40 3-cubic-yard dump cars, 
40 3^-cubic-yard dump cars and 8.4 miles of 3-foot-gage track. 

The work of soil removal has been prosecuted vigorously during 
the season. Considerable earth excavation has been done in the 
new channel for the river above the Quinepoxet arches at Oakdale, 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



79 



and the slopes have been paved. The highway embankments at 
Oakdale and West Boylston have been completed. The slope pav- 
ing is completed on the highway embankments at Oakdale, and, 
with the exception of a small amount, is completed on the Worcester 
Street embankment at West Boylston. The excavation of the rock 
channel at West Boylston was completed and the water of the 
Nashua River turned through the channel on July 16. 

The total amount of work done under this contract has been : — 



To December 
31, 1903. 



For the Year 
1904. 



Total to 

December 31, 

1904. 



Clearing and grubbing (acres), 
Soil excavation (cubic yards), 
Earth excavation (cubic yards), 
Rock excavation (cubic yards), 
Slope paving (cubic yards), 



67 

496,261 

38,463 

4,917 

8,362 



87 

696,947 

52,386 

12,026 

10,630 



154 

1,193,208 
90,849 
16,943 
18,992 



This contract provided for the completion of the work on or 
before November 1, 1905 ; but in view of the importance of having 
the reservoir in readiness for the storage of large quantities of water 
in the spring of 1905, a bonus was offered for the completion at 
the end of 1904 of those portions of the work more than 15 feet 
below the full-reservoir level. This bonus has been earned by the 
contractors, notwithstanding that the number of cubic yards of soil 
removed was considerably in excess of the number in the prelim- 
inary estimate of quantities of work to be done. 

The maximum force employed has been 556 men and 107 horses, 
for the week ending September 10. 

Contract 268, Mc Arthur Brothers Company. 
Placing Riprap on the Westerly Portion of the North Dike, in Clinton and Sterling. 
On May 16, 1903, a contract was made with the Mc Arthur Brothers 
Company for using as riprap, on the westerly portion of the North 
Dike, granite to be excavated from the waste channel of the Wachu- 
sett Dam and in preparing the foundations for the dam, and a 
comparatively small amount of granite already excavated. The 
cross-section of the riprap and the methods of the contractor were 
for the greater part of the season the same as those described in 
the last annual report. About October 1 the work had advanced 



80 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

to the westerly end of the dike, and the derriok which had been used 
in plaoing the riprap \\a- then removed. A considerable quantity 
of coarse riprap wa> then required at different places along the dike, 
where it had been omitted on account of the difficulty in procuring 
a sufficient proportion of the Large stone from the excavations at the 
dam as tin- work on the dike progressed. After the removal of the 
derrick the cars were dumped and the stone placed entirely by labor- 
ers. The work was completed and the contractor's plant removed 
November is. Tin 1 total amount of riprap placed was 2;"), 008 cubic 
yards; this quantity, added to the 15,751 cubic yards previously 
placed, makes a total of 40,814 cubic yards. These quantities rep- 
resent the amount of solid rock used for the riprap, which, when in 
place as riprap, swelled to a volume two-thirds greater. 

The amount of the final estimate was $51,017.50. 

The maximum force employed was 16 men, for the week ending 
February 27. 

Contract 277, F. A. McOauliff. 

Masonry Arch Bridge at West Boylston. 

On June 23, 1904, a contract Avas made with F. A. McCaulifi'for 
the construction of a masonry arch bridge at the highway crossing 
the reservoir at "West Boylston. This contract called for the con- 
struction of a granite masonry arch highway bridge and wingwalls 
backed with concrete. The arch was to span a deep rock cut which 
had been excavated for the purpose of making a new channel for the 
Xashua River. The Board was to furnish the material for and erect 
and remove the false works on which the arch was to be built, and 
to prepare the foundations for the arch and wingwalls. Work was 
commenced on July 18 and completed in a satisfactory manner on 
September 28, two days ahead of the time required by the contract. 

The principal quantities of work performed were as follows : — 

Concrete masonry (cubic yards), . - 724 

Ashlar masonry (cubic yards), 498 

Face dressing of fine-pointed work (square feet), 1,096 

Face dressing of rough-pointed work (square feet), 400 

The value of the work, as shown by the final estimate, was 
$12,809.65. 

The maximum force employed was 38 men and 8 horses, for the 
week ending September 24. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 81 

Improving Wachusett Watershed. 
The dam at the Palmer mill-pond in Sterling was removed, and a 
main ditch 1,550 feet long and 4 feet wide on the bottom was dug 
to make a new channel for the brook running through it. Side 
ditches having an aggregate length of 1,365 feet were also dug for 
draining the site of the pond. Considerable other work has also 
been done by day-labor forces in constructing cesspools, privies and 

filter-beds. 

Forestry. 

The cutting out, grading, draining and improving of interior 
roads has been continued. About 3 miles of these roads have been 
treated in this manner, for purposes of fire protection and forestry 
improvement. The work of cutting out mature, dead and undesir- 
able trees, preparatory to planting, has been done over about 200 
acres. About 200 acres have been planted with three and four year 
old white pine seedlings grown in the nurseries of the Board. This 
area consisted of arable land, open and brushy pasture and sprout 
land which had been burned over, or on which there was little but an 
undesirable scrub growth. 

On the open areas pines were set at 10-foot intervals, with sugar 
maples between as fillers. These maples were natural seedlings 
obtained at the Lamson farm. Hickory nuts and acorns were planted 
to provide fillers on the brushy areas. On some partly forested areas 
pines only were planted, varying the intervals from 5 to 10 or more 
feet, according to the existing growth. Three rows of white pines 6 
feet apart each way were planted along 2 miles of the southern res- 
ervoir margin near Pine Hill; 123,900 pines, 89,700 sugar maples, 
7-| bushels of hickory nuts and 4 bushels of acorns were planted. 

The necessary care has been given to the Elagg and Lamson 
nurseries during the year. There were transplanted from seed beds 
to nursery rows at the Flagg nursery 23,000 two-year-old white 
pines. This nursery now contains 123,500 three and four year 
old white pines and 24,000 two-year-old pines in nursery rows. 
The seed beds contain approximately 23,000 white pines, 14,000 
Norway spruces and 300,000 arbor vitie, all tAvo years old. They 
also contain, from seed sown in May, 1904, 105,000 white pines, 
11,000 Douglas spruces, 3,000 hemlocks, 38,000 white spruces, 
4,000 tamaracks, 1,000 European larches and 10,000 Scotch pines. 



82 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The Lamson nursery contains about 12,000 three, four and five year 
old white pines. There have been taken up and heeled in for spring 
planting 19,000 pines and 22,000 natural seedling sugar maples. 

Furrows for lire protection have been plowed around all the areas 
planted this year, and replowed around areas previously planted 
and on lire guards where necessary. 

Pine trees from the nursery, together with larger ones taken from 
pasture land, were planted to form a screen around the filter-beds at 
the Worcester County Truant School. 

Engineering. 

In addition to the engineering work already enumerated, and 
that necessarily connected with the contract and day-labor work in 
progress, the engineering force of the Reservoir Department has 
performed the following work : — 

Plans, specifications and estimates have been prepared for the 
construction of a new highway on the southerly side of the reservoir 
between Oakdale and West Boylston ; elevations on the reservoir 
bottom, as determined by the final levels taken after the completion 
of soil excavation, have been entered on record sheets and contour 
lines have been drawn covering an area of about 430 acres, making 
a total of 2,500 acres covered by these final records at the end of 
the year. Curves were plotted and tables prepared showing the 
capacity of the reservoir at each tenth of a foot between elevations 
305 and 332. Surveys and plans were made of the Warfield estate 
in Holden and West Boylston, and of the Dorr property in Holden. 
Plans have been made for the discontinuance of parts of Newton 
and Pleasant streets at West Boylston, and for the discontinuance 
of Holden Street at Oakdale. Plans have been revised for the relo- 
cation of Holden and Xewton streets at Oakdale. In addition to 
the surveys and plans mentioned, many others have been made in 
connection with the settlement of claims and for other purposes, 
and much miscellaneous en£ineerin£ work has been done. • 

DAM AND AQUEDUCT DEPARTMENT. 

(The statement of the work of this depaitment has been prepared by Thomas F. Richardson, Depart- 
ment Engineer.) 

The principal work of this department has been the construction 
of the Wachusett Dam and of the superstructure of the lower gate- 
chamber of the dam, the construction of the South Dike and the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 83 

removal of soil from the Waehusett Reservoir near South Clinton. 
The department has also had charge of the operation of the Waehu- 
sett Aqueduct and the Clinton sewage-disposal system. 

The organization of the force has continued practically the same 
as during the previous year. Chester W. Smith, division engineer, 
continued in charge of the work at the Waehusett Dam until De- 
cember 10, when he resigned to accept a position in charge ot the 
Roosevelt Dam, near Phoenix, Ariz., for the Reclamation Service 
of the United States Geological Survey. Mr. Smith, in addition 
to his duties as division engineer, acted as chief inspector at the 
dam during the progress of masonry construction. Moses J. Look, 
division engineer, has had charge of the construction of the South 
Dike and of the removal of soil near South Clinton. The work in 
the drafting office has been in charge of Allen E. Shannan. Elliot 
R. B. Allardice has continued in charge of the river and aqueduct 
gagings, and has direct supervision of the maintenance of the Clin- 
ton sewerage plant. He has also had charge of the construction of 
some extensions to the Clinton sewage disposal system, which have 
been built by day labor during the year. 

The engineering force has averaged 24 men for the whole year ; 
there were also 10 masonry inspectors. 

The main office of the department is* in Clinton, and a branch 
office has been maintained at the Waehusett Dam. 

Wachusett Dam. 

The design of the Wachusett Dam and the contract for its con- 
struction, which was made with the Me Arthur Brothers Company 
on October 1, 1900, were described in the annual report of January 
1, 1901. The plant provided for the work, and the methods of 
carrying on the work, both at the quarry and at the dam, were fully 
described in the annual report of January 1, 1902. There has been 
no material change in the plant or in the methods. 

The work was carried on without interruption from the beginning 
of the year until December 24, when practically all work was shut 
down for the winter. Work upon' the masonry, which was suspended 
on account of cold weather on December 8, 1903, was not resumed 
until March 24, and was again suspended on November 28. The 
progress on the work has been good, about 10,000 cubic yards more 
masonry having been laid during the past year than during any 



M METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

previous year. The work is considerably behind the requirements 
of the contract, which provides for the completion of (he whole 
work on November L5, 1904. The dam has, however, been carried 
to a sufficient height to permit the storage in the reservoir of as 

much water as it will be feasible to store next spring. Rather more 
than 15,000 oubic yards of masonry still remain to be built, out of 
a total of 273,000 cubic yards, — an amount of work which can 
easily be accomplished during the ooming season. 

Industrial conditions have been favorable during L904, and both 
common and skilled labor have been plentiful. Sufficient supplies 
of all kinds have been readily obtainable. 

Main Dam, Gate-chambers <nid Terminal Structures, 

When work upon the masonry was suspended in 1903, the masonry 
extended across the valley for a length of 739 feet, and the top of 
the masonrv was at an average elevation of 345, or about 79 feet 
above the original river bed. Short masonry cut-off walls had been 
built at both ends of the masonry from the up-stream face of the 
dam to the ledge rock, to prevent water from going around the low 
ends. The lowest point in the masonry of the dam between the cut- 
oil" walls was at about elevation 341. The substructure of the lower 
irate-chamber had been built, and four 48-inch valves for control- 
ling the flow of the water into the river below the dam, and eight 
24-inch valves for controlling the flow of the water into the Wachu- 
sett Aqueduct, had been placed in this substructure. 

Excavation, — When masonry work was discontinued in December, 
1903, the excavation at the easterly end had been extended close up 
to the tracks over which stone is brought from the quarry, and these 
tracks were as near as possible to the cableway towers. As soon as 
the masonry work was suspended the tracks were removed, and later 
were carried across the dam on a timber trestle about 25 feet high, 
which rested on the masonry which had already been built. Prep- 
arations were also made to increase the span of both cableways from 
1,150 feet to 1 ,250 feet. New tracks for the head towers were built 
100 feet back of the previous tracks, and 21 feet higher. The head 
towers were then raised by means of screw jacks, and moved on 
building movers' rolls to these tracks, the cables and other ropes 
being taken off the towers while they were being moved. The re- 
moval of the first tower was completed on February 4, and of the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 85 

other on February 27. The new tracks on which the cable ways 
move up and down the valley were reduced in length from 500 feet, 
as originally built, to 150 feet. 

As soon as the tracks over which stone is brought were removed, 
the work of excavation was resumed and was continued until July 
9, when the excavation for the dam at the easterly end was com- 
pleted. Some of the earth removed was used to fill the trench for 
the dam near the easterly end of the masonry, and the remainder 
was passed by derricks to the cable ways, and dumped both above 
and below the dam on the westerly side of the valley. Considerable 
of the earth from between the cableway towers was placed back of 
the towers to form the road-bed for the new cableway tracks. In 
filling above the dam on the easterly side of the river, special pre- 
cautions were adopted during cold weather to ensure a water-tight 
filling. Arrangements were made so that the earth filling would be 
puddled by dumping into water, this water being heated by the 
steam from two boilers, so as to remove any frost that there might 
be in the earth. The rock removed was placed outside of the earth, 
both above and below the dam, at the easterly end, and was used for 
grading the grounds below the dam. 

The earth overlying the rock had a depth of about 35 feet, and 
was a boulder clay so hard and compact that it was found economical 
to loosen it by blasting. The rock uncovered was a soft black or 
gray schist, and the average depth of the excavation in the rock 
under the whole base of the dam was about 9 feet. In addition, 
a cut-off trench 20 feet wide was excavated to a depth of about 
15 feet in the black schist, which was practically impervious to 
water. This cut-off trench extended a short distance under the 
abutment. 

At the westerly end of the dam the excavation of earth and rock 
was substantially finished in 1903, except the westerly 40 feet of the 
cut-off trench in the rock. This trench, which is 20 feet wide under 
the main dam, was narrowed somewhat as it passed through the site 
of the bastion, and has a width of 17 feet at the junction with the 
waste-weir. The rock under the bastion was a hard granite, which 
was less seamy than the rock toward the lower part of the valley. 
It was consequently necessary to excavate this part of the cut-off 
trench only to a depth of 10 feet to reach rock practically free from 
seams, and the work was finished in May. 



86 METROPOLITAN WATKK [Pub. Doc. 

In excavating the cut-oil' trench on both Bides of the valley, the 
method adopted in previous years, and described in the annual re- 
port of January 1. 1902, of drilling 3-inch holes 6 inches apart on 

both aides of the trench, was followed. 

Masonry, — As previously stated, masonry construction was in 
progress from March 21 to November 28. When masonry work was 
suspended, the main dam had an average elevation of 396, equiva- 
lent to 1 foot above full-reservoir level, 130 feet above the original 
river bed and 188 feet above the lowest point of the foundation not 
in the cut-off trench. A gap about 20 feet wide, through which 
pass two tracks over which stone is brought from the quarry, has 
been left through the masonry, the bottom of this gap being at 
about elevation 369. If necessary, this gap can readily be built up 
with masonry in the early spring, so that water can be stored to 
elevation 380. A few of the coping stones of the dam have been 
set at the easterlj 7 end, near the abutment. The total length of the 
dam is 1,476 feet, made up of waste-weir, 452 feet; main dam, in- 
cluding the terminal structures, 1)7 1 feet; and corewall, which ex- 
tends beyond the terminal structure at the easterly end, 53 feet. 
The length of the dam between terminal structures is 838 feet. The 
rubble-stone masonry down stream from the centre line of the dam 
was laid as before, with beds inclined upward 1 in lj toward the 
down-stream face, until the masonry reached elevation 370. Above 
this elevation all of this class of masonry has been laid with practi- 
cally horizontal beds. 

A large part of the terminal structure at the easterly end of the 
dam, which is known as the abutment, has been built, some of the 
string course stone at elevation 415 having been set. The section 
of the rubble masonry corewall which was built in 1903 has been 
extended so as to connect with the abutment. The 6 concrete piers 
for supporting the floor of the abutment have been partially built. 
About 137 feet of the retaining wall, extending 200 feet up stream 
from the abutment, have been completed. 

The top of the masonry at the upper gate-chamber is at elevation 
396. Six ports or openings have been constructed to each of the 
4 wells in the upper gate-chamber. These ports are between eleva- 
tions 330 and 390, and will admit water to the 48-inch pipes through 
the dam. Eight sluice gates, each 6 feet high and 2.5 feet wide, 
which will reirulate the flow of water through the dam, have been 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 87 

placed in the wells in the upper gate-chamber, and the gate stands 
for operating these gates have been set in a temporary manner. 

The masonry of the terminal structure at the westerly end of the 
main dam, which is known as the bastion, has been built to eleva- 
tion 404. 

Waste Channel and Waste-weir. 

Work has been in progress excavating rock from the waste 
channel for nearly the whole year, most of the rock excavated being 
hauled to the westerly portion of the North Dike, a distance of 
about 2 miles, to be used as riprap. After November 17 the rock 
was used as filling below the bastion and as riprap above the dam. 
During the early part of the year the work done was in the upper 
part of the waste channel in front of the waste-weir, where a channel 
of varying width and depth, but averaging about 70 feet wide and 
6 feet deep, was excavated in the rock in order to furnish sufficient 
waterway to remove the water which may flow over the waste- weir. 
This channel is narrower and deeper where it passes under the loca- 
tion of the permanent line of the Central Massachusetts Railroad, 
the rock excavation being about 50 feet wide and 20 feet deep at 
this point. Most of the rock and all of the earth in the waste 
channel have been excavated, except that under the temporary loca- 
tion of the Central Massachusetts Railroad, which cannot be removed 
until the railroad is changed to its permanent location. 

The earth excavation was largely finished during 1903, but a 
small amount of earth has been excavated near the upper end, and 
used for filling below the bastion. The earth slopes of the waste 
channel below the railroad crossing have been trimmed, and on the 
southerly side have been covered with soil and seeded. Some soil 
has been delivered on the northerly side of the channel, but has 
not been placed on the slopes. 

The 24-inch cast-iron pipe which supplies the Lancaster Mills 
with water crosses the waste channel near its lower end, and the 
bottom of the pipe as originally laid was at the same level as the 
bottom of the waste channel. To ensure the safety of this pipe 
when water is running in the waste channel, it has been placed in a 
trench 5 feet deep, excavated in the rock which forms the bottom of 
the channel. In refilling this trench, the upper 18 inches was filled 
with Portland cement concrete. 

At the site of the waste-weir, the rock, most of which had been 



METROPOLITAN WATKK [Pub. Doc. 

uncovered the preceding year, was found to he freer from seams than 
in the lower part of the valley. This, together with the fact that 
for most <>t" the length of the waste-weir the flow line of the reservoir 
is 15 feel or less above the surface of the rock below the masonry, 
has made it necessary to excavate but very little rock to obtain a 
suitable foundation. For about 165 feet from the bastion a cut-oil 
trench K) feet wide and about 8 feet deep was excavated under the 
up-stream portion of the waste-weir. In excavating this trench, 
.•-inch holes 6 inches on centres were drilled on the down-stream 
side of the trench for most of the distance. The rock from the 
trench was then removed, largely by blasting, but care was taken to 
disturb as little as possible the lower side of the trench. Under the 
remaining 285 feet of the waste- weir the rock was prepared for the 
masonry by barring and wedging, rather more than 2 feet of rock 
on an average being removed, though in one place it was necessary 
to remove over 6 ieet of rotten rock before obtaining a suitable foun- 
dation. 

Masonry of Waste-weir and Retaining Wall, 

Work was begun on masonry at the waste-weir early in June, and 
about 390 linear feet have been completed, leaving 60 linear feet 
still to be built, but the part remaining to be built is only about 7 
feet high. No masonry work has been done on the small abutment 
at the westerly end of the waste-weir. 

Extending along the easterlv side of the waste channel from the bas- 
tion, to and beyond the arch bridge which will carry the tracks of the 
Central Massachusetts Kailroad across the waste channel, is a retain- 
ing wall which has a height of over 26 feet above the bottom of the 
channel near the bastion ; 195 linear feet of the higher part of this 
Avail have been finished. Immediately below the waste- weir and 
against the retaining wall the ledge rock was lower than the sur- 
rounding rock in the waste channel. This hole has been filled, 
partly with rubble masonry, covered with ashlar paving 2 feet thick, 
and partly with Portland cement concrete masonry. The paving is 
22;} feet below the full-reservoir level. 

Arch Bridge and Retaining Wall near Loicer End of Waste 

Channel. 
An arch bridge having a span of 35 feet 6 inches has been con- 
structed across the lower end of the waste channel, affording access 
to the grounds below the dam from Grove Street on the westerly 




HIGHWAY BRIDGE over the Waste Channel of the Wachusett Reservoir. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



89 



side of the pond below the dam. The arch of this bridge is built of 
Portland cement concrete masonry, faced at the ends with stone. 
The stone parapet walls and face walls are curved in plan, the radius 
of the curve midway between the parapet walls being about 275 feet. 
The total length of the parapet walls, the tops of which are 3 feet 2 
inches above the finished roadway, is about 131 feet, and the road- 
way is 20 feet wide. 

Arch Bridge for the Central Massachusetts Railroad. 
This bridge, which will have a span of nearly 58 feet, while not 
included in the original contract for the dam, is to be built by the 
contractor for the dam under a supplementary agreement. It crosses 
the waste channel at a considerable angle about 225 feet below the 
waste-weir. The arch will be built of Portland cement concrete 
faced at the ends with rubble masonry. Some work has been done 
preparing foundations, but no masonry has been built. 

Amount of Work done and of Materials used. 

The following table gives the amount of work done to the end of 
1901, the amount of work done during 1902, 1903 and 1904, the 
total amount of work done to the end of 1904 and the total esti- 
mated amount required by the contract : — 





To 


In 

1902. 


In 

1903. 


In 
1904. 


Total to 


Total 




December 
31, 1901, 


December 
31, 1904. 


Estimated 
Amount. 


Earth excavation (cubic yards), . 


43,000 


31,900 


68,800 


59,900 


203,600 


222,000 


Rock excavation (cubic yards), . 


24,370 


12,020 


18,800 


36,810 


92,000 


95,000 


Rubble atone masonry (cubic yards), 


28,486 


65,686 


69,139 


76,598 


239,909 


252,000 


Ashlar masonry (cubic yards), . 


65 


684 


2,015 


4,905 


7,669 


8,850 


Dimension stone masonry (cubic yards), . 


- 


58 


417 


830 


1,305 


2,850 


Brick masonry (cubic yards), 


- 


407 


231 


398 


1,036 


1,150 


Concrete masonry (cubic yards), 


- 


5,284 


1,906 


914 


8,104 


9,350 


Iron and other metal work (tons), 


"• 


582 


71 


46 


699 


900 



The number of barrels of cement used in the work at the dam has 
been as follows : — 





To 

December 

31, 1901. 


In 1902. 


In 1903. 


In 1904. 


Total to 

December 

31, 1904. 




17,703 

8,892 


21,865 
52,896 


18,719 
51,533 


16,561 
61,739 


74,848 
175,060 




26,595 


74,761 


70,252 


78,300 


249,908 



90 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pul). Doc. 



Of the oement used during 1904, all of the natural cement has 
been of the Union brand, and L2,42] barrels of the Portland cement 
have been of the Giant brand, both cements being manufactured by 
the American Cement Company of Egypt, Pa.; 1,110 barrels of 
Lehigh Portland oement have also been used. 

The amount of cement used In the dam per cubic yard of each 
class of rubble masonry from the beginning of the work has been as 
follows : — 



Composition of Moutar by Measure. 


Barrels of 
Cement per 
Cubic Yard. 


Cubic Yards 
built. 




1.48 

0.99 
1.06 
0.86 
0.79 


184 

172,251 

31,970- 

8,926 

2.1,517 



The amount of cement used in the dam per cubic yard of each 
class of concrete masonry has been as follows : — 



Composition or Concrete by Measure. 



Barrels of 
Cement per 
Cubic Yard. 




Cubic Yards 
built. 



1 part natural cement, 2 parts sand and 5 parts stone, . 
1 part natural cement, 3 parts sand and 6 parts stone, . 
1 part Portland cement, 2| parts sand and 4$ parts stone, 
1 part Portland cement, 3 parts sand and 6 parts stone, . 
1 part Portland cement, 4 parts saud and 8 parts stone, . 



995 

18 

5,832 

1,087 

172 



Miscellaneous Notes. 
All masonry built before April 12 and toward the latter part of 
the season — masonry likely to be exposed to the action of the frost 
— was laid in Portland cement mortar, mixed in the proportion of 3 
parts of sand to 1 part of cement. After November 3 all masonry 
was so laid. The water used for mixing mortar was heated after 
October 27. Between April 12 and November 3 most of the ma- 
sonry was laid in natural cement mortar mixed in the proportion of 
2 parts of sand to 1 part of cement ; but Portland cement mortar 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 91 

mixed in the same proportions as the natural cement mortar was 
used, as in previous years, for the masonry in the cut-off trench, 
for masonry immediately above the ledge rock and in the upper 
gate-chamber. 

The largest amount of rubble masonry laid in the dam during any 
week was during the week ending June 25, when 11 derricks were 
in operation, and 3,459 cubic yards were laid. During that week 
about 42 cubic yards of ashlar masonry were also laid. The average 
amount of rubble masonry laid per day by each mason has been 13 
cubic yards, and by each derrick 56.1 cubic yards. This very large 
accomplishment has been possible because of the very complete 
appliances for furnishing materials to the work. 

The building of concrete masonry has been entirely in the day- 
time, and the concrete has been mixed by hand. 

A large amount of work has been done grading the grounds below 
the dam both in the bottom of the valley and. on the hillsides. In 
connection with the construction of the Wachusett Aqueduct and 
Central Massachusetts Railroad tunnels large quantities of waste 
rock were dumped on the easterly hillside below the dam, and exca- 
vations have been made on the hillside for the dam and for the 
tracks on which the stone was brought to the dam. These tunnel 
dumps have been to a large extent removed and graded, the excava- 
tions for the tracks and for the dam have been filled, and a large 
part of the hillside has been covered with soil stripped from the 
reservoir. In the bottom of the valley the grounds around the 
'pool and the lower gate-chamber have been graded and nearly all 
covered with soil obtained from the bottom of the old mill-pond. 
Foundations for the drives and paths below the dam, consisting of 
about 18 inches in depth of stone from the tunnel dumps, have been 
placed, and the paths have been finished with a coating of fine 
screened stone from these dumps. 

The stone for the rubble masonry is still obtained from the quarry, 
about 11 miles from the dam. The stone for the ashlar and dimen- 
sion stone masonry has all been obtained from the quarry of H. E. 
Fletcher & Co., at "West Chelmsford, Mass. 

The maximum force employed by the contractor, including the 
men employed at the Chelmsford quarry, was during the week end- 
ing July 30, when 778 men and 54 horses were employed. At that 
time 141 men were employed at the Chelmsford quarry. 



92 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Contract 276) Connery <& Wentworth, 

Superstructure of the lower gate-chamber of the Wachusett Dam; dale of contract^ 
March JS, 1904 ; amount of contract, #72,937.34. 

This building covers the gates and other works used for control- 
ling the flow of water to the Wachusett Aqueduct and to the river 
below the dam, and in it may be installed machinery for generating 
power. It is 104 feet 6 inches long, 74 feet wide, outside dimen- 
sions, and the ridge of the roof is about 59 feet above the ground. 
A large part of the interior of the building is taken up by one large 
room, 74 feet 1 inch long by 64 feet wide, the ceiling of which is 
about 37 feet above the floor. In addition, there are 8 smaller rooms 
and a large storage room at the easterly end, which will be used 
for various purposes in connection with the operation of the works. 

The exterior walls are of fine pointed granite obtained from the 
quarry of H. E. Fletcher & Co. at West Chelmsford, Mass. : the 
interior is finished with red face brick, and the roof is covered with 
Conosera Spanish roof tiles. 

The contractor began to set up a derrick and build an office and 
storage sheds on May 2, the first stone was set on May 16 and the 
work on the contract was completed on December 22. The maxi- 
mum force employed, including the men employed at the Chelms- 
ford quarry, was during the week ending June 18, when 110 men 
and 7 horses were employed. Seventy-five of these men were 
employed at the quarry. 

The contract price for the superstructure was $72,937.34. 

The work under this contract has been performed in a con- 
scientious and workmanlike manner, and the exterior stonework has 
been particularly well executed. 

A Gurney heating plant has been installed, and the building wired 
for electric lights by employes of the Board. 

South Dike. 

Contract 275, John F. Magee & Co. 

Date of contract, December 26, 1903 ; amount of contract, $139,411.04. 

This contract called for soil stripping from about 87 acres of the 

site of the Wachusett Reservoir, and the construction of the South 

Dike, except the placing of the heavier riprap. Included in the 

work is the excavation of a cut-off trench, the refilling of this trench 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 93 

with compacted soil from the reservoir, the excavation of soil and 
earth from spoil banks and borrow pits, and the placing of soil and 
earth in the dike, also the placing of the two lighter grades of rip- 
rap. The South Dike was fully described in the last annual report. 
Work was begun under this contract on January 5, in excavating 
from the cut-off trench, and on January 7 an additional force was 
put at work excavating sand and gravel from a borrow pit and haul- 
ing same to what formerly was Carville's ice pond, where 2.7 acres 
of deep muck were covered to a depth of about 1 foot. Work was 
continued through the winter, in excavating from the cut-off trench 
and from borrow pits, the material being used for covering the 
muck and for making the fill of the dike. The winter was an unusu- 
ally severe one, the snowfall being considerable and the temperature 
lower than in most winters, making the work difficult. The con- 
tract for this work provided that on or before April 1, 1904, the 
contractor should substantially complete the whole cut-off trench, 
and should have 200 linear feet of the lowest portion of the trench 
in readiness for the treatment of the rock. The contractor did not 
succeed in finishing the 200 feet on the date specified, owing to 
the severe weather ; but the treatment of the rock in the higher 
part of the trench was commenced on March 31, and this work 
will be described further on. The amount ot material to be 
handled, and the limited time available for the work, made it 
necessary that over 45,000 cubic yards of material per month 
should be handled. This required the provision of a very consid- 
erable plant, which was as follows : — 

4 locomotives (2 12-ton, 2 16-ton), made by the Vulcan Iron Works, Wilkes- 

barre, Pa. 
1 steam shovel, dipper 2| yards capacity, made by John Souther & Co., Boston, 

Mass. 
80 cars for hauling soil, 3£ cubic yards capacity, made by the Ryan & McDonald 

Manufacturing Company, Baltimore, Md. 
40 cars for hauling gravel, 3 cubic yards capacity, made by the same company as 

the cars for the soil. 
4£ miles of track. 

The contractor also provided 40 cars of 11 cubic yards capacity, 
but these cars were not used. In addition, a large number of teams 
were used. 



!•! 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[ Pub. Doc. 



The principal quantities of work done were as follows: — 



Grubbing (acres) 

Soil excavation (cubic yards), . 
Earth excavation (cubic yards), 
Earth excavation from borrow pus (cubic 
Rock excavation (cubic yards),. 
Riprap (cubic yards), 
Paving (cubic yards), 



yards), 



56 

1.07,786 

36,096 

224,075 

947 

7,687 

29 



The work on this contract was completed on December 8. The 
maximum force employed was 365 men and 94 horses, for the week 
ending June 1 8. 

Treatment of Rock in Cut-off Trench* 

As before stated, this work was begun on March 31, and was done 
largely by a day-labor force, though at times the contractor fur- 
nished a portion of the men. After the trench was excavated to 
rock by the contractor, all loose and broken rock was removed by 
means of bars and wedges. The surface of the rock w r as then care- 
fully cleaned with brooms, and washed off, by means of a hose, 
with water under a considerable pressure, a pipe line 3,180 feet 
long having been laid and connected w r ith the w T ater system of the 
town of Clinton, to furnish the water. All seams were carefully 
cleaned out and filled with rich Portland cement mortar, or, if large, 
with stone laid in mortar. Rubble masonry Avas built under all 
overhanging rock which could not be removed with bars and wedges. 
The entire surface treated was then covered with a thick Portland 
cement grout, composed of equal parts of cement and fine sand, 
which was applied by a broom, the surface of the rock being first 
wet. The total length of cut-off trench treated in this way was 
1,884 feet, and the area treated was 42,280 square feet. The bot- 
tom of the trench at the lowest point is 50 feet below full- reservoir 
level. The work was finished May 21. 

The maximum force employed was 68 men, for the week ending 
April 30. 

Clinton Sewerage Settling Basins. 

Eight settling basins have been added to the Clinton sewerage 
system. These basins are located immediately south of the filter- 
beds, alongside and east of the 24-inch vitrified pipe main which 
conducts sewage to the filter-beds. Each basin has a capacity of 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



95 



about 237,000 gallons, is about 320 feet long, and has a width at 
the water line of about 33 feet, the basins being separated from 
each other by longitudinal banks of soil, which have side slopes of 
1% horizontal to 1 vertical. When the basins are in operation the 
sewage will have an average depth of about 4 feet below the over- 
flow. The basins are built mostly above the original surface of the 
ground, the surface soil forming a bottom which allows but little 
water to pass through. Running under the longitudinal banks 
which separate the basins are 6-inch vitrified pipe underdrains, the 
bottoms of which are 2 feet below the bottoms of the basins. These 
underdrains are intended to intercept any water which may pass 
through the soil which forms the bottoms and sides of the basins, 
and convey it to some small filter-beds where it can be refiltered. 
These small filter-beds have an aggregate area of .83 acres, and the 
soil removed in preparing them, together with 6 inches of soil from 
the six beds of the existing system from which the soil was not 
removed when they were built, was used for constructing the banks 
which form the basins. Each basin has inlet and outlet structures 
built of Portland cement concrete, which contain gates for con- 
trolling the flow of sewage and for emptying the basins. The 
basins are so arranged that all or a part of the sewage can be passed 
through them, or all of it can be delivered as formerly directly to 
the filter-beds. 

The principal quantities of work done were as follows : — 



Earth excavation (cubic yards), . . . . 
Portland cement concrete 1 : 2k : 4£ (cubic yards), 
24-inch vitrified pipe laid (linear feet), 
18-inch vitrified pipe laid (linear feet), 
8-inch vitrified pipe laid (linear feet), 
6-inch vitrified pipe laid (linear feet), 



11,720 

148 

317 

319 

1,212 

2,308 



The cost of this work, which was done by a day-labor force be- 
tween September 1 and November 3, including engineering, was 
$7,242.13. The maximum force employed was 40 men and 16 
horses, for the week ending October 1. 



Relocation of Central Massachusetts Railroad. 

No contract work has been done on the relocation of the Central 
Massachusetts Railroad during the year. A day-labor force has 
graded the approaches to and built an overgrade timber bridge 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

aero-- the railroad at a form crossing on the Moran land near 
West Berlin. The ends of this bridge arc supported on masonry 

abutments, and the timber bents on masonry piers built of Port- 
land cement concrete. A day-labor force has also built two catch- 
basins, and laid 210 feet of 10-inch Akron pipe to provide drain- 
age for the roadway at the undergrade highway crossing near West 
Berlin. 

The maximum force employed was 34 men and 7 horses, during 
the week ending June 25. 

Roads and Bridges. 
When Boylston Street was constructed in a new location, in 1898, 
a temporary bridge was built over a portion of the Central Massachu- 
setts Railroad, which has since been discontinued. This bridge was 
removed and a permanent embankment has been built in its place. 
About o,100 cubic yards of earth were handled in making the em- 
bankment. A culvert, consisting ot 120 linear feet of 24-inch cast- 
iron pipe, was built at' this place. 

Mortar Experiments. 

Mention was made in the last annual report of experiments made 
to determine the effect of the addition of salt to mortar where not 
subjected to freezing, the salt being added in the proportion of 4 
and 8 pounds per barrel of cement. In this series of experiments 
360 briquettes were made, but only part of them had been broken 
at the time of the last report. All of these briquettes have now been 
broken, and the results obtained indicate that mortar to which salt 
has been added in the proportions mentioned is about 20 per cent. 
stronger than when salt has not been used. 

Cement Tests. 
The usual tables of tests of cements used in the dam and other 
works at the Wachusett Reservoir and in the Weston Aqueduct may 
be found in Appendix No. 2. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 97 



WESTON AQUEDUCT DEPARTMENT. 

(Horace Ropee, Department Engineer to May 25, when the department was abolished, and the work 
remaining to be done was placed in charge of Dexter Brackett, Engineer of the Sudbury and Dis- 
tribution Departments.) 

At the end of the year 1903 the Weston Aqueduct and Reservoir 
were so nearly finished that they had been placed in service. The 
only contract work remaining to be done was at the Weston Reser- 
voir, where the work was chiefly the spreading of loam over the 
surfaces of embankments and the completion of the screen-chamber. 
Along a large part of the aqueduct and around the reservoir there 
remained the final grading and seeding of embankments, the build- 
ing of fences and the setting of stone bounds. All of this work 
has been completed during the year. 

The engineering force engaged upon the work numbered 36 at 
the beginning of the year and 1 at the end of the year. In the 
early part of the year the force Avas employed in the preparation of 
final estimates of the work done under contracts and upon record 
plans. The principal engineers completed their work as follows : 
Marshall Nevers, division engineer, April 2 ; Dan B. Clark, divi- 
sion engineer, April 16 ; George W. Booth, division engineer, 
August 9 ; Walter W. Patch, assistant engineer in charge of records, 
drafting and computing at the Saxonville office, June 30. George 
A. Winsor, assistant engineer, has continued on the work through- 
out the year. 

The branch office at Way land was discontinued on February 29, 
the Saxonville office on June 30, and the Weston office on July 16. 

Contracts. 
Nawn & Brock, contractors for Section 14 of the Weston Aque- 
duct (open channel) and sections 1 and 2 of the Weston Reservoir, 
resumed the work of grading the embankments near the channel 
and reservoir on April 9, and completed all the work under their 
contracts on May 20. It was not feasible, on account of the cold 
Weather in December, 1903, to remove the earth from the surfaces 
of the rock in the reservoir as thoroughly as was desired, and early 
in April the water in the reservoir was drawn down about 9 feet, 
and all rock surfaces to a depth of not less than 6 feet below the 
full-reservoir level were thoroughly cleaned. 






METROPOLITAN WATEB 



[Pub. Doc. 



The prinoipal quantities of work performed under these contracts 
w ere as follows : — 



Clearing and grabbing (acres), , 
Earth excavation (cubic yards), . 
Rock excavation (cubic yards), .... 

Riprap (cubic yards), 

Slope paving (cubic yards), .... 
Portland cement concrete masonry (cubic yards), 
Ashlar masonry (cubic yards), .... 
Dimension stone masonry (cubic yards), . 



37 

<! 29,890 

8,252 

8,235 

1,171 

3,537 

46 

3!) 



n by the final esti- 



The total value of the work done, as show 
mates, was sl> 17,li»S.07. 

The Woodbury & Leighton Company, contractors for the channel 
and screen-chambers, resumed work on the screen-chamber, and 
completed it on April 8. The amount of their contract was 
$12,484.75. 

Additional Work on Aqueduct and Reservoir. 

Early in the spring the work of building fences, setting stone 
bounds, grading and seeding the aqueduct embankments and the 
grounds around the reservoir was resumed, and continued until the 
latter part of October, when the work was finished. This work 
was done by day- labor forces, under the direction of Mr. Winsor 
and the superintendents of the Sudbury and Distribution Depart- 
ments. It included the building of 86,543 feet of fences, the grad- 
ing and seeding of 86 acres of land, the setting of about 600 stone 
bounds, the surfacing of a driveway 1,600 feet long from Xewton 
Street to the screen-chamber at the Weston Reservoir, the excava- 
tion of 2,100 linear feet of drainage ditches, the laying of 230 feet 
of 10-inch Akron pipe at the reservoir, and the construction of a 
paved channel 735 feet long near the westerly portal of tunnel No. 
2, for the' purpose of preventing the washing of the slopes by surface 
water. 

Gages for indicating the elevation of the water have been placed 
in the channel and screen-chambers at the Weston Reservoir, and in 
the terminal chamber of the aqueduct. Recording gages, one show- 
ing the elevation of the water in the aqueduct and one the depth of 
water on the measuring weir, have been placed in the head chamber 
near the Sudbury Dam. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



99 



Large gates provided with hoisting apparatus have been set in the 
siphon chambers, and stop-planks have been made for use at other 
chambers. 

Quantity and Cost of Work done in constructing Aqueduct, 
Reservoir and Supply Pipe Line. 

The following tables show the quantities and the cost of the work 
done in the construction of the aqueduct, reservoir and supply pipe 
line. It is a summary of the contract work, made from the final 
estimates, and does not include the work done by the contractors 
as extra work, or the engineering or the preliminary and additional 
work done by day-labor forces. 

Quantities and Cost of Work done in the Construction of the Weston Aqueduct. 



Class of Work. 



Quantity. 


Cost. 


659,231 


$232,588 


321,245 


79,126 


380,813 


4,396 


46,735 


76,735 


66,201 


391,162 


11,838 


9,819 


12,165 


3,485 


14,210 


160,379 


76 


912 


72,193 


286,650 


57,883 


314,120 


22,451 


134,575 


375 


13,805 


81 


1,777 


7,560 


3,599 


162 


113 


1,077 


3,309 


1,065 


2,488 


107 


3,216 


4,756 


101,305 


2 


7,200 


11 


70,384 


- 


70,000 



Cost per 
Unit. 



Earth excavation (cubic yards), " . 

Borrowed earth (cubic yards), 

Overhaul (cubic yaida) 

Rock excavation (cubic yards), 

Tunnel excavation (cubic yards), 

Dry filling over arch in tunnel (linear feet), 

Tunnel drainage (linear feet), . . 

Brick masonry not in tunnel (cubic yards), ' 

Brick masonry in tunnel (cubic yards) 

Natural cement concrete masonry not in tunnel (cubic yards), 

Portland cement concrete masonry not in tunnel (cubic yards), 

Portland cement concrete masonry in tunnel (cubic yards), . 

Dimension stone masonry (cubic yards), 

Ashlar masonry (cubic yards), . . 

Face dressing of pointed work (square feet), 

Face dressing of six-cut work (square feet), 

Dry rubble stone masonry and paving (cubic yards), . 

Riprap (cubic yards) 

Lumber (feet B. M.), 

Furnishing and laying 7. 5-foot steel pipe (linear feet), . 

60-inch Venturi meters, 

Superstructures 

Iron and steel work, including 60 inch and 48-inch pipes between Sud- 
bury Dam and head-house, pipes for culverts, castings for siphon 
chambers, blow-off pipes for siphons, valves and steol and iron work 
for connections and chambers, including, generally, the cost of haul- 
ing and laying or placing same, 



24 

01 

1 64 
5 91 
83 
29 

11 29 

12 00 
3 97 
5 43 
5 99 

36 81 

21 94 

48 

70 

3 07 

2 34 
30 05 
21 30 

3,600 00 



100 



MKTUOPOUTAN WATEE 



[Tub. Doe. 



.-//// Cost of Work done in the Construction of the Weston Reser- 
voir, including the Open (Jim unci. 



Clabi of Work. 

iring and grabbing (acres), ' 

h ex oavation (cable yards) 

I hi for drain (cubic yards), 

'.; ik ezeavation (eabic yards) 

Rock excavation for drain and core wall (cubic yards), .... 

Cleaning surface of rock (square yards) 

Portland cement concrete masonry (cubic yards) 

Dimension stone masonry (cubic yards) 

Ashlar ma-nnry (cubic yards) 

Fare dressing of pointed work (square feet), 

Slope paving (cubic yards), 

Kiprap (cubic yards), 

Furnishing and laying IH-inch and 20-inch vitrified pipe (linear feet), . 



Quantity. 


Cost. 


37 


$3,749 


641,23ft 


198,155 


5,369 


4,295 




8,124 


2,360 


5,900 




516 


3,537 


18,345 


39 


1,194 


46 


830 


1,036 


425 


1,171 


4,684 


3,235 


3,235 


296 


740 



Cost per 
Unit. 



$101 32 
31 

80 

1 38 

2 50 
10 
5 19 

30 60 
18 05 

41 
4 00 

1 00 

2 50 



Quantities and Cost of Work done vpon the Supply Pipe Lines from the 
Weston Aqueduct to Main Pipes near Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 



Class of Work. 



Quantity. 1 Cost. 



Cost per 
Unit. 



60-inch cast-iron pipe from terminal chamber, Weston Aqueduct, to 
west bank of Charles River (linear feet), 

3 lines 60-inch cast-iron pipe under Charles River, laid in coffer-dam 
and covered with concrete, each line 345 feet long, equivalent to 
(linear feet) 

48-inch cast-iron pipe, Charles River to Chestnut Dill Reservoir, includ- 
ing cost of resurfacing roadways and changing drains and water pipes 
by city of Newton (linear feet) 

Driveway from Loring Street to terminal chamber (linear feet), . 

Cost of removing rock, and incidentally of removing earth, so that a 
second pipe could be laid beside the 48-inch cast-iron pipe without 
blasting, 

Total 



1,603 

1,035 

36,806 
1,720 



$32,643 

43,252 

436,617 
2,098 

11,679 



$526,289 



$20 36 

41 79 

11 86 
1 22 



At the end of the year the Weston Arjueduct and Reservoir had 
not only been wholly completed, but settlements had been made for 
contracts, land damages and claims to such an extent that it is fea- 
sible to estimate with substantial accuracy that the final cost of the 
aqueduct, exclusive of the reservoir, will be 82,516,000, equal to 
$198,000 per mile, and of the reservoir $344,000, making a total 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 101 

of $2,860,000. The total cost of the supply pipe line from the 
terminal chamber to a point near Chestnut Hill Reservoir will be 
substantially $600,000. 

The State Board of Health, in its report upon a Metropolitan 
Water Supply, estimated the cost of the Weston Aqueduct at 
$3,226,000. This, however, was for an aqueduct having a capacity 
of 250,000,000 gallons per day, as against a capacity of 300,000,000 
gallons per day for the aqueduct actually built, and did not include 
a reservoir in Weston, which it was thought would not be necessary 
in the beginning, and might be built at a subsequent date. The 
only feature included in the State Board of Health estimate and 
omitted in the construction was one of the two siphon pipes, which 
will not be required for at least fifteen years. 

Taking the works as constructed, without making any allowances, 
the actual cost has been $366,000 less than the original estimate; 
and, if an allowance is made for the reservoir which was constructed 
but not estimated, and for the siphon pipe which was estimated but 
not constructed, the difference between the actual and estimated cost 
of the whole work would be $580,000. A further allowance should 
be made because the aqueduct actually built has one-fifth more 
capacity than that estimated, but the amount of such an allowance 
cannot be readily determined. 

The cost per running foot or otherwise of different portions of 
the aqueduct and of the reservoir have been determined, with the 
following results, which include the cost of construction, engineer- 
ing and land, the expenses of administration, and all other cost 
except interest during construction : — 

Where the aqueduct is a tunnel, lined with concrete masonry, the 
cost for the portion which has a width of 10 feet was $39 per foot, 
equal to $207,000 per mile. 

For similar tunnels, which have a width of 13 feet 2 inches, the 
cost was $69 per foot, equal to $364,000 per mile. 

Where the aqueduct was built of masonry in a trench, and covered 
with earth, the cost for the portion which has a width of 10 feet was 
$23 per foot, equal to $120,000 per mile. 

Where it has a width of 13 feet 2 inches, the cost was $32 per 
foot, equal to $171,000 per mile. 

The two siphons, consisting of one pipe each, with the four siphon 
chambers, which were built for three pipes each, cover a total length 



102 METROPOLITAN WATFK [Pub. Doc. 

of 4,841 feet, and the cos< was $45 per foot, equal to $237,000 per 
mile. 

The single line of siphon pipe, exclusive of the siphon chambers, 
covers a total Length of 1,726 feet, and the cost with all appurte- 
nances was s:\\\ per foot, equal to 1191,000 per mile. 

The open channel, 1,366 feet long, which was excavated where 
the average depth of cutting was L9J feet, exclusive of the structures 
at its ends, cost $3 1 per foot, and exclusive of land damages $25 
per foot. 

The Weston Reservoir, which cost $344,000, including the screen- 
chamber at its lower end, serves as a substitute for 4,000 feet of 
aqueduct, and its cost was ^Sti per linear foot. As a reservoir its 
available capacity is about 200,000,000 gallons, making the cost per 
million gallons $1,720. 

DISTRIBUTION DEPARTMENT. 
Dexter Brackett, Department Engineer. 
A considerable part, of the time of the department engineer and 
his assistants has been spent upon the preparation of plans, statistics 
and estimates in connection with the suit brought by the cities of 
Maiden, Medford and Melrose for damages on account of the taking 
of Spot Pond. A considerable part of the time of the assistants has 
also been taken up in making record plans of work done in previous 
years. There has been no actual work chargeable to construction, 
except the placing of a Yenturi meter. 

OFFICE FORCE. 

Frank T. Daniels, Principal Office Assistant ; Samuel E. Killam, Office 

Assistant. 

The following is a statement of the more important work upon 
which the drafting department has been engaged during the year. 

For the Wachusett Reservoir, working drawings were made for 
the Maiden Brook culvert and for the false works for the West 
Boylston arch. 

For the Wachusett Dam there have been made general plans and 
details of the bastion and abutment at the ends of the dam, of the 
upper gate-chamber, of the highway bridge over the lower end of 
the w r aste channel, of several retaining walls, of flights of steps 
leading from the bottom of the valley up the hillsides to the ends 
x)f the dam, plans for grading and drainage about the dam, details of 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 103 

steel trestles for a foot bridge along the waste-weir, of steelwork for 
the bastion and upper and lower gate-chambers, of wooden gates 
and of bronze stop-plank grooves. A direct steam heating plant for 
the lower gate-chamber was designed, and the necessary drawings 
for its installation were furnished. 

In connection with the relocation of the Central Massachusetts 
Railroad, detailed drawings were made for a masonry skew-arch 
railroad bridge over the upper end of the waste channel. The gen- 
eral design for this bridge and for the highway bridge over the waste 
channel were furnished by Olmsted Brothers, landscape architects. 
A set of 12 plans, showing in detail the relocated portions of the 
railroad and tracings of the same, were completed, together with a 
profile, and sent to the Boston & Maine Railroad. 

Other drawings made included drawings for the screening appa- 
ratus at the head chamber of the Weston Aqueduct, and a drawing 
for the extension of the Clinton sewerage works. 

The whole number of finished drawings completed during the 
year is 123. Besides these, various studies and minor drawings 
were made and a few drawings were changed to adapt them to serve 
as record plans. 

The force employed in the drafting department numbered 7. 

Samuel E. Killam has had charge of the general office, where the 
work is of a varied character, such as making miscellaneous inves- 
tigations and computations, procuring supplies and making blue 
prints. Mr. Killam has also had general charge of the photo- 
graphic work. 

Accidents. 

Five fatal accidents have occurred during the year, three at the 
Wachusett Dam, one upon the railroad from the quarry to the dam, 
and one upon the Wachusett Reservoir. 

The first four accidents occurred in connection with the work of 
the Mc Arthur Brothers Company. At the dam a masonry inspector 
had the bone of his thigh broken by being caught between a stone 
which was being raised and the masonry of the dam, and as a result 
of his injuries died thirteen weeks later ; a masonry foreman was 
killed by the falling of the boom of a derrick ; and a laborer by 
the falling of a large stone which slipped from the grab-hooks. A 
blacksmith was killed by a collision on the quarry railroad. On 
Section 8 of the Wachusett Reservoir a laborer was killed by falling 
under a train on the contractor's railroad. 



KM METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 



MAINTENANCE. 

(Thin report upon DMintenaoM baa been oomplled from reports prepared i>y tin 1 engineer! in charge 

of tin- v:irioiiH ilopm latent! of llM work*. 

The WachusetJ Reservoir has been filled during the year to a 

greater extent than heretofore, and therefore is to a Larger extent 
in the charge of a maintenance force; otherwise the works main- 
tained and operated in L904 are the same as at the end of the pre- 
ceding year. 

Organization of Maintenance Forge. 

There has been an important change in the organization of the 
maintenance force daring the year, as already indicated briefly in 
the beginning of my report. The Sudbury and Cochituate works, 
which, after the resignation of Desmond FitzGerald, had no depart- 
ment engineer in charge, were on March 10 placed under the charge 
of Dexter Brackett, who was also at that time given the charge of 
the maintenance of the Weston Aqueduct. 

Charles E. Haberstroh, assistant superintendent of the Sudbury 
Department, has charge of the maintenance and operation of the 
works on the Sudbury River and Lake Cochituate, the Cochituate 
and Sudbury aqueducts and the Weston Aqueduct, from the Sud- 
bury Dam to the Weston Reservoir. 

George E. Wilde, assistant superintendent of the Distribution 
Department, has charge of the maintenance and operation of the 
Weston Reservoir, of that portion of the Weston Aqueduct between 
the reservoir and the terminal chamber in Weston, and of all the 
reservoirs and pipe lines within the Metropolitan District. 

John W. Lynch, engineer of the pumping stations, has continued 
in direct charge of the pumping stations at Chestnut Hill, and has 
had general supervision of the mechanical work at the other pump- 
ing stations of the Distribution Department. 

William E. Foss, division engineer, has had special charge of 
investigations relative to injury of water pipes by electrolytic action. 

Caleb M. Saville, division engineer, has continued in charge of 
the operation of Venturi meters in the Metropolitan District. 

Alfred O. Doane, division engineer, has continued in charge of 
engineering work connected with the maintenance and operation 
of the pumping stations and pipe lines. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 105 

The force employed on maintenance, including the permanent 
force, the additional temporary forces engaged from time to time 
on special work, and such of the engineers as devoted most of 
their time to maintenance, averaged 220. The maximum number 
employed at any one time was 291. 

Rainfall and Yield. 

The total rainfall for the year on the Sudbury watershed has 
been 3.4 inches below the average, the deficiency occurring wholly 
in the last three months. The yield of the watersheds has been 
somewhat below the average, but the deficiency occurred at such 
times that there was no unusual lowering of the reservoirs. Sta- 
tistics relating to rainfall and yield of watersheds may be found in 
Appendix No. 3, tables ]S T os. 1 to 11. 

Storage Reservoirs. 

The quantity of water stored in all of the storage reservoirs on 
January 1, 1904, was 13,136,900,000 gallons. On account of the 
extremely cold weather during the months of January and February 
the flow of the streams was small, and there was a constant lowering 
of the reservoirs until February 22, when they reached the lowest 
point, and contained 10,550,000,000 gallons. 

During March the reservoirs filled rapidly, and early in April 
were as full as it was desirable to hold them until the freshet season 
was over; subsequently they were filled gradually, reaching the 
maximum storage of a little more than 26,000,000,000 gallons on 
June 8. 

Until the middle of September there was an almost continual loss 
of storage, when the heavy rainfall on September 14 and 15 caused 
a gain of 1,100,000,000 gallons in a period of three days, after 
which the quantity stored again diminished continuously until De- 
cember 27. During the last few days of the year there was a slight 
gain, and at the end of the year the quantity stored was 15,638,- 
100,000 gallons. 

The following table gives the quantity of water stored in the 
storage reservoirs at the beginning of each month : — - 



106 



MKTKOPOUTAN YYATKR 



[Pul). Dov. 



Quantity of Water stored 
bury and Corfu' tu ate 



in Wachusett Reservoir, and in Reservoirs on Sud- 
Watersheds, at the Beginning of Each Month. 



I»ATK. 



In 
Wachusett 

Reservoir 
(Gallons). 



J 11 Sudbury 
Reservoir and 

Kraminvhnm 

Reservoir No. 3 

(Gallons). 



Id All Other 

Storage 

Reservoirs 

(Gallons). 



Total 

(Gallons). 



I'M) I. 

January 1, 
February 1, 
March 1, . 
April |, . 
May], . 
June 1, . . . 
Julyl, . 
August 1, . 
September 1, . 
October 1, 
November 1, 
December 1, . 

1905. 

January 1, 



1,760,100,000 
1,374,600,000 
1,098,500,000 
8,385,000,000 
9,863,100,000 
10,107,500,000 
9,401,900,000 
7,885,800,000 
6,807,300,000 
6,869,400,000 
7,192,800,000 
6,951,500,000 

4,409,600,000 



5,226,600,000 
4,626,600,000 
5,195,100,000 
7,666,900,000 
8,112,800,000 
8,380,400,000 
8,200,900,000 
8,218,900,000 
7,951,700,000 
7,725,500)000 
6,659,600,000 
6,419,100,000 

7,912,500,000 



6,150,200,000 
5,811,800,000 
5,472,000,000 
6,898,100,000 
7,460,500,000 
7,525,600,000 
7,540,200,000 
7,234,900,000 
6,503,700,000 
5,975,700,000 
5,320,000,000 
4,310,700,000 

3,316,000,000 



13,136,900,000 
11,813,000,000 
11,765,600,000 
22,950,000,000 
25,436,400,000 
26,013,500,000 
25,143,000,000 
23,339,600,000 
21,262,700,000 
20,570,600,000 
19,172,400,000 
17,681,300,000 

15,638,100,000 



Wachusett Reservoir. — At the beginning of the year work on 
the Wachusett Reservoir was so far advanced that it was possible to 
store water to elevation 331.50, which is 47.50 feet above the bottom 
of the 48-inch cast-iron pipes through the dam. The dam itself was 
enough higher to permit the water to be safely raised to this height. 
It was raised nearly to the full height early in April and to the full 
height in the middle of May, where it was maintained until June 11. 
When at elevation 331.50 the reservoir contained 10,117,000,000 
gallons of water. Most of the time after June 11 water was drawn 
from this reservoir in sufficient quantities to keep the Sudbury Res- 
ervoir nearly full, but for about a month, beginning October 20, the 
flow was stopped, to permit the Sudbury Reservoir to be drawn down. 
At the end of the year the water was 33 feet above the bottom of 
the 48-inch pipes, and the reservoir contained 4,409,600,000 gal- 
lons of water. Between April 26 and 29 there Avas a rainfall of over 
4 inches, which raised the water in the reservoir temporarily to ele- 
vation 331.89. At this time the gates which control the flow of 
water through the four 48-inch pipes which pass through the dam 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 107 

were fully opened, and the water flowed through at the rate of 
1,231,000,000 gallons per 24 hours. Water was wasted into the 
river below the dam, because of lack of storage capacity, on 43 
days between April 9 and June 11, the total amount of waste being 
about 8,600,000,000 gallons. 

Sudbury Reservoir. — At the beginning of the year the water of 
this reservoir was at elevation 252.63, which is 6.37 feet below the 
stone, crest of the dam. The lowest level during the year was 
reached on January 28, when the water stood at elevation 249.82. 
During February and March the reservoir was filling, and on April 
4 the water reached the level of the crest of the dam. The reservoir 
was kept substantially full from that time until October 1. During 
October and November the water was lowered about 6 feet, in order 
to facilitate the laying of a water pipe across the reservoir at the 
Burnett estate in Southborough. On the completion of this work 
the reservoir was again filled, and on January 1, 1905, the water 
stood .18 of a foot above the stone crest of the dam. 

The driveway from the highway to the Sudbury Dam, which had 
been badly worn by heavy teaming during the construction of the 
Weston Aqueduct, has been thoroughly repaired. A wooden build- 
ing, 58 feet by 22 feet, arranged for a workshop and for the storage 
of tools and vehicles, has been added to the group of buildings near 
the Sudbury Dam. The house, barn and shed at the dam, and the 
house on the Bigelow place, have been painted. 

A swampy area on the west side of Maple Street in Marlborough 
was, at the request of the city authorities of Marlborough, filled to 
about 12 inches above the ordinary water level. For this purpose 
221 cubic yards of material were purchased, and the balance required 
was obtained by cutting down the higher ground to about the level 
of the filled area. 

The Marlborough Brook filter-beds have been in service through- 
out the year, and have filtered all of the water received from the 
brook except for parts of six days during freshets. The beds were 
cleaned during the year, and the dirty sand, including sand from two 
previous years' cleaning of the artificial beds which had been left at 
the sides of these beds, was removed to a spoil bank. A layer of 
clean sand 2^- inches thick Avas spread on the surface of beds Nos. 1 
and 2 and on one-half of bed No. 5. The settling reservoir was also 
emptied and cleaned. 



L08 METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc 

The analyses which have been made monthly by the State Board 
of Health of the water before and after passing through the filter- 
beds show thai the water has been generally satisfactorily purified 
by the filters. 

Additional storage for water discharged by the brook during 
freshets has been provided by the enlargement of storage basin No. 
18, increasing its capacity from 2,600,000 gallons to 9,000,000 gal- 
lon-. The embankments surrounding the basin, 3 feet wide on top, 
with slopes of 3 horizontal to 1 vertical, were constructed of material 
excavated from the interior of the basin, and the inner slopes pro- 
tected with stones taken from the excavation. About 3,300 cubic 
yards of material were moved in doing this work. The basin is 
connected by means of a 12-inch cast-iron pipe 210 feet long with 
the artificial filter-beds Nos. 12 and 17, so that about 8, 500, 000 
gallons can be drawn from the basin to filter-beds Nos. 5, (>, 11, 12, 
15 and 17. 

The combined storage reservoir and filter-bed for taking care of 
the overflow from the Marlborough Brook main sewer during times 
of freshet has taken care of all the overflow during the year. For 
the greater portion of the time from February 22 until May 7 there 
was a flow from the sewer to the bed, although for a portion of this 
time the flow was due to the entrance of ground water into the 
overflow sewer. After May 7 there was a very small flow of ground 
water for some time. The largest quantity of diluted sewage stored 
was on April 30, when it reached elevation 270, which is 3.25 feet 
below the overflow into an additional storage area. 

As the sewage flowing in the open channel from the end of the 
overflow sewer to the filter-bed gave some offence to the people 
residing in the house on the opposite side of Farm Road, an 18-inch 
Akron pipe 212 feet long was substituted for the open channel. A 
channel was also dug from that part of the bed into which the 
sewage first enters to the lower bed, so that the upper bed can be 
drained when desired. An 8-inch tile drain, 385 feet long, was 
built on the east side of Farm Road, near the toe of the filter-bed 
embankment, to carry away the water which percolates through the 
embankment, and the travelled portion of the road was raised about 
1 foot for a distance of 300 feet. 

Framing ham Reservoir j¥o. 3. — This reservoir was kept at or 
near high- water mark during the whole year. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 109 

Framingham Reservoir JSfo. 2. — This reservoir was kept practi- 
cally full throughout the year. No water was drawn from it for the 
supply of the Metropolitan District until August 30, but after that 
date a portion of the supply was drawn from this source almost 
continually until the end of the year. While water was being 
drawn from the reservoir the surface was kept near high- water mark 
by drawing water from the Ashland, Hopkinton and' Whitehall reser- 
voirs. On several days between September 14 and 21 water was 
drawn from the reservoir and discharged into Lake Cochituate. 

Framingliam Reservoir No. 1. — This reservoir was kept full and 
water was wasted over the clam from the beginning of the year until 
September 1. From September 14 to 18, inclusive, and September 
21 to 23, inclusive, and on November 29 and 30, water was drawn 
from the reservoir and discharged into Lake Cochituate. 

Repairs have been made to the paving in the channel of the Sud- 
bury River below Framingham Dam No. 1, which had been displaced 
by the action of the water during freshets. The paving from the 
dam to a point below the Winter Street bridge has been relaid, and 
the interstices between the stones filled with fine Portland cement 
concrete. Below the bridge the paving was not relaid, but concrete 
was placed between and on the stones, making the bottom of the 
channel smooth. A large hole in the bed of the river, just below 
the paving, was partially filled with gravel excavated near by. At 
the upper end of the reservoir the water overflowing at the dam of 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3 had gradually excavated a hole which 
threatened to undermine the original 48-inch pipe-line leading from 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3 to the dam of Reservoir No. 1. The 
hole has been partially filled with gravel, and the surface covered 
with riprap to protect it against washing in the future. There were 
1,016 feet of wire fence built on the property line between the land 
of the Commonwealth and land of Adnah Neyhart. 

Ashland Reservoir. — At the beginning of the year the water in 
this reservoir was 4.33 feet below high water. Early in April the 
water reached the level of the overflow, and the reservoir remained 
substantially full until the last of August. During September, Oc- 
tober, November and December water was drawn from the reservoir, 
and on December 27 its surface had been lowered to 192.73, or 
32.48 feet below high water. At the end of the year it was 31.34 
feet below high water. The joints between the coping stones of the 



no METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 

Bide-walls of the wasteway al the dam have been cut out and re- 
pointed. 

Hopkinton Reservoir. — This reservoir was 5.1b 1 feet below high 
water at the beginning of the year. It was full on May 1, and re- 
mained practically full until the first week in September. During 
the last four months of the year water was drawn from (his reservoir, 
and on December 27 the surface was 32.6 feet below high water. 
About one-third of the water drawn from the reservoir was filtered. 
The filter-beds were cleaned in June. 

Whitehall Reservoir. — This reservoir has been kept practically 
full, and was not drawn upon until December 16. From that date 
until the end of the year 20,000,000 gallons per day were drawn, 
lowering its surface about 1 foot ; and on January 1, 1905, it stood 
at elevation 336.74, or 1.17 feet below high water. 

Farm Pond. — Farm Pond was practically full during the first 
half of the year, but was then gradually drawn down until the 
middle of September, when it was 1.25 feet below high water. It 
was then partially refilled with water drawn from Framingham Res- 
ervoirs Nos. 1 and 2. No water was drawn from the pond during 
the year for the use of the Metropolitan District, and it was not 
necessary to waste any into the Sudbury River. 

Lake Cochituate. — Lake Cochituate at the beginning of the year 
was 1.94 feet below high water. It fell during January and Feb- 
ruary, and was 4.56 feet below high water on February 22. It was 
filled by May 6, and was kept practically full until July 26. The 
surface then fell steadily until September 14, when the surface was 
3.85 feet below high water. Water was then turned into the lake 
from Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, raisin <r its surface on 
October 10 to within about 1 foot of high water. The lowest point 
reached during the year w r as 5.12 feet below high water, on Decem- 
ber 17. Water was wasted at the outlet dam in varying quantities 
during March, April, May and June. Water was drawn from the 
lake for the supply of the Metropolitan District from January 1 to 
April 3, April 6 to 9, April 11 to 17, April 18 to 25, May 3 to 7, 
July 3 to 7, July 26 to August 2, and August 6 to December 19. 

All of the joints in the exterior stonew T ork of the aqueduct gate- 
house were cut out and repointed, and tw T o cornice stones which 
were damaged by fire several years ago were replaced by new stones. 
A damaged composition stem of one of the aqueduct gates was 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. Ill 

replaced by a steel stem furnished by the Coffin Valve Company. 
The foreman's house was painted two coats, and a trussed wire fence 
592 feet long was built along the road near the house. 

No water was drawn from Dudley Pond into Lake Cochituate. 
At the beginning of the year the pond was 3.41 feet below high- 
water mark. The highest elevation was 155.11, or 1.35 feet below 
high water, and the elevation at the end of the year was 153.12. 

The surface of Dug Pond has varied between 1.5 feet above and 3 
feet below the invert of the 18 -inch overflow pipe. 

The Pegan Brook filter-beds have been in use throughout the year 
whenever there was water to filter. Water was pumped to the beds 
during 183 days from the reservoir on Pegan Brook or from the new 
reservoir at the end of the intercepting ditch which collects water 
from the brooks formerly draining into Pegan Brook meadow. The 
total quantity of water pumped during the year was 223,402,500 
gallons, of which 150,650,500 gallons was from Pegan Brook and 
72,752,000 gallons from the intercepting ditch. The total quantity 
of coal consumed was 113,941 pounds, so that 1,961 gallons of water 
were pumped per pound of coal. The cost of operating the pump- 
ing station and caring for the filter-beds and grounds was $3,088.16, 
making the cost per million gallons pumped $13.82. 

Sources from which Water has been taken. 

An average of 88,554,000 gallons per day was drawn from the 
Wachusett Reservoir through the Wachusett Aqueduct into the Sud- 
bury Reservoir. An average of 30,575,000 gallons per day was 
drawn from the Sudburv Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct 
into the distribution system of the Metropolitan District. From 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3 an average of 64,827,000 gallons per 
day, and from Framingham Reservoir No. 2 an average of 9,004,000 
gallons per day, was drawn through the Sudbury Aqueduct to Chest- 
nut Hill Reservoir. An average of 14,984,000 gallons per day was 
drawn from Lake Cochituate through the Cochituate Aqueduct to 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir. The Spot Pond drainage area furnished 

497,000 gallons per day. 

Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct has been in use 283 days during the 
year. It was very thoroughly cleaned between November 16 and 22. 
The work of repairing the transverse cracks in the aqueduct, due to 



112 METROPOLITAN WATEK [Pub. Doc. 

temperature changes, was in progress at the beginning of the year, 
and was t'ullv described in the last annual report. This work was 
carried on continuously until January 26, when it was finished. A 
force of about 26 men, consisting principally of masons who had 
been engaged during the warmer weather on the construction of the 
Wachusetl Dam, was employed. The usual work of maintenance 
along the line of the aqueduot has been performed, and the aqueduct 
and its appurtenances are in excellent condition. 

The Sudbury Aqueduct was emptied for cleaning on May 5 and 
(1, and again on May 12 and 1."). On June 23 it was emptied for 
the purpose of examining the Waban Bridge, and from September 14 
to 18, from September 21 to 23, from October 2 to 9, and from 
October 23 to 30, it was emptied for the purpose of making repairs 
to and lining the aqueduct on the Waban Bridge. At times while 
the aqueduct was emptied for cleaning and for making repairs at the 
Waban Bridge, and also on November 29 and 30, water was run 
from Framingham Reservoirs, Nos. 1, 2 and 3 through the aqueduct 
to Lake Cochituate. The total amount diverted to the lake was 
1,157,200,000 gallons, of which ( .»»;:;, 200,000 gallons was drawn 
from Framingham Reservoir No. 1, 118,300,000 gallons from Fram- 
ingham Reservoir No. 2, and 75,700,000 gallons from Framingham 
Reservoir No. 3. The daily average flow through the aqueduct to 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir for the year was 73,831,000 gallons, which 
is 24,190,000 gallons less than the corresponding quantity for the 
preceding year. 

The leakage from the aqueduct at the Waban Bridge, due to cracks 
in the masonry, had increased during the past few years to such an 
extent as to cause a lar^e loss of water, as well as to injure the 
masonry of the bridge by freezing during the winter. Upon ex- 
amination, the principal cracks were found to be in the invert two 
feet from the centre of the aqueduct. They were sometimes on 
only one side of the centre, but generally on both, and were directly 
over the joints between stones which cover drainage galleries beneath 
the aqueduct. As there were few if any cracks above the springing 
line of the upper arch up to the highest point reached by the water 
when the aqueduct is in use, the repairs which were made extended 
only from the bottom up to the springing line. This portion of the 
aqueduct for the entire length of the bridge, a distance of hfrlrlh 
feet, was lined with sheet lead weighing 3^ pounds per square foot,. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 113 

covered on the bottom with a protective layer of Portland cement 
concrete 1\ inches thick. The lead is held in place at the springing 
line by 21 by 2\ inch angle irons, secured by T 9 g inch diameter yellow 
metal bolts set in the masonry. Rubber tubing was placed back of 
the angle irons between the sheet lead and the masonry, to act as a 
washer to prevent leakage. The sheets of lead 9 by 14 feet were 
connected by the process of lead burning so as to form a continuous 
sheet. The layer of Portland cement concrete 1^ inches thick was 
composed of fine material, in which was embedded expanded metal. 
Before the aqueduct was lined all cracks were pointed or grouted, 
and two coats of Portland cement wash were applied to the arch. 
All cracks in the aqueduct for 50 feet from both ends of the lining- 
were cut out and pointed. The work has resulted in reducing the 
leakage to a very small quantity, which it is thought will cause no 
damage. 

While the work at the Waban Bridge was in pr ogress, all the 
cracks in the interior masonry at the Echo Bridge over the Charles 
River were cut out and pointed. 

In September changes were made in the Beaver Dam Brook cul- 
vert, for the purpose of increasing its capacity. The work done 
consisted in the removal of portions of the masonry so as to enlarge 
the channels at the entrance and outlet, and in rounding the corners 
of other portions of the masonry so as to reduce losses of head. As 
the culvert is below the level of the water in the brook, it was nec- 
essary to operate a centrifugal pump while the work was in progress, 
to take care of the water. 

The joints in the masonry of 14 culverts between Waban Bridge 
and the west siphon chamber have been cut out and repointed. The 
iron gratings and beams in the siphon and waste-weir chambers, and 
the manhole covers, have been given two coats of paint, and the 
iron and wooden fences at both the Echo and Waban bridges have 
been given one coat. There were 1,575 feet of board fence built 
near the Course Brook waste-weir, and 250 feet at Harrison Street in 
Newton Highlands ; 440 feet of trussed wire fence were built in 
South Framingham, and posts set for 1,400 feet just east of Speen 
Street near the Course Brook waste-weir. 

An apparatus for rating current meters has been established at the 
side of the aqueduct embankment near the Farm Pond gate-house. 

During the year the city of Newton built a 48 by 53 inch brick 



Ill METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc 

sewer under the aqueduct, about 500 feet east of Woodward Street. 
The invert of the sower was 27 feet below the invert of the aqueduct, 
and the material underlying the aqueduct was very fine sand. In 
order to avoid any Injury to the aqueduct, compressed air was used 
in excavating a tunnel under the aqueduct in which to build the 
sewer, and the work was successfully accomplished. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was in use 2")!) days. The interior of 
the aqueduct, with the exception ot the siphon pipes, was cleaned on 
April 2$ to 30. The survc3*s for locating the aqueduct and deter- 
mining the position of property bounds have been continued, and 
51 alignment bounds and 52 property bounds have been set. 

The West/on Aqueduct was in use 320 days. The flow was shut 
off for about three weeks in April, in order to give opportunity for 
completing the Weston Reservoir. At this time several cracks in 
the aqueduct masonry on sections 10 and 15 were cut out and 
pointed, and the brick masonry on Section 15 was given a coat of 
cement wash. From June 16 to 20 the aqueduct was shut off while 
the concrete bottom and sidewalls of the terminal chamber were plas- 
tered for the purpose of preventing leakage. During the last two 
weeks of the year the aqueduct was emptied for the purpose of cut- 
ting out and pointing the fine transverse cracks in the concrete ma- 
sonry, caused by temperature changes. A force of 30 masons and 10 
laborers was engaged on this work, which will be continued for a 
month or more during the coming year. The methods employed 
for this work are the same as for similar work at the Wachusett 
Aqueduct, described on page 151 of the last annual report. 

Pumping Stations. 

Seventy-four per cent, of all the water supplied to the Metropol- 
itan Water District has been pumped at the two stations at Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir ; the remainder was delivered by gravity. 

The total quantity pumped at all of the stations during the year 
was 34,962,090,000 gallons, or 6,854,110,000 gallons less than 
during the preceding year. The cost of operating the stations was 
$91,411.63, equivalent to $2,615 per million gallons pumped. Al- 
though the average height to which the water was pumped in 1904 
was 86.87 feet, as against 68.50 feet in 1903, there has been a 
decrease in the cost per million gallons pumped of SO. 195, due to a 
reduction in the cost of repairs and fuel. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



115 



The cost per gross ton of fuel used at the Chestnut Hill high- 
service station was $1.41 less, at the Chestnut Hill low-service 
station $1.43 less, and at the Spot Pond station $0.92 less, than 
during the preceding year. This reduction was due both to the 
reduced price of coal and to the use of a larger proportion of 
anthracite buckwheat coal and screenings. 

Notwithstanding the use of a larger proportion of the cheaper 
grades of fuel, the duty developed by the engines at the Chestnut 
Hill and Spot Pond stations was between 3 and 4 per cent, greater 
than during the preceding year. 

Tests have been made to determine the viscosity, specific gravity 
and burning point of all oil, and the calorific value of all coal used 
at the several stations. 

Coal for use at the several stations has been purchased as fol- 
lows : — 





Gross Tons. 






Chestnut 
Hill High- 


Chestnut 
Hill Low- 


Spot 
Pond 


West 
Roxbury 


Arling- 
ton 


Price 

per Gross 

Ton. 




service 
Station. 


service 
Station. 


Station. 


Station. 


Station. 




Bay State Fuel Company, bituminous, . 


37.17 


56.01 


_ 


_ 


_ 


$5 36 


Dartmouth Coal Company, bituminous, 


30.87 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 79 


Dartmouth Coal Company, bituminous, 


- 


181.90 


- 


- 


- 


4 56 


Henry T. Woods, bituminous, 


671.56 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 49 


Henry T. Woods, bituminous, 


- 


820.07 


- 


- 


- 


4 46 


Darrow-Mann Company, bituminous, . 


919.93 


720.36 


- 


- 


- 


4 35 


Murrell Coal Company, bituminous, 


332.31 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 18 


Dartmouth Coal Company, bituminous, 


1,031.25 


521.11 


- 


- 


- 


4 15 


Darrow-Mann Company, bituminous, . 


- 


106.42 


- 


- 


- 


4 02 


Dartmouth Coal Company, bituminous, 


- 


102.39 


- 


- 


- 


3 98 


E. B. Townsend, buckwheat anthracite, 


493.08 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 28 


E. B. Townsend, buckwheat anthracite, 


- 


998.87 


- 


- 


- 


3 08 


E. B. Townsend, screenings, . 


- 


10.15 


- 


- 


- 


3 67 


E. B. Townsend, screenings, . 


20.54 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 44 


E. B. Townsend, screenings, . 


- 


77.30 


- 


- 


- 


3 18 


Gillespie & Pierce, screenings, 


161.63 


2.49 


- 


- 


- 


2 24 


Bay State Fuel Company, screenings, . 


479.50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 24 


Locke Coal Company, bituminous, 


- 


- 


700.00 


- 


- 


4 40 


Locke Coal Company, screenings, . 


- 


- 


414.68 


- 


- 


2 24 


D. J. Cutter & Co., anthracite, 


- 


- 


- 


285.58 


- 


$7 28 and 7 56 


Peirce & Winn Company, bituminous, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


346.30 


4 48 to 5 04 


Wellington Wild Coal Company, bitu- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22.43 


4 76 


minous. 














Peirce & Winn Company, screenings, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


151.64 


2 24 


Total gross tons, bituminous, . 


3,023.09 


2,508.26 


700.00 


- 


368.73 


- 


Total gross tons, anthracite, 


493.08* 


998.87* 


- 


285.58 


- 


- 


Total gross tons, anthracite screen- 


661.67 


89.94 


414.68 


- 


151.64 


- 


ings. 
Average price per gross ton, bitu- 


$4 31 


$4 35 


$4 40 


- 


$4 68 


_ 


minous. 














Average price per gross ton, anthra- 
cite. 
Average price per gross ton, anthra- 


3 28* 


3 08* 


- 


$7 36 


- 


- 


2 28 


3 21 


2 24 


_ 


2 24 


_ 


cite screenings. 















* Buckwheat. 



in; 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Chestnut 1 1 ill High-service Station, 

The water used in the high-service district of Boston, in the city 
oi' Quinoy and the towns of Watertown, Belmont and Milton, was 
pumped at this station. 

The following are the statistics relating to the operations at this 
station : — 



Engines 
Nob. land 2, 



Engine 
No. 3. 



Engine 
No. 4. 



Total quantity pumped (million gallons), . 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Total coal used (pounds), . 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, . 
Average head pumped against (feet), 
Cost of pumping : — 

Labor 

Fuel 

Repairs, . 

Oil, waste and packing, . 

Small supplies 

Totals 

Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



576.20 

1,574,000 

1,012,902 

568.12 

120.69 

$1,908 35 

1,866 74 

149 64 

64 52 

142 09 



$4,131 34 

$7,170 

.059 



292.86 

800,000 

279,676 

1,047.14 

127.90 

$473 27 

471 12 

344 10 

16 00 

22 03 



$1,326 52 

$4,529 

.035 



10,522.76 

28,751,000 

8,656,737 

1,215.56 

129.30 

$12,885 18 

15,113 17 

516 16 

438 64 

614 26 



$29,567 41 
$2,810 | 
.022 I 



Totals for 
Station. 



11,391.81 

31,125,000 

9,949,315 

1,144.98 

128.83 

$15,266 80 

17,451 03 

1,009 90 

519 16 

778 38 



$35,025 27 

$3,075 

.024 



The quantity pumped was nearly 4 per cent, greater, and the cost 
per million gallons pumped was $1,704 less, than during the previous 
year. The greater part of the reduction in the cost of pumping was 
due to decreased cost of fuel and repairs. 

Chestnut Hill Low-service Station. 

The quantity of water pumped at this station was 27.8 per cent, 
less than during the year 1903, the reduction being due to the use 
of the Weston Aqueduct. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 



Total quantity pumped (million gallons), 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Total coal used (pounds), 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 
Average head pumped against (feet), . 



Engines 
Nos. 5, 6 and 7. 

20,263.94 

55,380,000 

8,662,868 

2,339.75 

54.91 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



117 



Cost of pumping . — 
Labor, 
Fuel, 
Repairs, . 

Oil, waste and packing, 
Small supplies, 

Total for station, 

Cost per million gallons pumped, . 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 

The cost per million gallons pumped was $0,176 more than for the 
year 1903. This was due to the decrease in the quantity pumped, 
and to an increase of 17 feet in the average head pumped against. 



Engines 
Nos. 5, 6 and 7. 


. $15,593 


00 


. 15,720 


63 


1,190 


77 


522 


54 


837 


21 


. $33,864 


15 


$1,671 


.030 



Spot Pond Pumping Station. 

The 20,000,000-gallon Holly engine pumped all the water at this 
station. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 



Total quantity pumped (million gallons), 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Total coal used (pounds), 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 
Average head pumped against (feet), 

Cost of pumping : — 
Labor, 
Fuel, 

Repairs, . 

Oil, waste and packing, 
Small supplies, 

Total for station, 

Cost per million gallons pumped, . 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



Engine No. 9. 

2,927.47 
7,999,000 
2,462,802 

1,188.67 
129.33 

$7,070 49 

3,990 00 

183 55 

t 158 40 

' 466 35 

$11,868 79 

$4,054 
..031 



.52 less than during 



The cost per million gallons pumped was 
the previous year, due to the reduction in the cost of fuel, and the 
use during the entire year of the more economical engine. 



West Poxhuvy Pumping Station. 

At this station water was pumped for supplying the higher por- 
tions of West Roxbury and Milton. 



118 



MKTROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 



Pumps operated 6,558 boors; average, 18 hours per day 
Daily average quantity of water pumped (gallons), 
Daily average quantity of coal consumed (pounds), 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 
Average lift in feet, 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Repairs and small supplies, .... 

Total for station, 

Cost per million gallons pumped, . 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, . 



504,000 

1,683 

300 

133 

12,960 14 

2,054 34 

298 03 

$5,312 51 

$28,799 
.217 



The quantity pumped was 82,000 gallons per day, or nearly 20 
per cent, greater than during, the year 1903, while the cost of 
operating remained nearly the same. The cost per million gallons 
pumped was $5.55 less than for the previous year. 

Arlington Pumping Station. 

All water supplied to the town of Lexington and to the high- 
service district of Arlington was pumped at this station. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 



Pumps operated 8,771 hours 30 minutes; average, 24 hours per day 

Daily average quantity of water pumped (gallons), 

Daily average quantity of coal consumed (pounds), 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Average lift in feet, 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Repairs and small supplies, 

Total for station, 

Cost per million gallons pumped, .... 
Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, . 



517,000 

3,000 

173 

282 

$3,089 58 

1,989 03 

262 30 

$5,340 91 

$28,199 
.100 



The cost per million gallons pumped was $3,766 less than during 
the year 1903, due to a reduction in the cost of fuel. 
The exterior of the building has been painted. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



119 



Consumption of Water. 

The daily average quantity of water consumed in the cities and 
towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works during the year 
1904 was 114,876,000 gallons, equal to 123.8 gallons per inhabitant 
in the district supplied. In addition to the above, 631,540,000 
gallons, equivalent to a daily average supply of 1,726,000 gallons, 
were supplied to the city of Cambridge . 

The consumption in the several districts was as follows : — 



Gallons 
per Day. 



Increase 
(Gallons 
per Day). 



Southern low-service district, embracing the low-service district of Boston, 
with the exception of Charlestown and East Boston 

Northern low-service district, embracing the low-service districts of Somer- 
ville, Chelsea, MaldeD, Medford, Everett, Arlington, Charlestown and East 
Boston, 

Southern high-service district, embracing the high-service districts of Boston, 
Quincy, Watertown, Belmont, and a portion of Milton 

Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Revere, Winthrop, Swamp. 
ecott, Nahant and Stoneham, and the high-service districts of Somerville, 
Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett and East Boston 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the highest portions of West 
Roxbury and Milton, 



Northern extra high-service district, embracing Lexington and the highest 
portions of Arlington, 



Totals, 



47,652,000 

27,630,000 
30,610,000 

7,963,000 
504,000 
517,000 



114,876,000 



3,924,000 

2,192,000 
1,083,000 

434,000 
82,000 
13,000 



7,728,000 



In June a portion of the Dorchester district of the city of Boston, 
containing about 9,000 people, was transferred from the southern 
low-service to the southern high-service district. With this excep- 
tion the area of the several districts remains substantially the same 
as in 1903. 

The increase of 7,728,000 gallons per day in the consumption 
during the past year was due to a great extent to the use of water to 
prevent freezing of service pipes during the unusually cold weather 
in January, February, March and December. In February the daily 
average quantity used was 139,941,000 gallons, which was 20,318,- 
000 gallons in excess of the quantity used in February, 1903 ; and 
the daily average for the months of January, February, March and 
December was 13,445,000 gallons more than during the correspond- 
ing months of the previous year, while the increase for the remain- 
ing eight months of the year was 4,886,000 gallons per day. 



L20 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pill). Dor. 



I taring the past \ car continuous measurements have been made by 
moans of Venturi meters of the water consumed in each city and 
town supplied from the Metropolitan Works. From these measure- 
ments can be determined the consumption of water at any hour of 
the day in any city or town; and in cases where the city or town is 
divided into low and high service districts, the rate of consumption 
in each of these districts can also be determined. 

The following diagram shows the daily average rate of consump- 
tion of water in the district supplied by the Metropolitan Works for 

Average Hate of Consumption in Metropolitan Water District and 
Average Temperature of Air at Chestnut Hill Reservoir for Each 
Week during J 904. 



Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec 

2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 5 12 19 26? 9 16 23 30 7 14 2128 4 il it 25 2 9 ifc 23 30 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 24 I 8 15 2? 29 5 I? )9 26 3 i0 17 24 3i 




2 9 lb 23 30 6 13 20 27 5 12 >•) 26 2 9 16 23 30 7 ia 2i 28 4 l| 18 25 1 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 Z4 I 8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26 3 10 17 24 31 

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug. Sept. Oct Nov Dec. 
Average Rate of Consumption for each week, thus 

between I and 4 A.M. for each week, thus 



mm 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



121 



each week during the year, also the rate of consumption between 
the hours of 1 and 4 a.m., and the average temperature^of the air for 
the week. It will be noticed that the largest consumption^ water 
occurred during the weeks when the temperature was lowest, and 
that the rate of consumption between the hours of 1 and 4 a.m. for 
several weeks in January and February was larger than the 24-hour 
rate during the summer months. 

The daily average consumption of water in each of the cities and 
towns supplied from the Metropolitan Works during the year 1904, 
as measured by the Venturi meters, was as follows : — 



Estimated 
Population. 



Boston, 
Somerville, 
Maiden, . 
Chelsea, . 
Everett, . 
Quincy, . 
Medford, . 
Melrose, . 
Revere, 
Watertown, 
Arlington, 
Milton, 
Winthrop, 
Stoneham, 
Belmont, . 
Lexington, 
Nahant, . 
Swampscoit, 
District, 



611,830 

70,320 

40,825 

37,835 

29,370 

27,830 

22,125 

14,445 

13,710 

11,250 

10,150 

7,740 

7,770 

6,420 

5,045 

3,620 

2,310 

6,170 



928,770 



Daily Average Con- 
sumption. 



Gallons. 



87,680,300 

6,228,300 

1,868,000 

4,260,500 

2,624,400 

2,823,200 

1,802,900 

1,525,100 

933,000 

623,600 

752,400 

316,300 

742,300 

558,300 

248,800 

282,700 

131,000 

521,200 



113,922,300 



Gallons per 
Capita. 



143 
89 
46 

113 
89 

101 
81 

106 
68 
55 
74 
41 
96 
87 
49 
78 
57 
84 



123 



A comparison of the figures in this table shows very plainly the 
great difference in the quantity of water consumed in different 
municipalities, and is of especial interest at the present time, for 
the reason that, in compliance with chapter 426 of the Acts of the 
year 1904, the measurements of the water used by each municipality 



122 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

during the year L905 will be used iii determining the assessment to 
be paid by each in 1906. Similar figures for each month of the 
vear are given in Appendix No. 3, Table No. 22. 

The autographic records furnished by the Venturi meters are fre- 
quently i)\' much assistance in delecting leaks from the pipes, and in 
determining the quantity of water used at large fires or for other 
purposes in excess of the ordinary consumption. A study of these 
records from week to week also furnishes much information of value 
in determining the causes of and in preventing the waste of water. 
For example, the Venturi meter supplying the town of Swampscott 
indicated, on February 14, an increase in the consumption from 
400,000 gallons to about 1,000,000 gallons per day. The local 
authorities were notified on February 16 that there was probably a 
large leak from their pipes, but it was not until February 26* that 
the cause was discovered and the leak repaired. Had it not been 
for the record of the meter, this leak, which was due to a broken 
8-inch pipe, would probably have continued for a long time, as it 
ran into a drain without showing on the surface of the ground. 

The consumption of water in the cities and towns supplied from 
the Metropolitan Works, as measured by the Venturi meters, is 
slightly less than the quantity supplied to the District, as deter- 
mined by pump measurements, and by the flow of the Weston Aque- 
duct as measured by a Venturi meter. The total difference is less 
than 1,000,000 gallons per day, a large part of which is accounted 
for by the quantity of water used at the pumping stations, and by 
the leakage from the 84.21 miles of pipes and the several distribut- 
ing reservoirs connected with the works, this use and leakage not 
being measured by the Venturi meters. 

Quality of the Water. 

Samples of water were collected every three months from four 
points, every two months from six points, and monthly from seven 
points on the works, and sent to the State Board of Health for 
analysis and examination. Samples of water were also collected 
each week from many points upon the works, and examined micro- 
scopically and for color, odor, taste and turbidity by the biological 
force of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

The quality of the water furnished was substantially the same as 
during the past two years. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



123 



The following table gives a comparison of the average results of 
the examinations of water from a tap in Boston for the years 1900 to 
1904, inclusive : — 



1900. 



1901. 



1902. 



1903. 



1904. 



State Board of Health Examinations. 
Color (Nessler standard), . 

Total residue 

Loss on ignition, 

Free ammonia ' . 

I total, . 
dissolved, . 
suspended, 

Chlorine 

Nitrogen as nitrates, 

Nitrogen as nitrites, 

Oxygen consumed 

Hardness, 



Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board 
Examinations, 
Color (platinum standard), 

Turbidity 

Total organisms, 
Amorphous matter, . 
Bacteria, .... 



0.24 

3.80 

1.20 

0.0012 

0.0157 

0.0138 

0.0019 

0.25 

0.0076 

0.0001 

0.38 

1.3 



34 



97 
181 



0.24 

4.43 

1.64 

0.0013 

0.0158 

0.0143 

0.0015 

0.30 

0.0173 

0.0001 

0.42 

1.7 



34 
2.0 
243 

38 
162 



0.26 

3.93 

1.56 

0.0016 

0.0139 

0.0119 

0.0020 

0.29 

0.0092 

0.0001 

0.40 

1.3 



33 
2.3 
367 

34 
164 



0.25 

3.98 

1.50 

0.0013 

0.0125 

0.0110 

0.0015 

0.30 

0.0142 

0.0001 

0.39 

1.5 



35 
2.2 
286 

36 
126 



0.23 

3.93 

1.59 

0.0023 

0.0139 

0.0121 

0.0018 

0.34 

0.0110 

0.0001 

0.37 

1.5 



32 
2.4 
303 

36 
176 



Note. — Chemical analyses are in parts per 100,000, organisms and amorphous matter in standard 
units per cubic centimeter, and bacteria in number per cubic centimeter. The standard unit has. an area 
of 400 square microns, and by its use the number of diatomaceae are decreased, and the number of 
chlorophyceaB and cyanophyceae are very much increased, as compared with the number of organisms. 

More than 8 per cent, of the water supplied to the Metropolitan 
District passes through Spot Pond, in which the color is reduced by 
the bleaching action due to long storage to about two-thirds that of 
the water supplied to the remainder of the District. 

Biological Laboratory. 

The laboratory has been in charge of Burton Gr. Philbrick, 
biologist. 

The samples of water have been taken weekly at twenty-nine 
points and fortnightly at six points on the works, and special sam- 
ples have been taken from time to time from the reservoirs and the 
brooks entering them, and from the filters at Marlborough, Hop- 
kinton and Lake Cochituate. There were made daring the year 
2,277 microscopical examinations, of which 1,756 Avere made in 
connection with the regular weekly samples, and 521 in connection 
with the miscellaneous samples. 

The Wachusett Reservoir has had water stored in it for the whole 
year for the first time, and the water in it now has the character- 
istics of a reservoir rather than a river water, in that it contains a 



124 METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc 

somewhat larger growth of microscopic organisms, and is to some 
extent decolorized by storage. The organisms have not been abun- 
dant, and the water has been practically free from odor. The color 
during the latter part of the season was much lower than that of the 
river water. 

In the Sudbury Reservoir and in Framingham Reservoir No. 3 
the microscopic organisms were more abundant in the latter half of 
the year than usual, causing an odor which was quite persistent, 
and which was reported from week to week by the biologist. The 
odor did not, however, become sufficiently strong to cause com- 
plaints from the water takers. 

In Lake Cochituate the organisms were unusually few for nearly 
the whole of the year, and the water of such satisfactory quality 
that it could be used during the greater part of the year. In De- 
cember, however, there was an abundant growth of Synura, which 
rendered the water for the time being unsuitable for use. 

The bacteriological work for the year consisted of routine weekly 
examinations, monthly examinations of the main feeders of the 
Sudbury Reservoir, of Framingham Reservoir No. 3 and of Lake 
Cochituate, monthly tests of the efficiency of the Pegan and Marl- 
borough Brook filters, and occasional miscellaneous examinations. 
A total of 530 samples were examined. 

Sanitary Inspection. 

The sanitary inspection of the \Yachusett, Sudbury and Cochitu- 
ate watersheds has been continued during the year, under the direc- 
tion of William W. Locke, C.E., Sanitary Inspector. 

Upon the Wachusett watershed there have been 10 cases of typhoid 
fever in Holden, 3 in Princeton and 1 in "West Boylston. None of 
these cases were within the limits of the reservoir. The usual close 
watch has been kept over the camps and laborers employed within 
the limits of the reservoir, to see that the water supply was not pol- 
luted. The number of cases of typhoid fever upon the Sudbury and 
Cochituate watersheds was 20, divided as follows : Marlborough, 6 ; 
Framingham, 6; Westborough, 6; Southborough, 1; and Way- 
land, 1. 

A summary of the work of sanitary inspection for 1904 is given 
in the following four tables. The first table shows for the Wachu- 
sett watershed the number of premises inspected, the classification 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



125 



of cases inspected, and the condition of the premises at the end of 
the year ; the second table gives the corresponding information for 
the Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds ; the third table shows the 
improvements effected on the Wachusett watershed ; and the fourth 
table the improvements effected on the Sudbury and Cochituate 
watersheds. 

The headings of these tables explain themselves, except in a few 
instances: under the heading 4 ' Premises Vacant " are included all 
cases which at present furnish no objectionable drainage, but which 
might furnish such drainage if the premises were occupied ; under 
the heading ' ' Unsatisfactory " are included all cases where there 
may be, under the most unfavorable conditions, wash from privies or 
direct sink drainage, all suspected cases, and all cases of manufac- 
turing wastes entering feeders, even though there may be some 
attempt at previous purification. 

In the third and fourth tables no cases are entered as remedied 
unless complete sewer connections have been made, or all proba- 
bility of future contamination has been removed ; and no cases are 
entered as partly remedied except where positive improvement in 
the sanitary condition has been effected. 



Summary of Sanitary 


Inspections on the 


Wachusett 


Watershed in 1904. 




m 
















Condition 






Classification 


or Cases 


inspected 


t 


at End of 




a 

o> 
— 
















Year. 




bD 


SI) 


>j 


>> 








bD 






>> 


District. 


OJ 

& a 
a <e 


as 
"o 0> 

so aj 


s 

O 05 

Cn 


> 

a 
.5 A 


> 

P-l 60 

» 2 


bo 
jd cs 

a. 2 

5 £ 

(V 


JA 60 

a a 


■ 

Km 

p 
a 

OS 


a 

D • 

*-j go 

o o 

« IS 

<4-l X 


a 
a 
u 

00 

a 


o 

o 

eS 

S-l 


— 
o 
*j 
u 
cs 
«(-. 
as 

"3 
on 

a 




£ 


O 





Q 


i— i 


Q 


t— 1 


3 


a 


Ph 


0Q 





French Brook 


88 


36 








2 


6 


34 




6 


79 


9 


Muddy Brook, 






32 


11 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


20 


- 


2 


30 


2 


Grates Brook, 






138 


73 


3 


_ 


_ 


2 


9 


60 


_ 


3 


132 


6 


Maiden Brook, 






16 


8 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


13 


_ 


_ 


15 


1 


Chaffin Brook, 






146 


34 


1 


- 


4 


6 


31 


78 


i 


4 


130 


16 


Asnebumskit Brook, . 






270 


110 


11 


2 


4 


27 


26 


110 


3 


12 


232 


38 


Musquapoag, 






101 


22 


_ 


- 


4 


_ 


18 


58 


1 


12 


89 


12 


South Wachusett Brook, 






90 


17 


1 


- 


5 


1 


7 


43 


- 


8 


83 


7 


Trout Brook, 






49 


4 


1 


_ 


2 


_ 


4 


28 


1 


1 


47 


2 


East Wachusett Brock, 






212 


47 


1 


1 


7 


ft 


25 


112 


_ 


13 


198 


14 


Stillwater River, . 






170 


63 


3 


- 


4 


ft 


17 


74 


_ 


7 1 


163 


7 


Waushacurn, 






180 


53 


3 


3 


6 


19 


19 


67 


_ 


5 


152 


28 


French Hill, . 






38 


17 


1 


- 


- 


1 


3 


14 


- 


3 


36 


2 




1,530 


495 


25 f 


6 


36 


68 


170 


711 


6 


76 j 


1,386 


144 



* On some premises there are two or more cases. 

t In addition, ten cesspools and six privy vaults for temporary use were built at houses owned by the 
Board, which have been or will be ultimately torn down. 



L26 



METROPOLITAN WATEB 



[Pub. Doc. 



(Summary of Sanitary Inspections on the Sudbury and CochUuate Water 

sheds in 1904. 







00 



9 

£ 

* 

- y 

-= — 


Classification of Cases inspected. 


Condition 

at End of 

Ykah. 


DlSTKIi T. 


■5 o 
o ® 

» "V< 
90 fl) 

J 1 " 

o 


M 

3 

O o> 
D.i— 

So 

O 


>> 
> 


> 

0-. so 
es 

« 5 

a 
>— i 


6 

at 

* s 

V 

la 

5 


O 

* ttt 

a e! 

335 

_. p 

•5 

a 
I— t 


IS* 

£ 

V 

la 

P 

a 
es 

a 


60 

s 

3 . 
— a) 


•a 
a 

of 

y 

«, « 
0J> 
X 

1 
V 

u 
0. 


>• 
U 

o 

w 

es 

«t-C 

00 

'.£ 
es 
0Q 


o 

o 

es 

<u 
00 

oo 
3 
P 


Sudbury Watershed. 
Farm Pond, .... 
Framinuhain Reservoir No. ", 
Stony Brook, 
Angle Brook, 
Framingham reservoirs Nop. 

and 2, and Cold Spring Brook 
Eastern Sudbury, 
Indian Brook, 
Western Sudbury, 
Whitehall Reservoir, . 
Cedar Swamp, 

CochUuate Watershed. 
Snake Brook, 
Pegan Brook, 
Course Brook, 
Beaver Dam Brook, 
Dug Pond 




3 

7 

55 

304 

26 

37 
47 
22 
5 
54 

37 

93 

6 

116 

35 


2 

5 

41 

168 

17 

23 

20 

14 

3 

30 

23 
39 

4 
47 

5 

441 


3 
4 
4 

3 
1 

2 

6 
1 

1 


- 


2 
1 

1 


i 

19 

4 
1 

1 
3 

4 
3 


2 

3 

47 

6 

1 
14 
4 
1 
4 

9 
9 
1 
12 
7 


1 

8 
30 

2 

2 
3 

4 
2 
3 

4 
12 

1 
11 


3 

1 
1 

3 
4 


4 

18 

1 

9 
5 
6 

5 

4 
1 

7 


3 

5 

51 

244 
21 

35 
30 
16 
5 
49 

28 

82 

5 

103 

25 


o 

4 

60 

5 

2 

17 

. 6 

6 

9 
11 

1 
13 
10 


Totals 




847 


25 


- 


4 


36 


120 


83 


12 


59 


702 


145 



* Not including a large number of premises which were found on examination to be in a satisfactory 
sanitary condition, and likely to remain so. On some premises there are two or more cases. 



Sanitary Improvements effected on the Wachusett Watershed in 1904. 



District. 



Remedied 

by 

Filter-bed. 



Otherwise 
remedied. 



Partly 
remedied. 



French Brook, . 

Muddy Brook, . 

Gates Brook, 

Maiden Brook, . 

Cbaffin Brook. . 

Asnebumskit Brook, 

Musquapoag, 

South Wachusett Brook, 

Trout Brook, 

East Wachusett Brook, 

Stillwater River, 

Waushacum, 

French Hill, 

Totals, . 



14* 



17 



* One schoolhouse in Princeton removed to a safe location. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



127 



Sanitary Improvements effected on the Sudbury and Cochituate Watersheds 

in 1904. 



DlSTKICT. 



Remedied by 

Sewer 
Connection. 



Otherwise 
remedied. 



Partly 
remedied. 



Cesspools 
abandoned 

on Account of 
Sewer 

Connections. 



Sudbury Watershed. 

Farm Pond 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3, 

Stony Brook, 

Angle Brook, 

Framingham reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, and 

Cold Spring Brook. 
Eastern Sudbury 

Indian Brook, 

Western Sudbury, 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Cedar Swamp, 

Cochituate Watershed. 

Snake Brook, 

Pegan Brook, 

Course Brook 

Beaver Dam Brook, 

Dug Pond, 

Totals, 



35 



13 



36 



45 
15 



144 



25 



33 



13 



35 

44 
15 



140 



Among the cesspools dug on the Wachusett watershed during the 
year were two, each 10 feet in diameter and 10 feet deep, for large 
private sanatoriums in Rutland. As the soil was poor for filtration 
purposes, about 450 feet of 4-inch open-jointed tile pipe were laid 
near the surface from each cesspool, to receive the overflow. 

The work of making sewer connections in the various towns has 
not on the whole progressed quite as rapidly as during the preced- 
ing year. 

In Natick fixtures were installed and sewer connections made with 
51 houses, against 75 the preceding year. 

In South Framingham 45 houses have been connected with the 
sewer, against 56 the preceding year. 

In Marlborough there have been 35 connections, against 23 the 
preceding year. 



128 METROPOLITAN WATKK [Pub. Doc. 

In Westborough L3 connections have been made, against 10 the 
preceding year, — a total of 14 1 against 164 the preceding year. 

The sanitary conditions at Hopkinton still remain somewhat un- 
satisfactory. 

The Now York, New Haven c<: Hartford Railroad Company has 
double-tracked it- road from Framingham to Southborough this 
year, and, as the road for a portion of the distance crosses two of 
the reservoirs, special inspection has been necessary, to prevent the 
pollution of the water by the workmen. 

There are in places leaks into the Cochituate Aqueduct, where it 
is built in deep cuttings or in tunnel. By collecting samples of 
water from these leaks, and analyzing them, evidence was found of 
pollution which was traced to two houses in Newton. Temporary 
measures were taken to stop the pollution, and later in the year the 
city of Newton extended its sewerage system, and these houses were 
connected with it. 

A new sanitary census of the Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds 
was begun this year, similar to that taken in 1902 on the Wachusett 
watershed. This has been completed for the whole town of South- 
borough and portions of Natick and Ashland, and it is expected that 
it will be completed for the remainder of these watersheds in 1905. 

Drainage of Swamps. 

The ditches built to drain swamps on the Sudbury and Wachusett 
watersheds, having a total length of 27.4 miles, have required no 
special repairs during the year. The 15.55 miles of ditches tribu- 
tar} r to the open channel require about two-thirds of the time of 2 
men to maintain them in good condition. Special forces are also 
required at times to cut the bushes at the sides of the ditches. 

Observations of the color of water from Crane swamp and from 
the swamp southwest of Marlborough Junction before and after 
draining have been given in previous reports. For the year 1904 
the average colors have been respectively 99 and 71, which are 
somewhat lower than in most previous years. 

Distributing Reservoirs. 

The distributing reservoirs maintained by the Board are the 
Weston and Chestnut Hill reservoirs ; the AVaban Hill and Forbes 
Hill reservoirs and the Forbes Hill standpipe, of the southern high- 
service system ; Spot Pond and the Mystic Reservoir, near Tufts 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 129 

College, of the low-service system ; the Fells and Bear Hill reser- 
voirs, of the northern high-service system ; and the Arlington stand- 
pipe, of the northern extra high-service. sj^stem. 

Weston Reservoir. 
Since the completion of the Weston Reservoir, in the spring, the 
grounds about it have been kept in good order, the grass has been 
cut and the hay harvested. 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

In addition to the usual care of the o-ate-houses and grounds, re- 
pairs have been made at this reservoir as follows : the cover stones 
over the Cochituate Aqueduct, near the influent gate-house, have 
been reset, and the joints between the flagstones surrounding the 
influent and intermediate gate-houses have been repointed. At the 
old effluent gate-house the masonry of the steps was repointed. 
Three manholes on the surface water drain near the Lawrence Basin 
have been rebuilt. The ironwork in the terminal chamber of the 
Sudbury Aqueduct and in the small gate-house on the Cochituate 
Aqueduct near the high-service pumping station was cleaned and 
painted. Concrete steps have been built to replace wooden steps in 
front of the pumps used for drinking purposes. The walk on the 
reservoir embankment between the old effluent gate-house and a 
point near Reservoir Lane, a distance of 1,780 feet, has been re- 
surfaced, using ashes from the pumping station, with a very light 
sprinkling of stone dust on the surface. During the summer from 
2 to 4 men were required to police the grounds on Sundays, holi- 
days and evenings. 

Waban Hill Reservoir. 

The reservoir and gate-house are in good order, and the grass on 
the embankments was somewhat improved in appearance, as com- 
pared with the previous year. A fence 250 feet long, with wrought- 
iron posts set in concrete, and wrought-iron rails, was built to 
replace a fence with wooden posts which were decayed. This res- 
ervoir is cared for by the force employed at Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

Forbes Hill Reservoir and Standjpi/pe. 
Both the woodwork and ironwork of the tower and reservoir 
gate-chamber and the iron railing around the reservoir have been 
painted by the attendant permanently emploj^ed at the reservoir. 



130 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Cast-iron caps have been placed on the posts of the fence surround- 
ing the reservoir, to protect them from the weather. Observationa 
taken during the extreme cold weather of January and February 
showed that the thickness o[ ice which formed in the standpipe did 
not exceed 6 inches. 

tipot Pond. 
The pond has remained at or near high water during the year, 
except on four occasions. In .January and February the demand 
for water during the extremely cold weather caused the surface to be 
drawn down to about 1 foot below high water in each month. From 
( October 3 to 10 and October 24 to 31 water was drawn from the pond 
for the supply of the District, while the Sudbury Aqueduct was shut 
off for repairs. On each of these occasions the water fell to about 
1J- feet below high water. In addition to the ordinary care given 
to the reservoir and grounds about the pumping station, 356 cubic 
yards of sand and gravel and 75 cubic }~ards of loam have been 
placed on or above the shores of the pond near the corner of 
South and Main streets, where the embankment had settled so that 
the water was encroaching on the loamed area. The regular force 
employed, with some assistance from men detailed from other parts 
of the works, has devoted much time to the destruction of gypsy 
and brown-tail moths. The trees near the pumping station have 
been kept fairly clean, but the trees on about 50 acres of land at the 
southerly end of the pond were, at the end of the season, very badly 
infested with the eggs of gypsy moths. On November 7 the work 
of thinning out trees on the property of the Board around the pond 
was begun, for the purpose of improving the character of the wooded 
areas and of reducing the number of trees to be protected. At* 
the end of the year ()<) acres had been gone over, and about 300 
cords of wood cut and so treated as to kill the eggs on it. This 
work is to be continued, and the eggs of the moths on the uncut 
trees are to be destroyed before spring. During the year 109 prop- 
erty bounds were set around the pond. 

i Myst ic Reser vo ir . 
This reservoir has been in constant use, and is in good order ; but 
the gate-house will probably require a new roof during the coming 
year. The driveway has been thoroughly repaired by building new 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 131 

tar concrete gutters at a cost of $355, and by surfacing with 25 tons 

of broken stone. The tar concrete walk around the reservoir was 

also repaired. 

Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs. 

These reservoirs are cared for by the force employed at Spot 

Pond. The reservoirs, with their gate-houses and grounds, are in 

good order. 

Arlington Standpipe. 

The standpipe has been in service throughout the entire year. 
The two lower sheets of the standpipe have been painted, in order 
to obliterate marks made by visitors. 

> Mystic Lake. 

The water in the lake was kept from 2i to 3 feet below high water 
from the first of January until the middle of April. During the 
summer the water was kept about 1 foot below high water. In the 
early part of October, while work of repairing the dam was in 
progress, the water in the lake was lowered to about 3J feet below 
high-water mark, but was afterward raised, and' on January 1, 1905, 
stood at elevation 14.50 above Boston city base, or 2 J feet below 
high-water mark. An apron of Portland cement concrete, about 6 
feet wide and 2 feet thick, has been built below the outlet dam, to 
prevent the water falling over the dam from excavating the gravel 
and undermining the concrete foundations ; and the joints of the 
masonry piers and of the wingwalls have been repointed and grouted. 
The cost of the apron and pointing was about $370. 

The house occupied by the attendant has been reshingled and 

otherwise repaired, at a total cost of about $225. The house of the 

Medford Boat Club has been moved to a point about 100 feet west of 

its former location. 

Chelsea Reservoir. 

In June an arrangement was made with the Water Commissioners 
of Chelsea, by which the Board was given permission to draw water 
from the high-service reservoir in cases of emergency, for supplying 
other cities and towns in the Metropolitan District ; and in consid- 
eration of this privilege the Board agreed to make repairs to the 
lining of the reservoir, which had been badly cracked by the action 
of frost. This work was done in September by the maintenance 
department, at a cost of about $3,500. 



132 IVfETROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The reservoir ifl 177 feet long unci 96 foot wide, with semi-circular 
ends. The inner slopes were originally covered with 4-inch brick- 
work, laid on I inches of Rosen dale cement concrete. The oracks 
were in (he Lining on the upper portion of the slopes, not more than 
1 feet below high-water mark. The repairs consisted in removing 
the old lining down to a point about (> feet below the top of the em- 
bankment, and replacing it with a much heavier lining of Portland 
cement concrete. The new lining had a thickness of about 2 feet at 
the high-water line, decreasing to 9 inches at a point 4 feet below 
high water, where it joined the old lining. It was put on in two 
layers, with a coating of asphalt between. The upper layer was put 
on in blocks 5 feet wide and about 10 feet long, and the upper sur- 
face given a granolithic Hnish. 

Pipe Lines. 

No extensions were made during the year to the pipe lines owned 
and maintained by the department. Nineteen leaks were repaired 
on the pipes, at a cost of $1,579. Sixteen of these were caused by 
defective joints, one by the breaking of a valve and two by breaks 
in the mains. One of the last two occurred on February 25, when 
a 30-inch high-service force main broke on the grounds at Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir, near the low-service pumping station. This break 
was caused by the settling of the pipe in filled material. The second 
break occurred on October 16, when the 16-inch high-service main 
supplying Winthrop broke at the corner of Beach Street, in Win- 
throp Avenue, Revere. The cost of repairing the break in the 30- 
inch pipe, including the damage to grounds, was $626.45 ; and the 
cost of repairing the break in the 16-inch pipe, including $250 paid 
for damage to sewer construction, was $367.53. 

During October and the early part of November the 12-inch pipe 
line on Washington Street in Lynn, from a point 30 feet south of 
the north line of Suffolk Street to a point 180 feet south of the 
north line of Amity Street, a distance of 593 feet, was relaid, as it 
was very badly damaged by electrolytic action. This pipe was laid 
in ISDN. 

In July two insulating joints were set in the 48-inch pipe line 
crossing the Charles River between Boston and Cambridge, near 
the Boylston Street power station of the Boston Elevated Railway 
Company : and in December two additional joints were placed in 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 133 

the same pipe line, one on Massachusetts Avenue near the bridge 
over the Fitchburg Division of the Boston & Maine Railroad, and 
one near the Allston station on the Boston & Albany Railroad. 

The Ross pressure-regulating valves on the pipes supplying Win- 
throp and Swampscott, which did not satisfactorily regulate the 
pressure, have been replaced by valves designed in this office and 
built by the Waters Governor Company. 

The several pipe bridges have been examined, and the bridges 
over the Pines River were repainted. 

Twenty-two recording pressure gages are now in use, connected 
with the distribution system at different points. The average max- 
imum and minimum elevations of the water, due to the pressure at 
seventeen points in different parts of the District, are given in Ap- 
pendix No. 3, Table No. 38. 

Ventuki Meters. 

The number of meters in service in the Metropolitan Water Dis- 
trict on January 1, 1905, was 53, the same as on January 1, 1904. 
A few changes have, however, been made in the size and location of 
the meters. Two 48-inch meters supplying the low-service district 
of Boston, which were .located near the low-service pumping station 
at Chestnut Hill, were moved in April to a point on Beacon Street 
just below the connection between the new pipe from the Weston 
Aqueduct and the mains leading to Boston. This change was made 
in order to provide for accurate measurements of the water supplied 
to the Boston low-service district. 

A 10-inch meter on Broadway in Chelsea was moved from its 
location near the bridge leading to Charlestown to a point near 
William Street, and a 24-inch valve was set in the pipe line at the 
latter place. The old location near the Chelsea bridge was very 
near a sea wall, through which the cold entered, so that the meter 
could not be used during the winter. 

The 8-inch meter supplying the town of Nahant having been 
found to be too large to measure the minimum flow during the win- 
ter months, a ()-inch meter was set on the by-pass, and the meter 
register was connected in such a way as to measure the flow through 
either meter. A 10-inch weighted check valve was set on the main 
line of pipe, and so adjusted that it will open in case the meter at 
any time fails to furnish a sufficient supply. 



134 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Two men have devoted their entire time to the work of reading 
the meters, winding the registers, and cleaning, oiling, painting and 
repairing the registers and chambers. All of the chambers have 
been scraped and painted, the ironwork of the registers has been 
painted, and the bottom of the chambers covered with cement. 
Some trouble was experienced on account of freezing of the water 
in the registers and supply pipes during the extreme cold weather, 
and for the purpose of preventing this seven of the chambers were 
covered on the top and sides to a depth of 4 feet from the surface 
with an insulating coating composed of pitch and cork. The cost 
of this work was about s7o per chamber. 

Electrolysis. 

Investigations relative to the injury to the pipes caused by electric 
currents from the street railway systems have been continued through- 
out the year. In the annual report for the year 1903 detailed de- 
scriptions were given of the injury done to 48-inch pipes in Cam- 
bridge, the 24-inch pipes in Chelsea and 12-inch pipes in Lynn, and 
also of an experimental test of an insulating covering of asphalt and 
burlap which was being made by the Boston Elevated Railway Com- 
pany. On April 6 this covering, which was applied in November, 
1902, Avas removed from one length of 48-inch pipe for the purpose 
of examination. Before the covering was applied the pipe was care- 
fully cleaned and the pits dug out and located. Upon removing the 
covering many new pits were found, and in some cases one large pit 
was found where there were two or three separate pits before the 
covering was put on. The number of pits in the pipe had increased 
from NO in 1902 to 496 in 1904. 

The railway engineers suggested that possibly the pits were not 
all dug out before the pipe was covered, and therefore recovered it 
for a further test. They have since made the following experi- 
mental tests, which indicate that the covering has little if any value 
under some circumstances. 

A short piece of 4-inch pipe, covered in the same manner as the 
large pipe, was buried in dry earth in a box, and a cast-iron plate 
was buried 1.25 feet from the pipe. In one test tar was used in the 
covering, and in another asphaltum. The pipe and plate were con- 
nected in the regular trolley circuit of 500 volts. While the earth 
was dry the resistance between the pipe and the plate with the tar 
covering was 70o megohms, and with the asphaltum covering 34 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 135 

megohms. The earth was then saturated with salt water, and the 
resistance quickly diminished, and after seven to ten days disap- 
peared . 

For the purpose of diminishing the injury which was being done 
to the two lines of 36-inch pipe crossing under the Charles River 
near the power station of the Boston Elevated Railway Company in 
Cambridge, two 48-inch insulating joints were set in July, one on 
either side of the river. Each of these joints was composed of two 
flanged pieces of 48-inch pipe, bolted together with a gasket of pure 
rubber -J of an inch thick between the flanges. The bolts joining 
the flanges were covered with rubber tubing 1 of "an inch thick, and 
the nuts were insulated from the casting by means of a washer of 
rubber \ an inch thick. The joints have a resistance of from 100 to 
200 ohms when the pipe is filled with water, and are enclosed in 
water-proof chambers, to prevent the entrance of ground water. 

These joints reduce the quantity of electricity leaving the 36-inch 
pipes in the river from 25 amperes to less than 5 amperes, and re- 
duce the quantity flowing along the pipes toward the power station 
at a point on North Harvard Street near Franklin Street from 65 
amperes to 40 amperes. The joints were expected to protect the 
pipes in the river, at the expense, to some extent, of other portions 
of the pipe line ; and the measurements of currents appear to show 
that the effect has been substantially as expected, as the quantity of 
electricity leaving the pipe between Western Avenue, Brighton, and 
the river, was increased about 25 amperes. 

As these joints reduced the quantity of electricity flowing along 
the pipe line, the railway company desired to set similar joints at 
other points, and late in the year an arrangement was made for the 
setting of four additional 48-inch joints. Two of these were set in 
December, one at Porter's Square in Cambridge and the other near 
the Allston station on the Boston & Albany Railroad. Both of these 
joints are on the same line of 48- inch pipe as the two joints set in 
July, one being about 500 feet south and the other 7,500 feet north 
of the Charles River. 

As the amount of current flowing along the pipes at different 
times depends upon the amount of power developed at these times 
at the different power stations, many observations are necessary to 
determine the average quantity flowing even for a single day, and 
these have not been taken since the last joints were installed ; but 
enough measurements have been taken to warrant the statement that 



136 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

the introduction of the joint at Porter's Square has substantially 
stopped the How of electricity along the pipe at that point. The 
conditions have been ohanged so as to increase the amount of elec- 
tricity Leaving the pipe north of the joint, but there appears to be 
at present not more than tO amperes flowing along and leaving the 
pipe line, in place ot 90 amperes: and there has also been a very 
marked reduction in the difference of potential between the pipes 
and the rails of the street railway company. 

The measurements thus far taken appear to indicate that the 
effects of setting an insulating joint somewhere near the middle of a 
pipe line, one portion of which is electrically positive and another 
negative to tin 4 car tracks, are as follows • — 

1 . To stop the direct How of electricity along the pipe line at the 
point where the joint is set, and to reduce considerably the amount 
of electricity (lowing along other parts of the pipe line. 

'2. To lower the average potential of the pipe line on the negative 
or power station side of the joint. 

3. To raise the average potential of the pipe line on the positive 
side of the joint. 

1. To maintain a difference of potential of several volts between 
the positive and negative sides of the joint, and to produce condi- 
tions tending to increase electrolytic action at that point, unless the 
joint is carefully located in dry ground. 

5. To cause a new distribution of electrical conditions, under 
which the two sections of the pipe line become similar to the origi- 
nal line, with one portion of each positive and the other negative to 
the car tracks, so that the number of positive areas is increased by 
one for each joint. 

Both in August and November, 1903, the attention of the officials 
of the Boston & Northern Street Railway Company was called to 
the serious injury which had then been done to our pipes, both in 
Chelsea and Lynn, by the currents of electricity returning to its 
power stations. Excavations made in November in Lynn showed 
that there were pittings in the 12-inch pipe in Washington Street 
.45 of an inch in depth, leaving only .25 of an inch of the original 
thickness of iron. As it was not deemed prudent to continue to 
risk the failure of this pipe line, it was relaid during the past year 
for a length of 593 feet. All of this pipe was laid in 1898, and 
when removed it was badly decomposed, and in several places very 
little of the original metal of the pipe remained. The officials of the 



/•,:_/ 



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CO 

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O 

QC 

H 
O 

UJ 

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UJ 

> 

CO 

Q 

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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



137 



railway company were notified that the pipes were to be relaid be- 
fore the work was commenced, and were asked if they desired to 
adopt any preventive measures, but they did not do so ; and on De- 
cember 5, after the pipe was relaid, measurements showed that 
there were 20 amperes of electric current leaving the relaid section. 
It is probable that, if nothing is done to alter the conditions, it will 
be necessary to again relay these pipes not later than 1910. 

The regular annual survey to determine the relative electrical po- 
tential of the Metropolitan pipe lines and the street railway tracks, 
and the amount of electricity flowing on the pipes at the several 
gaging stations, was made in April. In making these surveys volt- 
meter readings were made at each station every twelve seconds, for 
a period of five minutes. The figures are obtained from readings 
taken between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. during the months of March and 
April, and do not represent the extreme results which would be 
obtained during the hours of maximum travel. The average of 
these readings, compared with similar readings made in 1903, are 
given in the following table. They show that the electrical press- 
ures have been generally reduced during the past year over the 
entire distribution system. 



Summary of Relative Potentials of Metropolitan Water Works Pipes and 
the Electric Car Tracks in the Metropolitan District for the Years 1903 
and 1904. 





Date. 


Pipe Negative. 


Pipe Positive. 


Location. 


a 
3 

-a 

M 
a 
<v 


DIFFERENCE 

OF POTENTIAL 

(VOLTS). 


. © 

a 

3 

.5 

a 

a> 
►J 


DIFFERENCE 

OF POTENTIAL 

(VOLTS). 


a 
a 

es 
2 


M 

03 
!h 

> 

< 


a 

p 
a 

"3 


i 6 

i 1? 

1-1 Si 
OS > 


a 

p 
a 

a 

s 


Low-service Pipe Lines. 

Easterly 48-inch line, Chestnut Hill Reser- 
voir to Spot Pond, via Maiden. 

Change during year, 

Westerly 48-inch line, Chestnut Hill Reser- 
voir to Spot Pond, via Medford. 

42-inch line, Maiden to Chelsea, . 

Change during year, 

i 

Low-service main, Soroerville to Arlington, 

Change during year, 


1 1903 
I 1904 

J 1903 
\ 1904 

( 1903 
\ 1904 

( 1903 
\ 1904 


31,500 
28,150 

17,000 
18,400 

12,700 
12,300 

27,250 
24,350 


7.8 
6.4 

—1.4 

6.1 
5.2 

— .9 

6.5 
6.2 

— .3 

4.3 
5.0 

+ .7 


4.00 
3.97 

— .03 

2.45 
1.81 

— .64 

3.55 
2.81 

— .74 

1.60 
.76 

— .84 


— .6 
.4 

— 2 

.3 

— .8 

+ .5 

2.5 
1.4 

—1.1 

— .6 
—1.2 

+ .6 


14,000 
17,350 

15,700 
14,300 

2,600 
3,000 

2,900 


5.1 
2.6 

—2.5 

9.0 

8.8 

— .2 

3.6 
3.6 

2.1 


1.60 
1.23 

—.37 

4.00 
3.63 

— .37 

1.09 
1.07 

— .02 

.65 


—1.6 

—.6 

—1.0 

.6 

— .3 

— .3 

1.0 

1.0 

.0 



138 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Summary of Relative Potentials of Metropolitan Water Works Pipes and 
the Electric Car Tracks in the Metropolitan District for the Years 1903 
and 1904 — Concluded. 



Location. 



Supply Pi/" Lin 

Terminal Chamber of Weeton Aqueduct 
to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

Chun fro liming year, 

Northern Hlgh-servia Pipe Lines. 
Medford to Revere, 

Change during year, 

Revere to Lynn, . 

Change during year, . 

Spot Pond to Stoneham, 

Change during year, . 

thern High-service Pipe Lines. 
Belmont and Watertown to Quincy, . 

Change during year, 

Southern Extra High-service Pipe Lines. 
Weet Street, Hyde Park, .... 

Change during year, 



Date. 



1903 
1904 



1903 
1904 



1903 
1904 



1903 
1904 



1903 
1904 



1903 
1904 



1'iit Negative. 



a 

3 

61) 

a 



Dll'KKKRNCE 

OP POTENTIAL 

VOLTS). 



SB 



13,400 
14,800 



48,700 
47,900 



23,850 
28,850 



60,750 
61,250 



4.0 
5.0 

+1.0 



10.5 
5.0 

—5.5 

3.4 
3.0 

— .4 



35.0 
60.0 

+25.0 



.56-1.5 
—1.3 



1.17 

+ .61 



2.85 
1.56 

—1.29 

1.92 
.82 

—1.10 



3.80 
3.63 

-.17 



— .2 



— .4 
—1.0 

+ .6 

-1.2 

— .6 

—.6 



.e 



PIPE Positive. 



20,800 
19,400 



5,900 
6,700 



9,550 
4,550 



10,250 
10,250 



2,500 
— 1.8 2,000 

+1.2 



1,550 
1,550 



DIFFERENCE 

OP POTENTIAL 

(VOLTS). 



a 



10.0 
8.4 

—1.6 



2.6 
1.8 

—.8 

10.4 
8.8 

—1.6 

27.0 
21.0 

—6.0 



2.3 
1.2 

-1.1 



17.5 
13.0 

-4.5 



2.82 
2.91 

+ .09 



.74 
.47 

— .27 

2.59 
3.67* 

+1.08 

19.40 
12.22 

—7.18 



.84 
.44 

— .40 



10.35 
7.51 

-2.84 



.0 
—1.0 

+1.0 



-1.5 
—1.1 

— .4 

—2.4 
1.1 

— 1.8 

12.0 
3.0 

-9.0 



.7 
.1 

— .6 



5.2 
3.0 

-2.2 



* This average is high on account of reduced length of the district in 1904; the average for the same 
length in 1903 was 4.93. 

At a few points, however, the conditions are worse than in 1903. 
At the corner of Reservoir Lane and Boylston Street in Brookline 
the voltage between the pipe and the rails has increased from 2|- to 
, r > volts, possibly due to increased traffic on the Boston c£ Worcester 
line On Adams Street in Milton, near the East Milton station, the 
average voltage has increased from 18 volts in 1903 to 22 volts in 
1904, and the maximum from 35 to 60 volts. This is due to poor 
track construction, and lack of return feeders on the Old Colony 
Street Railway Company's tracks. Early in the year the Boston 
tV Northern Street Railway Company was notified that there was a 
large difference of potential between our pipes and their tracks on 
Main Street in Stoneham, and that a large quantity of electricity 
was flowing along our pipe. During the past year the railway 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



139 



company has relaid the tracks between Melrose Highlands and 
Stoneham Square, and provided better returns for the current, so 
that the conditions have been greatly improved ; but even now there 
is considerable current flowing along our pipe in Main Street. 

In January the attention of the Old Colony Street Railway Com- 
pany was called to the fact that a current of from 15 to 45 amperes 
had been measured flowing on our 12-inch pipe in West Street in 
Hyde Park, with differences of from 5 to 18 volts between the pipe 
and the rails. In June our pipe was uncovered at several points 
for examination, and pits about -Jg- of an inch in depth were found 
on several pipes. A service pipe of the Hyde Park Water Company 
w T as found to be resting upon the 12-inch pipe, making an electric 
contact by means of which about 10 amperes of electricity passed 
from the Metropolitan main to the pipes of the Hyde Park Water 
Company. By raising the service pipe and breaking the electric 
connection, the flow of electricity along our pipes was reduced about 

one-half. 

Clinton Sewerage. 

The Clinton sewage disposal works were in daily operation dur- 
ing the whole year. The amount of sewage pumped and filtered 
was about 43,000 gallons per day less than during the preceding 
year, notwithstanding the considerable number of additional house 
connections which have been made with the system. The decrease 
is due in part to the smaller quantity of water leaking into a very 
leaky section of the town sewer, located close to the river, between 
the Lancaster Mills and Germantown, and to the large increase in 
the number of water meters in Clinton, by which the waste of water 
is checked. 

Following are statistics relating to the operation of the pumping 
station : — 



Daily average quantity of sewage pumped (gallons), 
Daily average quantity of coal consumed (pounds), 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 
Number of days pumping, 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Repairs and supplies, .... 

Total for station, .... 

Cost per million gallons pumped, . 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



740,000 

1,295 

570 

366 

M,389 33 

1,092 18 

756 91 

<3,238 42 

$11 99 
26 



140 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The inorease in the cost of labor, as compared with the cost the 
preceding year, is due mainly to the employment of an additional 
engineer to operate the pump nights during the spring when the 
quantity of sewage was large. The Increase in the cost of repairs 
and supplies is due mainly to the purchase of new plungers for the 
pump and the repair of the old plungers lor future use, these Items 
costing So -Jl). 

Filter-beds, 

During the year 8 settling basins and about .83 of an acre of small 
filter-beds on which to filter the water from the underdrains of the 
settling basins were added, as already described in the portion of 
the report relating to Construction. 

In the latter part of the } r ear from 2 to 3 inches of the dirty sand 
or gravel were removed from the surfaces of the 11) beds from which 
all soil had been removed when they were built. The total quantity 
of material removed Avas 5,444 cubic yards, which was hauled an 
average distance of 540 feet to dispose of it. The total cost of re- 
moving the material and disposing of it w r as $1,858.19, or 34 cents 
per cubic yard. This work was done by a day-labor force. 

The settling basins have been in operation continuously since No- 
vember 14. The sewage is allowed to run through a basin for a 
time, when it is shut oft and turned through another. After a week's 
use, sludge about 6 inches deep accumulates on the bottom of the 
basin near the inlet, but near the outlet there is very little. These 
basins have been used for too short a time to warrant any statement 
as to the best method of using them or as to their effect. 

I )uring the warmer part of the year sewage was applied in about 
the same quantity per bed to the 19 beds from which all soil had 
been removed and to the 6 beds from which soil had not been re- 
moved : but the latter beds were not used during the colder part of 
the year. 

In March, April and May the sewage was pumped nights as well 
as days, and for nearly a week the pump was operated continuously. 

During the warmer portion of the year, from April 8 to Novem- 
ber 27, the sewage was applied to the beds at a rate which averaged 
about 32,000 gallons per acre per day. For the first half hour after 
beginning pumping in the morning, when the sewage contains more 
sludge than at other times, it was turned on one of two selected 
beds. These 2 beds were used alternately for periods of about 3 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



141 



weeks, one being in use while the other was drying and being 
cleaned. The remaining 23 beds were used in rotation, and all the 
sewage was run upon a single bed, having an area of a little less 
than 1 acre, for about 1^ hours, the amount per application being 
about 181,000 gallons, each bed being used about once in 6 days. 

During the colder portion of the year, when the temperature was 
below 15° above zero, all the sewage of one day's pumping was 
turned upon one of 5 improved beds, which had been prepared with 
furrows 3 feet 6 inches apart. The average amount per application 
was 580,000 gallons, and each furrowed bed was used about once in 
10 days. When the temperature was higher than 15° above zero, 
the sewage was applied to the beds which had not been furrowed, at 
the rate of 290,000 gallons per application, and each acre was used 
about once in 10 days. 

The degree of purification was about the same as in the preceding 
year. Taking the year as a whole, the amount of nitrification has 
been about the same as in the preceding year, but much lower than 
in the years 1900 to 1902. It was much higher in the last half of 
the year than in the first. The results of chemical analyses of the 
sewage and effluent are given in the following table : — 



[Parte per 100,000.] 





1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


January to 
June, 1904, 


July to 
December, 

1904, 
inclusive. 


Whole 
Year, 












inclusive. 


1904. 


Albuminoid ammonia, sewage, . 


1.380 


1.0025 


1.0517 


.9233 


.7467 


.8467 


.7967 


Albuminoid ammonia, effluent, . 


.089 


.0741 


.0891 


.0782 


.0752 


.0620 


.0686 


Percent removed, . . 


94 


91 


89 


92 


90 


93 


91 


Oxygen consumed, sewage, 


14.84 


10.73 


8.85 


8.65 


6.72 


10.42 . 


8.57 


Oxygen consumed, effluent, 


1.09 


.82 


1.15 


1.12 


1.07 


.91 


.99 


Per cent, removed, 


93 


91 


84, 


87 


84 


91 


88 


Free ammonia, sewage, 


3.9500 


3.4533 


4.3284 


3.8292 


3.26 


4.67 


3.97 


Free ammonia, effluent, 


1.0631 


.5792 


.6862 


1.0185 


•1.08 


.89 


.99 


Per cent, removed, . . . 


73 


83 


84 


73 


67 


81 


75 


Nitrogen as nitrates, effluent, , . 


.7300 


.9298 


.9815 


.4168 


.2129 


.5963 


.4046 



The cost of maintaining the filter-beds, exclusive of the cost of 
removing the dirty sand or gravel from the 19 beds, has been as 
follows : — 



Labor $2,198 16 

Repairs and supplies, 42 15 



Total, .... 
Cost per million gallons filtered, 



!,240 31 
8 29 



14-J MKTKOPOLITAX WATER [Pub. Doc 

Appended to this report are tables of contracts giving the amount 
of work dour and other Information, a statement of the cement tests, 
a long series o\' tables relating to the maintenance of the Metropol- 
itan Water Works, tables showing the Length of main pipes and 
number of ser^ ice pipes, meters and lire hydrants in the Metropolitan 
Water District, and a summary of statistics for 1904. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Boston, January 1, 1905. 



FREDERIC 1\ STKARNS, 

Chief Engineer. 



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Division Line between North and South Metropolitan Districts indicated thus... 

Limit of Metropolitan Sewerage District indicated thus 

Completed Metropolitan Sewers indicated thus 

Proposed Force Mains connecting with High Level Sewer indicated thus. 
Boston Main Drainage Sewers indicated thus ~. 



Areas Sewered by Combined System and Contributing 

Sewage to Metropolitan Sewers to Date shaded thus. 



Areas Sewered by Separate System and Contributing 
Sewage to Metropolitan Sewers to Date shaded thus. 



AREAS OF SELWI 

North Metropolitan area. 
South Metropolitan area. 

Total Area Including Wat 



Elevations are referred tc 
below mean low water of 
below boston city base 



5- COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MRQ POIM WATER HP SEWERAGE B OARD 
-map B^irywmo 




RE AS OF SEWERAGE DISTRICT 

=?OPOLITAN AREA _._.9I S©. MlLES 

F?OPOLITAN AREA 102 SQ. MILES 



j:a Including Water Surfaces 193 Sq. Miles 



NOTE 

ARE REFERRED TO A DATUM WHICH IS IOOj§§ FT. 
EAN LOW WATER OF BOSTON HARBOR AND IOO FT. 
OSTON CITY BASE 



SEW ERAGE DISTR ICT 

January 1, 1905 



Vt 



SCALE OF MILES 

I 



SCALE OF METERS 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



143 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF SEWERAGE WORKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen : — The following is a report of the operations of the 
Engineering Department of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works for 
the year ending December 31, 1904. 

Organization. 

» 

The engineering organization during the year has been as fol- 
lows : — 



Division Engineers : — 
Frederick D. Smith, 



Frank I. Capen, 



Frank A. Emery, 



In charge of maintenance, South Metropolitan. 
System, and construction of High-level Sewer 
in Quincy. 

In charge of construction of High-level Sewer in 
Roxbury, and of maintenance and construction. 
North Metropolitan System. 

In charge of office, drafting room and records. 



In addition to the above, there were employed at the end of the 
year 8 engineering and other assistants. 



11 -I 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doe. 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICTS. 

Areas and Populations. 
During the year qo changes have been made in the extent of the 
sewerage districts. The area of the North Metropolitan District re- 
mains .-it 91 square miles, and of the South Metropolitan District at 
102 square miles, — a total, inclusive of water surfaces, of 193 square 
miles. These districts include the whole or parts of 25 cities and 
towns, as set forth in the following table : — 

Table showhig Areas and Estimated! Populations within the Metropolitan 
Seiverage District, as of December 31, 1904. 



City or Town. 



Area (Square 
Miles). 



Estimated Popu- 
lation. 



=>2 

O 



Arlington, . 

Belmont, 

Boston (portions of), 

Cambridge, . 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Lexington,* . 

Maiden, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Revere, 

Somerville, . 

Stoneham, . 

Wakefield, . 

Winchester, 

Winthrop, . 

Woburn, 



= 2 



'Boston (portions of), 

Brookline, . 

Dedham,* 

Hyde Park, . 
( Milton, . 

Newton, 

Quincy, 

Waltham, . 
[ Watertown, . 



5.20 

4.66 
3.45 
6.11 
•2.24 
3.34 
5.11 
5.07 
8.35 
3.73 
5.86 
3.96 
5.50 
7.65 
5.95 
1.61 
12.71 



Totale, 



20.92 

6.81 

9.40 

4.57 

12.59 

18.03 

12.56 

13.63 

4.04 



90.50 



102.55 
193.05 



10,400 

5,200 

91,400 

102,200 

38,400 

30,100 

2,800 

42,000 

22,700 

14,700 

13,900 

71,700 

6,500 

10,500 

8,600 

8,000 

15,400 



494,500 



155,800 
25,100 

7,400 
14,700 

7,900 
39,900 
28,400 
27,600 
11,500 



318,300 
812,800 



* Part of town. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



145 



METROPOLITAN SEWERS. 

Sewers Purchased and Constructed and their Connections. 

Within the Sewerage Districts there are now 95.55 miles of Met- 
ropolitan sewers. Of this total, 8.79 miles of sewers, with the 
Quincy pumping station, have been purchased from cities and towns 
of the districts, the remaining 87 miles of Metropolitan sewers hav- 
ing been constructed by the Metropolitan boards. 

The position, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the 
following tables, together with other data referring to the public 
and special connections with the system : — 

North Metropolitan System. 



City or Town. 



Boston : — 
Deer Island, 
East Boston, 

Charlestown, 

Winthrop, 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Maiden, 

Melrose, 
Cambridge, 

Somerville, 

Medford, 

Winchester, 

Stoneham, . 
Woburn, 
Arlington, . 
Belmont, § , 
Wakeficld,§ 
Revere, 



Size of Sewers. 



6' 3" to 9', . 
9' to 1', 

6' 7"X7'6" to 1', 

9',. 



8'4"X9'2"to 1'10"X2'4", 

8' 2"X8' 10" to 4' 8"X5' 1", 

3' 9"X4' 1" to 1' 3", . 

1' 10"X"2' 9" to 10", . 
5'2"X5'9" to 1'3", . 

6' 5"X7' 2" to 1' 10"X2' 3", 

4'8"X5' 1" to 10", 

2' 11"X3' 3" to 1' 3", . 

1' 3" to 10", . 

1' 10"X2' 4" to 1' 3", . 

1' 6" to 10", . 



4' to 3', 



a 






J=oS 



1.367 

5.467 

3.292 
2.864 



5.123 

2.925 

3.931* 

6.099t 
7.167 

3.471 

5.359 

6.428 

.010 
.933 

3.520J 



.048 
58.004|| 



4 
18 

13 

7 

r 



25 

31 

28 

10 < 
20 

12 

4 

3 
33 
3 
1 
1 

226 



Special Connections. 



Character or Location of 
Connection. 



Number 

in 
Opera- 
tion. 



Navy Yard, . 

Almshouse, . 

Club house, . 

Bakery, 

Rendering works, 

Metropolitan Water W'orks 

blow-off, . 
Metropolitan Water Works 

blow-off, . 
Metropolitan Water Works 

blow-off, . 
Private houses, . 
Private houses, . 
Slaughter-house, 
City Hospital, 
Tannery, 

Slaughter-houses (3), 
Car-house, . 
Stable, . . . 
Armory building, 
Private houses, . 
Stable, .... 
Tannery, 
Private houses, . 
Gelatine factory, 

Glue factory, 
Private houses, . 



1 
105 
100 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
5 
1 
2 
2 
1 

1 

92 



330 



* Includes .988 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden, 
t Includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Melrose. 
X Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 

§ The Metropolitan sewer extends but a few feet into the towns of Belmont and Wakefield. 
|| Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic River valley sewer in Medford, Winchester and Woburn, running 
parallel with the Metropolitan sewer. 



146 



MKTKOPOUT.W WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



>So*ith Metropolitan System, 



I'll \ OR Toti N. 



size of Sewers. 



Boston (Buck Buy), 

Boston (Brighton), 
Boston (Dorohes- 

Boston (Uoxbury), 

Boston (West Rox- 
bnry). 

Brookline, 
Dedham, . 

Hull, 

Hyde Park, 
Milton, . 
Newton, . 
Quincv, . 
Wall him, 
Watertown, 



6' C" to 5' 6", 

5' 6" to 12", . 
3'X4' to 2' 6"x2'7", 

6' 6"X7', 4' 0", . 
9' 3" X 10' 2" to 12", 



5' 6", . 

4'X4' I"to3'9"x3'10" 

60" pipe, 

10'7"XU'7"to4'x4'l" 

H'Xl2'to8", 

4'2"X4'9" to i'3", 

11' 3"X 12' 6" to 60" pipe 

3'6"X4', 

4'2"X4'9" to 12", 



1 . 500* 

3.714f 
2.870} 

1.430 
7.011 



0.127 
2.350 
0.750 
4.527 
3.600 
2.911 
6.007 
0.001 
0.750§ 

37.548 









□ Q> 



O 



Special Connections. 



<-> m CO 

3 S »■ 
Pm 



< Ibaraoter or Location of 
< 'onncction. 



11 
6 



2 

4 

13 

7 
6 
3 
1 
5 

72 



Number 

in 

Opera 

lion 



Private house, 

Administration building, 

Bocton Turk Department, . 

Simmons College buildings, . 

Abattoir, 



Parental school, 

Lutheran Evangelical Church, 



Private buildings, 
Private houses, 



Factory, 



2 
2 

2 

17 



* Includes .355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

t Includes .026 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

X Includes 1.24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

§ Includes .025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

Cost of Construction. 
The cost of the 95 miles of Metropolitan sewers enumerated above, 
including seven stations, siphons and appertaining structures, may 
be summarized as follows : — * 



North Metropolitan System, 
South Metropolitan S} T stem, 



$6,086,569 91 
7,580,262 47 

$13,666,832 38 



Construction and Additions during the Year. 
The last report indicated that 93.86 miles of Metropolitan sewers 
had been constructed to December 31, 1903. There has conse- 
quently been added, during the year under review, a length of 1.69 
miles. This includes 0.48 of a mile of High-level Sewer, authorized 
by chapter 424 of the Acts of 1899 ; 0.939 of a mile of sewer, author- 
ized by chapter 242 of the Acts of 1903, to provide sewerage facilities 
for the town of Kevere ; 0.248 of a mile of sewer, authorized by chap- 
ter 336 of the Acts of 1903, to provide an additional outlet for the 



* For detailed statement of cost, see report of Board, p. 52. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



147 



sewage of Belmont ; and 0.025 of a mile of sewer in Lake Street, 
Winchester, — all referred to in detail later in this report. 

The following table gives details of areas, populations, local sewer 
mileage and other data for the whole Metropolitan Sewerage Sys- 
tem : — 

North Metropolitan System. 



Area 
(Square 


Estimated 

Total 
Population. 


Miles of 

Local Sewer 

connected. 


Estimated 

Population 

contributing 

Sewage. 


Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 
Population 
(Per Cent.). 


Connections made 
with Metro- 
politan Sewers. 


Miles). 


Public. 


Special. 


90.50 


494,500 


558.18 


387,327 


78.3 


226 


330 



South Metropolitan System. 



102.55 



318,300 



406.32 



147,761 



46.4 



72 



17 



Entire Metropolitan District. 



193.05 



812,800 



964.50 



535,088 



65.8 



298 



347 



Of the estimated gross population of 812,800 on December 31, 
1904, 535,088, representing 65.8 per cent., were on that date con- 
tributing sewage to the Metropolitan sewers, through a total length 
of 964.5 miles of local sewers owned by the individual municipalities. 
These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan system by 298 
public and 347 special connections. It appears, also, that there has 
been during the year an increase of 30.4 miles of local sewers con- 
nected with Metropolitan systems, and that 24 public and 8 special 
connections have been added. 

Pumping Stations and Pumpage. 

The following table shows the average daily volume of sewage lifted 
at each of the six Metropolitan pumping stations during the year, as 
compared with corresponding volumes for the previous year : — 



Pumping Station. 



Average Daily Pumpage. 



Jan. 1, 1903 

to 
Dec. 31, 1903. 



Jan. I, 1904 

to 
Dec. 31, 1904. 



Increase during 
the Year. 



Deer Island 

East Boston, 

Charlestown, 

Alewife Brook, 

Quincy, 

Ward Street (from Oct. 14 to Dec. 31, 1904), 



Gallons. 
53,800,000 
51,600,000 
29,900,000 
3,831,000 
3,042,000 



Gallons. 
57,200,000 
55,00u,000 
31,100,000 
3,546,000 
3,651,000 
12,700,000 



Gallons. 
3,400,000 
3,400,000 
1,200,000 
285,000* 
609,000 



Per Cent, 
6.3 
6.6 
4.0 

7.4* 
20.0 



* Decrease. 



148 METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 



CONSTRUCTION ON THE NORTH METROPOLITAN 

SYSTEM. 

With the completion of the branch sewer to the town of Revere 
and extension of the Cambridge branch to Belmont, begun in L903, 
all Metropolitan sewers on this system authorized to date have been 
constructed. The Revere extension was opened for service on 
October 8, and the Belmont extension on July 20, 1904. 

Details of the 4 construction are given in the following report. 

Extension to Revere. 

Section 61, Chelsea (Construction in Part by Day Labor, in Part 

by Contract). 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 

Superintendent of Construction by Day Labor. — Henry J. Wright. 

Contractor for Tunnel Work. — Charles A. Haskin, Boston, Mass. 

This section comprises 2,580 linear feet of 54-inch brick sewer 
and 999 linear feet of 48-inch brick sewer built in open cut, and 608 
linear feet of 54-inch brick sewer built in tunnel. 

It joins Section 10 of the North Metropolitan trunk sewer near 
the junction of Eastern Avenue and Marginal Street, Chelsea, and 
extends northerly along Eastern iVvenue and across the land of the 
Boston & Maine Railroad to Crescent Avenue, crossing under the 
tracks of the Grand Junction branch of the Boston & Albany Kail- 
road, the tidal inlet known as Bass Creek, the Willoughby Street 
main sewer of the city of Chelsea, and the tracks of the Eastern 
Division of the Boston & Maine Railroad. 

At the beginning of the year construction by day work was 
already in progress, as described in the last report, and about 345 
linear feet of 48-inch sewer northerly from the Eastern Division of 
the Boston & Maine Railroad and 600 linear feet of 54-inch sewer 
southerly from Bass Creek had been built. This construction was 
continued at an average rate of (50 linear feet a week until the 
remaining 2,584 feet of open cut was completed on October 12, 
1904. This included portions between the Eastern Division of the 
Boston & Maine Railroad and Bass Creek, and a length from 600 feet 
south of Bass Creek to within 608 feet of the end of the section at 
Marginal Street. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 149 

As the construction in open cut approached Marginal Street, 
quicksand was encountered in the excavation. During the construc- 
tion of sections 10 and 12 of the North Metropolitan trunk sewer in 
Marginal Street in 1892-94, difficulties with boiling quicksand 
occasioned serious delay and expense in the excavation. To avoid 
similar delay and expense on this work, a contract was arranged on 
May 3, 1904, with an expert in compressed air construction, and 
the work for a length of 608 feet north from Marginal Street was 
carried out by the pneumatic process in tunnel, under an air pres- 
sure of 10 pounds per square inch in excess of that of the atmos- 
phere. 

The tunnel heading was in fine silt, making it necessary to sup- 
port the masonry on piling. Piles, in bents of three, about four 
feet on centres, were driven in advance of the tunnel heading, which 
was excavated over the top of the piling, and the pile caps, platform 
and masonry placed in position under compressed air. The masonry 
cross-section built was similar to that used in the open cut construc- 
tion. The work was begun on May 26, and an average rate of 
progress of 65 feet a week was maintained until its completion on 
August 11, 1904. 

Section 62, Chelsea ( Construction in Part by Day Labor, in Part 

by Contract) . 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 

Superintendent of Construction by Day Labor. — Henry J. Wright. 

Contractor for Tunnel Work. — Charles A. Haskin, Boston, Mass. 

This section comprises 2,788 linear feet of 48-inch brick sewer, 
1,320 feet in tunnel and 1,468 feet in open cut, beginning on Cres- 
cent Avenue, at Eastern Avenue, and running northeasterly across 
marsh land on the line of Crescent Avenue extended and through 
Crescent Avenue and its extension to near the tidal inlet, known as 
Mill Creek, separating Chelsea and Revere. 

The construction was fully described in the last report. At the 
beginning of the year about 540 linear feet in tunnel and about 639 
linear feet in open cut had been completed. The work was con- 
tinued at an average rate of progress of 60 feet a week in open cut 
and 70 feet in tunnel until its completion on April 1, 1904. 



150 METROPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 

Mill Greek Grossing^ Ghelsea and Revere {Construction by Day 

Labor), 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 

Superinti <>>/• .if of Construction by Day Labor. — Henry J. Wright. 

This work was fully described in the last report. It covers a total 
length of 387 Linear feet. The work of construction was continued 
by the methods outlined in the report until its completion early in 
June. All piles driven for supporting the coffer-dam were either 
cut oil' or pulled, Leaving the waterway of Mill Creek unobstructed. 

Extension to Belmont. 

Section 63, Cambridge. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 
Contractor. — Gow & Palmer, Boston, Mass. 

This section begins on Mt. Auburn Street at Lowell Street, at 
the end of Section 30 of the Cambridge branch of the Metropolitan 
-ewer, constructed in 1893, and extends westerly along Mt. Auburn 
Street to Aberdeen Avenue ; thence in Aberdeen Avenue and private 
land, across Homer Avenue, through private land, and across the 
Watertown branch of the Boston & Maine Railroad to Holworthy 
Place : through Holworthy Place, Holworthy Street and private 
land, across Cashing Street and through Cushinor Avenue to the 
Belmont town line. 

The construction of this section was fully described in the last 
report. It comprises 4,780 linear feet of 24-inch by 28-inch and 
1,031 linear feet of 22-inch by 28-inch brick sewer in open cut, and 
about 547 linear feet of 25-inch diameter brick sewer in tunnel. At 
the beginning of the year about 5,100 linear feet had been com- 
pleted. 

The opening on Mt. Auburn Street at Lowell Street, started on 
September 17, 1903, was continued until the masonry was com- 
pleted on March 16, 1904, and the trench partially backfilled ; but 
the remainder of the backfilling was postponed until late in March, 
when the frost had left the ground. 

The tunnel headings, started in December, 1903, were continued 
until they were completed on March 5, 1904. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 151 



CONSTRUCTION ON THE SOUTH METROPOLITAN 

SYSTEM. 

During the year the High-level Sewer, authorized by chapter 424 
of the Acts of 1899 and fully described in earlier reports, has been 
practically completed and put into operation. 

At the date of the last report some of the outfall pipes on Section 
43 remained to be placed in the harbor. On Nut Island, Section 
44, the screen-house and machinery were to be erected, and some 
filling and grading on the island and the near-by embankments of 
Section 48 remained to be finished. The connecting chamber at 
the end of the force-main lines, Section 76, at Parker Hill in Rox- 
bury, remained to be completed, and the Ward Street pumping en- 
gines and other machinery to be erected. 

The greater part of this work was completed early in the fall, and 
the pumps at the Ward Street pumping station were started on Oc- 
tober 14, since which date the sewage from that portion of the 
Charles River valley above Vancouver Street, in the Back Bay dis- 
trict of Boston, has been pumped to the High-level Sewer. 

This Metropolitan district above Vancouver Street includes most 
of Brookline, Newton and the Roxbury district of Boston, and the 
whole of Brighton, Waltham and Watertown. A connection for 
territory below Vancouver Street leading easterly along Huntington 
Avenue toward Gainsborough Street, to provide for the sewage of a 
portion of the Back Bay and Roxbury districts of the city of Bos- 
ton, remains to be completed. The details of this connection are 
under discussion with the Charles River Basin Commission and the 
Sewer Department of the city of Boston. Until this branch is built, 
the sewage of this small district below Vancouver Street will con- 
tinue to be pumped by the Boston Main Drainage Works. 

On November 22, 1904, the Neponset River valley Metropolitan 
main sewer was connected with the High-level Sewer at the junction 
of East River and Monponsett streets, in Hyde Park ; and since that 
date the sewage from Metropolitan territory above this point, in- 
cluding the whole of Hyde Park, Dedham, the West Roxbury dis- 
trict of Boston and part of the town of Brookline, has been disposed 
of through the High-level Sewer. 



152 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The trunk sewer through Quincy and Milton was opened for ser- 
vice on < totober I 1. 1 90 L 

Sewage from the Neponset valley Metropolitan area below Hyde 
Park, including small portions of Dorchester and Milton, will con- 
tinue to be discharged through the Boston Main Drainage Works. 
Sewage from the Quincy pumping station, at present pumped to 
the Moon Island outlet at Squantum, will he delivered to the High 
level Sewer through 2 1-inch force-main pipes to be laid during the 
coming spring. 

A detailed description of the work of the year follows. 

Serf ion 43) Quincy and Hull . 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frederick D. Smith. 

Contractor. — Hirain W. Phillips, Quincy, Mass. (Two contracts.) 

The section comprises two lines of 60-inch cast-iron outfall pipes. 
placed below the bed of Boston harbor, extending northerly from 
Nut Island to west of Peddocks Island. The two lines have an 
aggregate length of 10,844 feet. 

At the beginning of the year 4,569 feet remained to be placed on 
the easterly line, and considerable backfilling on both lines. The 
contractor commenced operations for the season about May 1, and 
the contract work Avas completed on November 2, 1904. The 
method of placing the pipes has been fully described in earlier 
reports. 

During the year the pipe was placed at an average rate of 1,100 
feet a month. The maximum rate of 48 feet a day was maintained 
for nearly the entire season. While the backfilling of the easterly 
line was in progress, one 48-foot length of pipe was crowded off the 
pile platform, and had to be replaced by the contractor. 

Both lines of pipe were subjected to contract tests for tightness 
after completion, and were found to satisfy contract requirements. 

Section 44, Quincy . 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frederick D. Smith. 

Contractor for sewer, sand-catcher, and screen-chamber and building foundations. — W. H. 
Ellis, Boston, Mass. 

Contractor for screen-house superstructure and chimney. — Woodbury & Leighton Com- 
pany, Boston, Mass. 

Early in the year the screen-chamber, sand-catcher and building 
foundations were completed. About May 1 work on the screen- 
house chimney was begun. The house was designed by Shepley, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 153 

Rutan & Coolidge, architects, and is 78 feet long by 60 feet wide 
and about 40 feet in height. It is built of dark red brick, with 
rustications of gray headers, with Quincy granite trimmings. It 
provides a room about 47 by 48 feet for screens and valves ; a boiler 
room 25 by 30 feet; and a coal storage room 25 feet square, provid- 
ing storage for about 200 tons of coal. In addition, the building 
contains a large vestibule, office and toilet room. The chimney, 
about 100 feet high, is placed at the easterly end of the building. 
The building was completed on October 15, 1904. 

In the boiler room are two 80 horse-power, vertical, internally 
fired, tubular boilers of the Dean type, with shells 80| inches in 
diameter, each boiler having 208 tubes, 2 inches in diameter and 10 
feet long. These boilers were built by Edward Kendall & Sons, 
Cambridge, and furnish steam for heating the building and operating 
the screens in the screen room. 

There are four screens, two in each duplicate channel of the screen 
room. They are about 12 feet square, with clear openings between 
bars of | inch, so that they will intercept practically all the floating 
matter in the sewage that might be found objectionable in the har- 
bor. They are raised and lowered by small reversing engines of the 
Fitchburg type. The screens and connections were furnished and 
erected by the Lockwood Manufacturing Company of East Boston. 
Matters intercepted on the screens are pressed and afterwards burned 
under the boilers. 

The house and machinery were ready for operation early in Oc- 
tober. Considerable grading on Nut Island remains to be completed 
during the coming year. 

Sections 45, 46 and 47, Quincy. . 
These contracts were completed prior to December 31, 1903. 

Filling on Embankment and Completing Rock Island Road, Section 

48, Quincy. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frederick D. Smith. 
Contractor. — J. J. Moebs, Boston, Mass. 

For completing embankment filling, and loaming and grading the 
slopes, a contract was arranged early in the year, involving the 
placing of 6,600 yards of sand filling, 4,400 yards of loam on em- 
bankment slopes, and about 670 j^ards of broken stone over the line 



1M METROPOLITAN WATEK [Pub. Doe. 

of Rook Island Road, bo called, passing the embankment. The 
work of filling and grading commenced about June 10, and was 
completed about October 15, 1904. 

Sections is to 7~>, inclusivt . 

The work through Quinoy, Milton, Hyde Park and Roxbury was 
completed to the end of the force mains for the Ward Street pump- 
ing station at Parker Hill, Roxbury, prior to the beginning of the 
year, and has been fully described in earlier reports, under sections 
is to 75. 

Section 76, Roxbury, 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 
ractor. — H. P. Nawn, Boston, Mas-. 

This section consists of duplicate lines of l*-inch cast-iron force 
mains and appurtenances, extending from near the Ward Street 
pumping station to the end of the Section 75 tunnel near the 
corner ot St. Alphonsus and Tremont streets, Roxbury. The 
easterly line extends through Ward, Phillips, Conant, Oregon, 
Smith and St. Alphonsus streets, and the westerly through Ward 
and St. Alphonsus streets. 

The cast-iron pipe under this contract was all laid last year, as 
described in the third annual report. At the beginning of the year 
a small amount of masonry remained to be introduced in the valve- 
chamber at the upper end of the pipe lines on St. Alphonsus Street. 
This was completed the latter part of January. During the year 
controlling valves have been installed in this chamber, and the 
lines tested for leakage. A pressure of about 60 pounds per square 
inch, as specified in the contract, was applied to the pipes, which 
were found sufficiently tight. 

Section 77, Roxbury. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 

Contractor for Pumping Station and Connections. — L. P. Soule & Son, Boston, Mass. 

Contractor for Pumping Plant. — Allis-Chalmers Company, Milwaukee, Wis. 

This section includes the Ward Street pumping "station and its 
connections with force mains and suction sewer. 

The pumping station buildings were described at considerable 
length in the la>t annual report. At the beginning of the year the 
station walls were completed and the roof partially built. The 




WARD STREET PUMPING STATION-Vertical Section and Ground Plan. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 155 

engine house roof was finished in January, and the boiler house 
roof in February. 

The interior finish, excepting the basement and engine room 
floors and the carpenter work at the main entrance on Ward Street, 
was completed early in May. This main entrance and the basement 
floor were finished in September, after the heavy parts of the ma- 
chinery had been moved into the building. Work is now in prog- 
ress on the finished tile floor in the engine room. 

Early in the spring the work of subgrading the grounds and roads 
about the buildings was carried out by day labor, under the direction 
of the Engineer. 

From April to September the 48-inch controlling valves on the 
force mains in the station basement, the Venturi meter on the west- 
erly force main, and a 36-inch cast-iron by-pass pipe, extending 
from the force mains around the station to the suction sewer, were 
placed by day labor, under the direction of the Engineer. 

The Allis-Chalmers Company of Milwaukee, who are furnishing 
and erecting the pumping engines and steam plant at the station, 
commenced erection early in January. The plant consists of two 
50-million gallon, vertical, triple-expansion pumping engines, with 
steam cylinders of 21, 38 and 58 inches diameter. The pump 
plungers are 48 inches in diameter, with 60-inch stroke. The max- 
imum contract lift is 45 feet. The steam is furnished by four 93- 
inch diameter, internally-fired, vertical tubular boilers of the Dean 
type, each having 308 tubes, 2 inches in diameter and 15 feet long. 
It is intended to use two boilers with an engine, and duplicate lines 
of steam piping have been arranged and installed, so that each boiler 
can be used with either engine. 

For lighting the station, two direct-connected generators, having 
a capacity of 350 16-can die-power lamps each, were furnished and 
installed by the American Engine Company of Bound Brook, N. J. 

In the screen room are four screens, two in each duplicate chan- 
nel. They are about 10 feet square, with clear openings between 
bars of -| inch, so that they will intercept practically all the floating- 
matters in the sewage that would interfere with the operation of the 
pumps. These screens are raised and lowered by small reversing 
engines of the Fitchburg type. The screens and connections were 
furnished and erected by the Lockwood Manufacturing Company ot 
East Boston. 



METROPOLITAN WATKi: | Pub. Dor. 

Ei N fini ..ii September 1!», and engine No. 

1 .mi Septem i. rhe formal engine peoified in the con- 

not been made, boi satisfactory arrangements for the use 
prior to their formal test and acoeptanoe have been 
\ die with the ooi o thai the station was put 

int r ice for the disposal of sewage on Ootober I l . 

( £j 78 (tS 3 ') with fix- Charles R 

■ it //"</ . Roxbury {Construction by Day 

) . 

Frank ] < 'apeo. 

1 1 ■ , > .1 . Wright. 

During 1 1 1 * * months of .luh and A.ujrus1 tin 1 aotual connection 

bet? Section 78 of the High-level Sewer and Section A of the 

tarles River \ alley main .sewer was made at the comer of 

rand Ruggles streets. The connection invol\ ed the intro- 

■ ■ 

duction of a bellmouth and valve-chamber along the line of the 

Charles River sewer. The masonry section involved a 12-inch 

arch and an invert of Portland masonry, reinforced with 

Port ete, the whole supported <»n a platform and pile 

it ion. 

The chamber introduced provides for turning the sewage How in 
th< Charles River main -ewer either to the Boston Main Drainage 
Work- or to the Metropolitan High-level Sewer. 

Temporarily during construction the (low in the Charles River 
across the line of the work in 48-inch cast-iron 
pi] ■• 

MAINTKNAN* > 

Scope of Work \ni> Force Employed. 

The maintenance of the Metropolitan Sewerage systems includ< - 

the operation ol 9even stations and 95.5 miles of Metropolitan sew- 

eiving the discharge from 964.5 miles of town and city 

points, ther with the care and. study of inverted 

ms and in the harbor. 

The permanent maintenance force of 115 men Includes 65 engi- 

empl< t the pumping stations, and 50 men 

employed on actual sewer maintenance and care of pumping station 

inds. In the three following tables the use of the completed 

ad other date bown : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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160 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc, 



CAPACITY AM) RESULTS. 

The following tables summarize the pumping records for the vear 
for the Metropolitan stations: — 

North Metropolitan System. 
Deer Island Pumping station. 
At this station arc three submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
pellers or wheels < s .l ; "> feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Key no Ids-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of pumps; 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift . 

Average duty for the year: 45,900,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 57,200,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 3 firemen, b' screenmen and 1 reliefman. 

Coal used: first-quality Cumberland, costing from $3.45 to $3.90 per ton 

Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Deer Island Pump- 
ing Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
l'umpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 
Duty (ft.Jbs. 
per 100 lbs. 
* Coal). 


1904. 

January 


1,603,900,000 


51,700,000 


40,600,000 


90,400,000 


10.74 


44,000,000 


February, . 






1,630,100,000 


56,200,000 


46,200,000 


87,300,000 


10.88 


45,000,000 


March, 






2,462,700,000 


79,400,000 


61,100,000 


124,800,000 


11.72 


51,900,000 


April, 






2,407,400,000 


80,200,000 


52,600,000 


145,000,000 


11.77 


57,100,000 


May, . 






2,458,800,000 


79,300,000 


60,600,000 


119,200,000 


11.66 


57,800,000 


•Tune, . 






1,624,500,000 


54,200,000 


43,100,000 


72,400,000 


10.55 


44,700,000 


July, . 






1,492,900,000 


48,200,000 


40,800,000 


58,100,000 


10.60 


41 ,200,000 


August, 






1,364,400,000 


44,000,000 


36,600,000 


57,800,000 


10.11 


41,200,000 


September, 






1,423,600,000 


47,500,000 


37,300,000 


89,800,000 


10.10 


42,500,000 


October, . 






1,390,700,000 


44,900,000 


37,300,000 


65,300,000 


10.21 


41,300,000 


November, 






1,447,600,000 


48,300,000 


42,600,000 


74,600,000 


10.50 


40,900,000 


December, 






1,613,400,000. 


52,000.000 


44,900,000 


92,700,000 


10.84 


43,600,000 


Total, . 


20,920,000,000 


- 


- 


- 




- 


Average, 






" | 


57,200,000 


45,300,000 


89,800,000 


10.81 


45,900,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



161 



East Boston Pumping Station. 
At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
pellers or wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 56,000,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 55,000,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 3 firemen, 6 screenmen and 1 reliefman. 

Coal used: first-quality Cumberland, costing from $3.30 to $3.90 per ton. 

Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the East Boston Pump- 
ing Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 



Total 
Pumpage 

(Gallons). 



Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 



Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 



Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 
Lift 

(Feet). 



Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 



1904 



January, 
February, 
March, 
April, 
May, . 
June, . 
July, . 
August, 
September, 
October, . 
November, 
December, 

Total, . 

Average, 



1,541,900,000 
1,572,100,000 
2,400,700,000 
2,347,400,000 
2,396,800,000 
1,564,500,000 
1,375,900,000 
1,297,400,000 
1,363,600,000' 
1,328,700,000 
1,387,600,000 
1,551,400,000 



20,128,000,000 



49,700,000 
54,200,000 
77,400,000 
78,200,000 
77,300,000 
52,200,000 
44,400,000 
41,900,000 
45,500,000 
42,900,000 
46,300,000 
50,000,000 



38,600,000 
44,200,000 
59,100,000 
60,600,000 
58,600,000 
41,100,000 
37,800,000 
34,600,000 
35,300,000 
35,300,000 
40,600,000 
42,900,000 



55,000,000 



43,200,000 



88,400,000 


15.19 


85,300,000 


15.31 


122,800,000 


15.51 


143,000,000 


15.53 


117,200,000 


15.57 


70,400,000 


15.27 


53,100,000 


15.17 


55,800,000 


15.26 


87,800,000 


16.13 


63,300,000 


16.14 


72,600,000 


16.29 


90,700,000 


16.34 


87,500,000 


15.64 



52,600,000 
50,500,000 
58,800,000 
61,100,000 
60,500,000 
57,200,000 
54,400,000 
56,600,000 
55,300,000 
55,100,000 
56,200,000 
53,100,000 

56,000,000 



162 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Charlestown Pumping station. 

At tin- station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of 
them having impellers or wheels 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 
8.25 feet in diameter. They arc driven by triple-expansion engines 
of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of pumps: two, 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift; one, 60,000,000 

gallons, with 8-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 43,200,000 foot-pounds. 
Averagr quantity raised each day: 31,100,000 gallons. 
Force employed: 3 engineers, 3 firemen, 6 screenmen and 1 reliefman. 
Coal used : first quality Cumberland, costing from $3.45 to $4.38 per ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Charlestown 
Pumping Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft -lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1904. 

January, . 






1,000,600,000 


32,300,000 


26,600,000 


48,600,000 


8.05 


40,900,000 


February, . 






966,100,000 


33,300,000 


28,300,000 


49,300,000 


8.07 


42,100,000 


March, 






1,198,800,000 


38,700,000 


31,300,000 


67,900,000 


8.43 


51,100,000 


April, 






1,161,000,000 


38,700,000 


29,200,000 


64,000,000 


3.43 


52,900,000 


May, . 






1,171,000,000 


37,800,000 


31,300,000 


51,800,000 


8.38 


53,900,000 


June, . 






875,800,000 


29,200,000 


24,500,000 


34,500,000 


7.84 


39,600,000 


July, . 






865,000,000 


27,900,000 


24,200,000 


34,400,000 


7.77 


39,000,000 


August, 






858,700,000 


27,700,000 


24,200,000 


36,200,000 


7.72 


41,200,000 


September, 






842,000,000 


28,100,000 


22,800,000 


49,000,000 


7.75 


42,300,000 


October, . 






765,500,000 


24,700,000 


20,800,000 


34,400,000 


7.97 


36,900,000 


November, 






786,800,000 


26,200,000 


23,200,000 


39,300,000 


7.81 


39,200,000 


December, 






902,700,000 


29,100,000 


24,200,000 


46,700,000 


7.85 


39,800,000 


Total, . 


11,394,000,000 


- " 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


31,100,000 


25,900,000 


45,500,000 


8.01 


43,200,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



163 



Alewife Brook Pumping Station. 
The plant at this station consists of the original installation of 
small commercial pumps and engines, i.e., two 9-inch Andrews 
vertical centrifugal pumps, with direct-connected compound marine 
engines, together with the recent additions. The latter consist of a 
specially designed engine of the vertical cross-compound type, hav- 
ing between the cylinders a centrifugal pump rotating on a horizontal 



'to 

axis. 



Contract capacity of the two original pumps: 4,500,000 gallons each, with 13-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of new pump: 13,000,000 gallons, with 13-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 17,900,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 3,546,000 gallons. 

Force employed : 3 engineers. 

Coal used : first quality Cumberland, costing from $3.71 to $4.73 per ton. 

Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Alewife Brook 
Pumping Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft. -lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1 

January, 


904 




110,062,000 


3,550,000 


2,692,000 


7,167,000 


12.96 


18,200,000 


February, 








116,379,000 


4,013,000 


2,881,000 


7,580,000 


12.98 


20,400,000 


March, 








183,565,000 


5,921,000 


3,968,000 


8,996,000 


12.49 


24,400,000 


April, 








156,351,000 


5,212,000 


3,788,000 


9,173,000 


12.41 


22,200,000 


May, . 








158,906,000 


5,126,000 


3,380,000 


7,875,000 


12.45 


22,100,000 


June, . 








101,217,000 


3,374,000 


2,598,000 


4,677,000 


12.83 


16,600,000 


July, . 








■ 84,397,000 


2,723,000 


1,994,000 


4,027,000 


13.15 


16,100,000 


August, 








69,408,000 


2,239,000 


1,545,000 


3,526,000 


13.25 


13,800,000 


September, 




• 


81,272,000 


2,709,000 


1,616,000 


6,400,000 


13.25 


15,800,000 


October, . 






74,171,000 


2,393,000 


1,868,000 


3,574,000 


13.23 


14,300,000 


November, 






74,625,000 


2,487,000 


2,120,000 


4,554,000 


13.25 


14,600,000 


December, 






86,766,000 


2,799,000 


2,414,000 


6,335,000 


13.29 


15,900,000 


Total, . 


1,297,119,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, . 






- 


3,546,000 


2,572,000 


6,157,000 


12.96 


17,900,000 



uu 



METROPOLITAN WATEB 



[Pub. Doc. 



Soi in Metropolitan System. 
Quincy Pumping statin,,. 
At this statiod are two compound condensing Dcane pumping 



engines. 



Contract capacity of pumps: one, 3,000,000 gallons, the other, 5,000,000 gallons, with 36- 

foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 36,400,000 foot-pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: ."5,051,000 gallons. 
Force employed: 3 engineers and 1 screennian. 
Coal used: first-quality Cumberland, costing from $4.20 to $5.04 per ton. 

Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Quincy Pumping 
Station of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallone). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft. -lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1904 

January, . 






81,296,000 


2,622,000 


2,291,000 


3,182,000 


36.32 


29,900,000 


February, . 






98,621,000 


3,401,000 


2,591,000 


5,427,000 


37.73 


35,500,000 


March, 






177,415,000 


5,723,000 


4,675,000 


8,391,000 


36.12 


40,500,000 


April, 






161,500,000 


5,383,000 


4,608,000 


8,367,000 


36.62 


43,200,000 


May, . 






185,903,000 


5,997,000 


5,080,000 


7,654,000 


39.25 


43,500,000 


June, . 






131,342,000 


4,378,000 


2,900,000 


5,227,000 


33.84 


42,200,000 


July, . 






96,760,000 


3,121,000 


2,480,000 


4,419,000 


36.10 


35,900,000 


August, 






80,153,000 


2,586,000 


2,347,000 


3,157,000 


36.50 


34,200,000 


September, 






80,270,000 


2,675,000 


2,225,000 


3,882,000 


35.90 


34,200,000 


October, . 






80,113,000 


2,584,000 


2,396,000 


3,527,000 


36.19 


32,800,000 


November, 






84,070,000 


2,712,000 


2,533,000 


3,605,000 


36.04 


32,500,000 


December, 






81,367,000 


2,625,000 


2,059,000 


3,132,000 


37.72 


32,900,000 


Total, . 


1,338,810,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


3,651,000 


3,015,000 


4,998,000 


36.53 


36,400,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD, 



165 



Ward Street Pumping Station. 
At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping en- 
gines, of the Allis-Chalmers type, operating reciprocating pumps, 
the plungers of which are 48 inches in diameter with a 60-inch 
stroke. 

Contract capacity of pumps: 50,000,000 gallons each, with 45-foot lift. 
Average quantity raised each day from October 14, 1904 to December 31, 1904: 12,700,000 
gallons. 

Table of Approximate Quantities at the Ward Street Pumping Station oj the 

South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 



Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 



Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 



Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 



Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 



October,* . 
November, 
December, 



1904. 



183,900,000 
406,700,000 
412,300,000 



10,200,000 
13,600,000 
13,300,000 



6,900,000 

7,900,000 

10,800,000 



13,500,000 
27,500,000 
23,100,000 



Total, . 
Average, 



1,002,900,000 



12,700,000 



8,500,000 



21,400,000 



* From October 14 only. 

In the following tables the total cost of pumping and the rate 
per million foot-gallons at each of five pumping stations are shown 
in detail : — 

Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Deer Island Station. 

Volume (20,920 Million Gallons) xLift (10.81 Feet)=226,145 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 



$11,368 51 

7,330 20 

192 02 

74 47 

1,209 60 

72 30 

916 44 

$21,163 54 



$0.05027 
.03241 
.00085 
.00033 
.00535 
.00032 
.00405 

$0.09358 



L66 



METROPOLITAN WATER. 



[Pub. Doc. 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the East Boston Station. 

Volume (20,128 Million Gallon*) xLift (15.64 Feet)=314,802 Million Foot-gallons. 



I T | M - . 



Labor, 

Coal 



Wante 

Water 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 



Cost. 



$10,550 24 

7,997 52 

253 77 

55 77 

940 80 

11 78 

536 89 



$20,346 77 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



$0.03351 
.02540 
.00081 
.00018 
.00299 
.00004 
.00171 



$0.06464 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Charlestown Station. 

Volume (11,394 Million Gallons) x Lift (8.01 Feet;=91,266 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor 

Coal 

Oil 

Waste 

Water 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 



$9,985 88 

3,156 35 

171 30 

70 49 

410 40 

76 77 

669 51 



$14,540 70 



$0.10942 
.03458 
.00188 
.00077 
.00449 
.00084 
.00734 



$0.15932 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Alewife Brook 

Station. 

Volume (1,297.119 Million Gallons) X Lift (12.96 Feet) =16,811 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor 

Coal, 

Oil, 

Waste 

Water 

Packing 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 



$3,377 09 

1,630 38 

110 91 

40 57 

242 40 

19 77 

447 76 



$5,868 88 



$0.20089 
.09698 
.00659 
.00241 
.01442 
.00118 
.02664 



$0.34911 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Quincy Station. 

Volume (1,338.81 Million Gallons) X Lift (36.53 Feet) = 48,907 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal 

Oil 

Waste 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 



$3,888 97 

2,583 85 

26 95 

10 43 

201 86 

39 84 

633 15 



$0.07952 
.05283 
.00055 
.00021 
.00413 
.00082 
.01294 



$7,385 05 



$0.15100 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 167 

Material Intercepted at the Screens. 
The sewage of the North Metropolitan District, on entering the 
three main line pumping stations and before reaching the pumps, 
is screened through cages, provided in duplicate, and raised or low- 
ered by steam power. This intercepted material consists of rags, 
paper and other floating matter, and amounted to a total of about 
2,084 cubic yards during the year. This is equivalent to about 2.7 
cubic feet for each million gallons of sewage pumped at Deer Island. 

Care of Special Structures. 

During the year the wharf at Deer Island has been reinforced 
with 50 new oak piles, and some of the stringers and a portion of 
the planking have also been renewed. The cast-iron water piping 
in the grounds about the pumping station has been extended during 
the year to improve the fire protection at the dwelling house and 
lockers, involving the placing ot about 1,000 feet of 4-inch and 
6-inch pipe and 2 hydrants. About 400 tons of riprap have been 
deposited on Deer Island bar over the line of the outfall sewer. 

Heavy riprap has been placed on the earth slopes about the shore 
structures at both ends of the Maiden River siphon, and the em- 
bankment over the sewer across the marsh on the Everett side of 
the siphon has been repaired. This work has involved the placing 
of 500 tons of stone. 

The sewage flow in the old Mystic valley sewer in Winchester 
has at times surcharged the sewer, so that it has been found desir- 
able to connect the Cummingsville branch, Section 47, with the 
low-level sewer, Section 44, built in 1893. This connection was 
made by the maintenance force during the year. About 130 feet of 
18-inch Akron pipe, reinforced with concrete, were laid at an average 
depth of 10 feet from near the junction of Lake and Main streets, 
through Lake Street, to the lower end of the siphon under the 
Wedge Pond culvert. The siphon is thus abandoned and a free out- 
let at a lower level obtained for the Cummingsville branch, thereby 
to a great extent relieving the old Mystic valley sewer. 

Studies of sewage flow in the Metropolitan sewers, siphons and 
outfall pipes indicate freedom from deposits and satisfactory condi- 
tions in general. 



L68 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



FUTURE EXTENSION OF THE METROPOLITAN SEWER 
INTO THE HIGHER TERRITORY OF BROOKLINE, 
BRIGHTON AND NEWTON. 

The Board was directed, 1>\ chapter 230 of the legislative Acts of 
1904, "to determine the location, .elevation and size of the Metro- 
politan High-level Sewer above the point where the sewage from 
the Charles River valley is to be received."' 

South Metropolitan System. 
Chapter 4*24 of the legislative Acts of 1899 constituted the South 
Metropolitan System by combining the original Charles River Met- 
ropolitan district, the original Neponset valley Metropolitan dis- 
trict, the city of Quincy, and parts of the Dorchester, Roxbury and 
West Roxbury districts of the city of Boston. The system as at 
present constituted provides for the drainage of 102 square miles of 
Metropolitan territory in Suffolk, Norfolk and Middlesex counties, 
and includes the whole or parts of 9 cities and towns, having a pres- 
ent population of 3 18, 000, as set forth in the following table, and 
outlined on the general map accompanying this report : — 



Table No. 1. 



Showing Areas and Populations in South Metropolitan Dis- 
trict December oi, 1904. 



City or Town. 



Area (Square 
Miles). 



Population, 

December 31, 

1904. 



Boston (portions of), 

Brookline, 

Pedham,* 

Ilyde Park, 

Milton 

Xewton, 

Quincy 

Waltham, 

Watertown 

Totals, 

* Part of town. 



20.92 

6.81 

9.40 

4.57 

12.59 

18.03 

12.56 

13.63 

4.04 



102.55 



155,800 
25,100 

7,400 
14,700 

7,900 
39,900 
28,400 
27,600 
11,500 



318,300 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



169 



The higher portions of this district, embracing an area of 64 
square miles, with a present population of 179,000, are at sufficient 
elevation to permit their sewage to be collected in a trunk sewer 
and conveyed by gravity to an outlet in the harbor. The sewage 
from the 39 square miles of lower territory, w 7 ith a present popu- 
lation of 139,000, will always need to be pumped. This division 
of the South Metropolitan territory into high-level and low-level 
sections is outlined on the general map and set forth in the fol- 
lowing tables : — 

Table No. 2. — Showing Area of Sovth Metropolitan District that may be 
drained by Gravity, with Estimated Population December 31, 1904. 



City or Town. 



Area (Square 
Miles). 



Population, 

December 31, 

1904. 



Boston 

Brookline, 

Dedbam,* 

Hyde Park, 

Milton, 

Newton 

Quincy 

Totals 

* Part of town. 




Table No. 3. — Showing Area of South Metropolitan District the Sewage 
from ivhich will require Pumping, with Estimated Population December 
31, 1904. 



City or Town. 



Area (Square 
Miles). 



Population, 

December 31, 

1904. 



Boston, 
Brookline, 
Milton, . 
Newton, 
Quincy, 
Waltbam, 
Watertown, 
Totals, 




170 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The High-level Sewer, 

Chapter 42 1 of the Acts of 1899 further authorized the construc- 
tion and operation of a main sewer and appurtenances, known as the 
High-level Sewer, for the disposal of sewage from this South 
Metropolitan area by gravity. This trunk sewer has been under 
construction for the past four years, and has but recently been com- 
pleted and put into operation. It is designed to receive and carry 
by gravity the sewage from the (>4 square miles of high-level ter- 
ritory outlined in 'Fable No. 2. Sewage from the original Charles 
River district [sal present lifted to it by pumps at a station on Ward 
Street in Koxbury. The sewage of parts of the city of Quincy will 
be pumped to it at a station in Merrymount Park in that city. A 
small district of about 2 square miles, from which sewage may 
eventually be raised to the High-level Sewer, includes portions of 
Dorchester and Milton, extending from Hyde Park to Granite 
Bridge. It is at present tributary to the lower portion of the origi- 
nal Xeponset valley Metropolitan sewer, and will probably con- 
tinue to discharge into the Boston Main Drainage Works for some 
years. # 

The High-level Sewer, so far as authorized by legislative acts and 
already constructed and in operation, has a length of about 17 miles, 
extending from the Ward Street pumping station in Koxbury to 
an outlet in the outer harbor a mile below Nut Island in Quincy. 
The outfall works involve two lines of 60-inch cast-iron pipe 
laid below the bed of the harbor, from the outlet to Nut Island. 
A screen-house, sand-catcher and gate-chamber for regulating the 
sewage flow are located on the island. At this point the sewer 
is about 11 feet wide and 12 feet high. Its invert, by the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage base, which is 100 feet below the city of 
Boston base, is at elevation 110, or mean high water of the 
harbor. It extends through Quincy, follows along Unkety and 
Pine Tree Brook valleys in Milton to Hyde Park, thence passing 
through the Neponset-Stony Brook divide, along the westerly side 
of the Stony Brook valley to near the easterly side of Jamaica Pond, 
at the junction of Perkins and Centre streets in Jamaica Plain, 
where a branch has been left for future extension of the works into 
the higher territory of Brookline, Brighton and Newton. At this 
point it is about 9 feet in diameter, and its invert elevation is about 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 171 

131.5 feet, or 21.5 feet above mean high water of the harbor. From 
here the sewer is 6 feet 6 inches wide and 7 feet high, and extends 
northerly through Parker Hill to near the junction of St. Alphonsus 
and Smith streets in Roxbury, connecting with two 48-inch force 
mains from the Ward Street pumping station, which convey to it the 
sewage from the original Charles River main sewer. A detailed 
description of this construction is given in the eleventh and twelfth 
reports of the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and the first to 
fourth reports of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Present Need of defining Location for Extension of High-level 

Sewer. 

Section 8 of chapter 424 of the Acts of 1899 provides that only 
separate sewage from new districts shall be received into the High- 
level Sewer. Chapter 383 of the Acts of 1903 requires that " Any 
city or town using any metropolitan sewer may, in any year, and 
shall in any year specified by the officer or board having charge of 
said sewers, expend one-twentieth of one per cent, of its taxable 
valuation, to be met by loan outside the debt limit, in the construc- 
tion, in connection with said sewers, of branch intercepting sewers, 
connections of existing sewers with intercepting sewers, branch 
drains, sewers or drains in any street where one thereof only shall 
have been built, and the necessary connections aforesaid." Chapter 
465 of the Acts of 1903 provides for a park basin in the Charles 
River valley above Craigie Bridge. All these facts foreshadow an 
early construction of separate systems of sewerage by municipalities 
of the South Metropolitan District which at present have combined 
sewers. 

The town of Brookline and the Back Bay, Brighton, Roxbury, 
West Roxbury and Dorchester districts of the city of Boston are 
now largely sewered on the combined system. To proceed intelli- 
gently with the design for separate systems of sewerage for these dis- 
tricts requires detailed information relating to the future extension 
of the High-level Sewer. Studies to develop this information are 
authorized by the recent legislative action (chapter 230, Acts of 
1904), directing the Board to define the location and size of this 
extension. 



L72 



METROPOLITAN WATEB 



[Pub. Doc. 



District Involved in Study for Extension of the High-level Sewer. 

Metropolitan areas that may be traversed bv this extension are 



set forth in the following table : — 



Table No. 4. — Shoiviiiy Areas Involved in Study for Extension of the 
High-level Sewer above Jamaica. Plain. 



Citt or Town. 


Area 
(Square 
Miles). 


City 


or Town. 


Area 

(Square 
Miles). 


Boston . — 




Newton, 


. 


18.03 


Back Bay district, . . * . 


1.61 


Waltham, 





13.63 


Brighton district, .... 


4.27 
0.18 


Total, . 




4.04 


West Roxbury (part of), . 


48.57 










■ 



Anticipated Volume of Sewage. 

To determine the size for the extension of this sewer through the 
territory set forth above involves certain approximations of the vol- 
ume of sewage to be anticipated in future years. In public works 
of this character provision is usually made for a generation. The 
High-level Sewer already constructed was intended to provide for 
anticipated conditions in the year 1940, and it would seem proper to 
provide for this extension to the same date. Sewage which reaches 
an intercepting sewer of this character is made up largely of public 
and private water supplies, leakage of ground water into the sewer, 
and a small amount of surface water. It is usual to estimate its 
volume by a per capita rate. 

Population. 

Several forecasts of population on Metropolitan areas have been 
prepared by the engineers of the Metropolitan TTater Board, Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Commission and State Board of Health. There 
is a substantial agreement in all these forecasts, and the population- 
adopted for this study and set forth in the following table are as 
liberal as any that have been suggested. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



173 



Table No. 5. — Forecasts of Populations for Areas Involved in Studies 
for the Extension of the High-level Sewer above Jamaica Plain, from 
A.D. 1905 to 1940. 





Estimated Populations. 


City or Town. 


1905. 


1910. 


1915. 


1920. 


1935. 


1930. 


1935. 


1940. 


Boston : — 


















Back Bay district, . 


24,400 


28,000 


31,000 


34,500 


39,000 


45,000 


52,000 


60,000 


Brighton district, 


24,400 


31,000 


38,200 


47,100 


57,100 


68,000 


80,000 


93,000 


West Roxbury (part of), 


350 


550 


850 


1,250 


1,700 


2,200 


2,800 


3,500 


Brookline, 


25,100 


32,500 


41,000 


60,000 


61,000 


73,000 


86,000 


101,000 




39,900 


52,500 


66,000 


80,000 


95,000 


111,000 


127,000 


144,000 




27,600 


34,000 


40,800 


49,000 


58,800 


69,000 


79,000 


89,000 




11,500 


14,500 


17,500 


21,000 


25,500 


30,500 


36,000 


42,000 


Totals, 


153,250 


193,050 


235,350 


282,850 


338,100 


398,700 


462,800 


532,500 



A subdivision of these populations has been prepared, indicating 
what may be anticipated on areas drained by gravity, and what may 
be assumed to be permanently tributary to the low-level system, as 



set forth in the following table : - 



171 



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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 175 

From this table it appears that the total present population on 
areas tributary by gravity to an extension of the High-level Sewer 
may be 45,350, and that in 1940 it may have increased to 177,500 ; 
and that the present population on the low-level pumped area may 
be 106,600, and in 1940 may have increased to 337,500. 

Per Capita Rate to be used in Determining Size of Sewer. 
The amount of sewage per capita to be provided for in the earlier 
years in the district under discussion may be judged practically from 
the Boston Main Drainage and the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, 
which have both been in operation many years. The latter receives 
sewage from areas sewered about equally on the separate and com- 
bined systems, not unlike the present condition of the territory to be 
traversed by the proposed extension of the High-level Sewer. In 
1898 an extended study was prepared by the Engineer of the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Works, involving a comprehensive review of 
volumes of sewage from both works. Per capita rates deduced 
from that study and adopted for the High-level Sewer already built, 
designed ultimately to receive sewage from separate sewers only, are 
as follows : — 

1905. 1940. 

Yearly average flow of sewage, . . 147 175 

Maximum dry weather flow, 165 200 

Maximum flow during storms, 251 300 

Studies of sewage flows in Metropolitan sewers since 1898 indicate 
that the above conclusions from earlier studies are fully justified. 

This extension of the High-level Sewer above Jamaica Plain is to 
receive sewage from cities and towns that are now or in the near 
future probably will be sewered on the separate system, from which 
practically all surface waters will be excluded. The present water 
supply of many of these cities and towns is comparatively small, 
not more than one-half of the average water supply of the whole 
Metropolitan District which was involved in establishing the above 
rates, so that 300 gallons per capita might appear unnecessarily 
liberal for fixing the size of this extension. Some of the municipal- 
ities, however, are already provided with separate sewers designed 



17C METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

on 11 rate exceeding 200 gallons per capita when running full, and 
many oi those local sewers are now occasionally surcharged. This 
sewer will be located at considerable distance inland from the Charles 
River, so that occasional overflows into the river cannot be provided 
to relieve any future lack of capacity. It is also possible that in 
the future a larger area and population than now studied may be 
made tributary to this extension. 

The increased sizes of sewer resulting from this liberal rate per 
capita will add but a small percentage to the cost of the work. 
There is a persistent increase in water consumption in the whole 
Metropolitan District. Population is advancing at phenomenal and 
unanticipated rates, particularly in the outlying sections to be tra- 
versed by this extension, and all experience gained from the opera- 
tion of the Metropolitan Works dictates the most liberal treatment 
for extensions into outlying territory. The rates already adopted 
for the earlier high-level construction and set forth above are there- 
fore felt to be justified for this extension and have been adopted in 
this study. 

The volume of sewage estimated from the before-mentioned rates 
of flow per capita and the population given in the tables is set forth 
in Table Xo. 7 : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOAKD, 



177 



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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 181 

Relief for the Existing Charles River Main Sewer. 

Until an extension of the High-level Sewer to the territory pro- 
posed shall have been constructed, the volume of sewage from both 
high and low districts, set forth in Table No. 7, will continue to be 
tributary to the existing Charles River valley sewer. The capacity 
of this sewer and its relation to volumes of sewage flow from the 
whole district are set forth graphically on diagrams Nos. 1, 2 and 
3 : at Vancouver Street, in the Back Bay district of Boston ; above 
Brookline, at the Brighton-Newton line; and at the end of the 
Charles River main sewer in Newton. 

From the table and diagrams it appears that as early as 1907 
overflows during storms will undoubtedly occur through Brighton 
and Brookline, and that dry weather flows may fill the sewer about 
1915 through the same territory. The large pumps of the Ward 
Street station will doubtless quicken the flow of sewage in the lower 
section of this main sewer. It is not anticipated that they can 
materially delay the date when storm overflows will occur. Relief 
for this district should be provided at an early date, before the 
storm overflows become so frequent and offensive as to be objection- 
able in the lower Charles River basin. Above Brighton, through 
the city of Newton, relief may be delayed for ten years, until 1915 
or later. 

The future condition of the existing Charles River valley main 
sewer after it shall have been relieved by the proposed extension 
above Jamaica Plain is exhibited on diagrams Nos. 4, 5 and 6. 
From these diagrams it appears that storm overflows from this 
sewer may be expected from 1920 to 1925, and that dry weather 
flows may fill the sewer in the year 1930 or later. 



182 



MKTROPOLITAX WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



DIAGRAM No. 1, — Compariso?i of the Estimated Flow of Scwayc and the 
Capacity of the Charles Hirer Valley Sewer at Vancouver and Buggies 
Streets, Back Bag, using Total Estimated High-level and Low-level Pojm- 
lations. 



120 



A 100 

h 

P. 



C 
O 

— 
i— i 
c3 
O 

C 

o 



80 



60 



S 40 



20 




120 



" o3 
100 p 

A 

80 K 

a 
o 



60 



40 ^ 



20 



1300 



1910 



1920 



1930 



1940 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



183 



Diagram No. 2. — Comparison of the Estimated Flow of Sewage and the 
Capacity of the Charles River Valley Sewer at Cottage Farm, Brighton, 
using Total Estimated High-level and Low-level Populations. 




110 



100 





>» 


90 


03 



80 






ft 


70 






m 




a 


80 






50 w 

O 

40 C 
o 

30 Z 

20 

10 



1900 



1910 



1920 



1930 



1940 



1M 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



DIAGRAM No : } ..^ Comparison of the Estimated Flow of Sewage and the 
Capacity of the Charles Rivt r Valley Sewer at Cheesecake Brook, Newton, 
and at S'cw ton- Brighton Town Line, using Total Estimated High-level 
and Low-level Populations, 



a 



50 



40 



30 



20 



10 



4 50 




1900 



1910 



60 



50 



- 40 



30 



20 



10 




0D 

a 

70 O 

i— < 

OS 



60 



50 



40 -■ 
30 
20 
10 



1900 



1910 



1920 



1930 



1940 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



185 



Diagram No. 4. — Comparison of the Estimated Flow of Sewage and the 
Capacity of the Charles River Valley Sewer at Vancouver and Buggies 
Streets, Back Bay, using Total Estimated Low-level Populations. 



80 



70 



60 



50 



o3 40 
© 

fl 30 
o 

r_i •*« 

* 20 



10 




1900 



1910 



1920 



1930 



1940 



Diagram No. 5. — Comparison of the Estimated Flow of Sewage and the 
Capacity of the Charles Biver Valley Sewer at Cottage Farm, Brighton, 
using Total Estimated Low-level Populations. 



e3 

Q 

u 
ft 

n 
o 



70 



60 



50 



Z 40 

d 

O 



33 



-h 20 



10 




1900 | 



1930 



1940 



186 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Diagram No. G. — Comparison of the Estimated Flow of Sewage and the 
Capacity of the Charles River Valley Sewer at Cheesecake Brook, Newton, 
and at Newton-Brighton Town Line, using Total Estimated Low-level 
Populations. 



40 



30 



o3 20 



10 



A 




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20 c3 



10 



a 



■ 
c 

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g 
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1900 



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1920 



1930 



1940 



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10 




CO 

a 

o 

50^ 


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O 

30 «h 



20 



10 



1900 



1910 



1920 



1930 



1940 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



187 



Possible Future Additions to the South Metropolitan System. 

Under authority of chapter 65 of the Resolves of 1899, the State 
Board of Health reviewed the project for a high-level gravity sewer 
for the relief of the Charles and Neponset River valley Metropolitan 
areas, and, among other suggestions in relation thereto, recom- 
mended that small areas in the towns of Weston, Wellesley and 
Needham, along the westerly border of the Charles River, be added 
to the South Metropolitan District. By legislative act, the district 
is limited at present by the easterly border of the Charles River at 
Newton and Waltham. The South Metropolitan District and the 
area recommended to be added are both outlined on the general 
map. 

The present population on the area that may be added west of the 
Charles River is about 2,800, and in 1940 may be 15,000. This 
area is so located that its drainage may be collected without pump- 
ing in an existing main sewer of the city of Newton, which extends 
from near the end of the Charles River Metropolitan sewer through 
Auburndale and Newton Lower Falls. If at a future date this por- 
tion of Weston, Wellesley and Needham should be added to the 
South Metropolitan District by legislative act, its drainage may be 
provided for by purchasing a length of about 7 miles of local main 
sewer of the city of Newton, and incorporating it as a section of the 
Metropolitan System. This length of sewer is shown on the general 
map and outlined in Table No. 8 : — 

Table No. 8. — Newton Main Sewers that may be purchased to provide for 
Drainage of Wellesley and Needham. 



Size. 



Length 

(Miles). 



Location. 



Remarks. 



24"X36", . 



20"X30", 



20" cast-iron pipe, . 

6", 8" and 16" cast-iron 
pipe siphons. 

Total, 



5.15 



2.13 

.05 
.07 

7.40 



From Charles River valley sewer along 
Cheesecake Brook, Watertown, Wash- 
ington and Border streets, private 
land, Commonwealth Avenue, Bourne 
and Charles streets, along Charles 
River, St. Mary's, Concord and Wash- 
ington streets. 

In Washington Street, Quinobequln 
Road and along Charles River to Eliot 
Street. 

Along Charles River near Echo Bridge, 

Across Charles River near Echo Bridge, 



4.45 miles earth open cut, 
.68 mile rock open cut, 
.02 mile earth tunnel. 



1.43 miles earth open cut, 
.59 mile rock open cut, 
.11 mile rock tunnel. 

Rock open cut. 

Rock cut. 



188 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

This length of sewer was constructed by the city of Newton at a 
cost of 1289,000. It would be necessary to extend pipes across the 
Charles River at several points where drainage of this added district 
will naturally collect, and these pipes and the purchase of the local 
sewer ot the city ol Newton would involve an expenditure of about 
$300,000 to provide for the future drainage from these added areas. 
The drainage from so small a population as outlined for these areas 
can safely be provided for in the existing Newton sewer for many, 
years. The addition of these areas to the South Metropolitan Dis- 
trict will hasten the necessity of future relief for the Charles River 
main sewer by a few years. 

Extension, of High-level Sewer recommended. 
The extension recommended is outlined on the general plan and 
profile accompanying this report. The lengths, sizes and elevations 
of the sewer are set forth in Table No. 9 : — 



57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD, 



189 













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190 METEOPOLITAN WATEB [Pub. Doc. 

From this tabic it appears that the extension recommended in- 
volves a length ol 10 miles of trunk -ewer, varying in size trom 7 to 
1 feet in diameter. The anticipated volumes of sewage, outlined in 
Table No. 7, at the rate of inclination recommended, will fill the 
sewers to about two-thirds of their height. The minimum inclina- 
tion or rate of grade adopted will produce scouring velocities when 
the -ewer is running one-fourth full. This will probably be its con- 
dition when constructed and put into operation. 

The location recommended is at considerable distance inland from 
the (liarlcs River, and, as shown on the profile, the construction 
necessarily involves a series of deep excavations where the sewer 
pierces the divides between brooks, followed by a series of shallow 
excavations crossing the valleys. Near Oak Square in Brighton, 
and in Vernon, Eldredgc, Hollis, Norwood and Harvard streets in 
Newton, the arch of the sewer will approach so near to the street 
surface that the introduction of short lengths of 60-inch cast-iron 
pipe is recommended. Passing these locations, it will be necessary 
to construct short lengths of small local lateral sewers, to intercept 
house drains that may be broken off by the Metropolitan sewer. 

In the sewer route recommended no attempt has been made to 
follow the outline of the high-level district, the location following 
generally in public highways and along the shortest and most direct 
line. Two short branch lines would, however, be required in 
Brighton, reaching out to the borders of the district to intercept 
local main sewers, as indicated on the general map. 

Beginning near the corner of Centre and Perkins streets in 

© © 

Jamaica Plain, the construction will follow westerly through Perkins 
Street in rock tunnel at a depth of about 70 feet below the surface 
for a distance of 700 feet, where the construction will leave the rock 
and enter strata of wet sand and gravel, passing the northerly end 
of Jamaica Pond. To secure impermeability to masonry and main- 
tain the present level of the water of the pond, the sewer will need 
to be constructed by pneumatic process along Perkins Street, 
Jamaica Plain, and Chestnut Street, Brookline, for a distance of 
about 4,300 feet, to the corner of Chestnut and Kendall streets in 
Brookline, where rock will again be encountered. Beyond Chest- 
nut Street the route recommended follows along Kendall and 
Cypress streets to Boylston Street in rock tunnel, for a distance 
of 1,500 feet. Beyond Boylston Street the route follows in earth 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 191 

cut, generally in sand and gravel, at an average depth of 20 feet, 
through Cypress Street, Brington Road and private land under 
the Boston & Albany Railroad near the Brooldine Hills station, 
through the Brooldine playground, to the corner of Gorham Avenue 
and Davis Street ; and thence through Gorham Avenue, Greenough, 
Washington and Park streets, a total distance of 2,975 feet. In 
Park Street, near Washington Street, the size of the sewer will 
be reduced from 6 feet 6 inches by 7 feet to 6 feet 3 inches by 6 
feet 6 inches. The sewer will continue through Park, Beacon 
and Winchester streets in open cut at an average depth of 25 
feet to a point in Winchester Street near Beacon Street, a distance 
of 2,150 feet; here it will enter earth tunnel about 35 feet below 
the surface, extending through Winchester Street and private land 
to Columbia Street, a distance in tunnel of 2,125 feet. Following 
through Columbia Street in open cut in sand and gravel for a dis- 
tance of 1,095 feet, the size will again be reduced to 5 feet 9 inches 
by 6 feet near the Brookline-Brighton boundary line. 

In Brighton the route recommended follows westerly in Columbia 
Street an,d Commonwealth Avenue, in open cut in sand and gravel 
at a depth of 20 feet, for a distance of 1,255 feet to near Allston 
Street. Beyond Allston Street the construction will enter rock 
tunnel about 60 feet below the surface, extending along Common- 
wealth Avenue and Warren, Cambridge and Washington streets for 
a distance of 5,100 feet to near Parsons Street ; thence continuing 
in Washington Street to near Lake Street in earth tunnel at a depth 
of 30 feet below the surface, for a distance of 1,100 feet. 

A 20-inch by 26-inch branch line in rock tunnel through Cam- 
bridge Street from Saunders Street, and a 24-inch by 28-inch branch 
line in sand and gravel open cut and in tunnel partly in earth and 
partly in rock through Market Street from Mapleton Street will 
enter the main sewer at Warren and Washington streets, respectively, 
reaching out to the northerly border of the high-level district. 

Beyond Lake Street the sewer will be constructed in open cut at 
a depth of 18 feet, generally in sand and gravel, for a distance of 
500 feet ; thence continuing in Washington Street in shallower open 
cut for a distance of 1,200 feet, necessitating the introduction of 
60-inch cast-iron pipe in place of the usual masonry sewer. From 
this section of iron pipe the line recommended continues in open 
cut at an average depth of 22 feet for a distance of 1,893 feet 



192 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

through Washington Street to Oak Square and through Tremont 
Street ; thence partly in rock and partly in earth open cut for a 
distance of 660 feet bo the Brighton-Newton boundary line, where 
the size will be reduced t<> 5 feet by 5 feet 3 inches. 

In New ton the route will follow along Tremont Street in rock 
tunnel for a distance of 2,060 feet; and thence in earth and rock 
cut for a distance of 640 feet through Tremont, Park and Vernon 
streets. Beyond this point, for a distance of 1,650 feet, 60-inch 
cast-iron pipe will be introduced in Vernon and Eldredge streets, 
private land, Hollis and Centre streets to near Mt. Ida Street. 
Beyond the iron pipe, for a distance of 348 feet in Mt. Ida Street 
to Xewtonville Avenue, the usual masonry sewer will be constructed 
in sand and gravel. From Newton ville Avenue westerly the sewer 
will be located in rock tunnel under Mt. Ida at a maximum depth 
of 150 feet, largely under private land and in Lewis Street to near 
East Side Parkway, a distance of 2,450 feet. Through Cabot Park 
the route will follow in open cut at an average depth of 12 feet for 
a distance of 402 feet to Laundry Brook. Beyond the brook a 
section of 60-inch cast-iron pipe will extend for a distance of 1,400 
feet through private land, Norwood Avenue, Harvard Street and 
Washington Park ; followed by a 5-foot by 5-foot 3-inch masonry 
sewer at a depth of about 15 feet through Washington Park to Wal- 
nut Street, a distance of 1,390 feet. Beyond Washington Park the 
sewer will be reduced to 4 feet 3 inches by 4 feet 6 inches, and will 
continue through Walnut Street and Highland Avenue, Elmwood 
Avenue and Austin Street in sand and gravel at an average depth 
of 14 feet, for a distance of 1,908 feet. From this point the sewer 
will enter rock tunnel at a depth of 25 feet below the surface for a 
distance of 1,324 feet through Austin and Mt. Vernon streets, Clark 
Place and private land ; thence in rock and earth cut at an average 
depth of 14 feet through private lands along the Boston & Albany 
Railroad and Margin Street to near Putnam Street, a distance of 
3,125 feet. From Putnam Street the route recommended follows 
through Margin, Lincoln and Washington streets in sand and gravel 
cut about 13 feet deep for a distance of 1,825 feet to Cheesecake 
Brook at Auburn Street. The sew r er will cross Cheesecake Brook 
by a 36-inch cast-iron pipe siphon. Beyond the brook the sewer 
will be reduced in size to 4 feet in diameter, and will continue in 
Washington Street in sand and gravel cut at an average depth of 16 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 193 

feet to near Greenough Street, a distance of 1,325 feet. At this 
point the sewer will enter rock tunnel under Washington Street at 
an average depth of about 50 feet below the surface and extend for 
a distance of 6,000 feet ; thence through an earth tunnel for a dis- 
tance of 1,357 feet to the Newton main sewer in Newton Lower 
Falls near the corner of Washington Street and Quinobequin Road, 
the end of the proposed High-level Sewer extension. 

Estimate of Cost. 

The following is an estimate of the cost of constructing an exten- 
sion of the High-level Sewer from the corner of Centre and Perkins 
streets, Jamaica Plain, over the route shown on the general map and 
outlined in the foregoing description : — 



194 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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WATKK AM) SEWERAGE BOARD. [P.D. 57. 

This estimate of cost is based upon the provision that in the air 
tunnels the masonry sections shall be of rings of Portland brickwork 
s inches and 12 inches in thickness; that the arches of the rock tun- 
nels shall be lined with Portland concrete, and the inverts shall be 
paved with a 4-inch lining of Portland brickwork, reinforced with 
Portland concrete; that in the rock and earth sections in the open 
cut trenches the arches shall be of brick, laid in Rosendale cement 
in dry around and in Portland cement where water is encountered, 
and the inverts shall be lined with 4 inches of Portland brickwork, 
reinforced with Portland concrete; and that the cast-iron pipe sec- 
tion- shall be entirely surrounded by Portland concrete. 

From the fore<roin<x table it appears that the construction of the 
proposed extension from the junction with the High-level Sewer 
near the corner of Centre and Perkins streets, Jamaica Plain, to Oak 
Square in Brighton, the part which is needed at the earlier date, is 
estimated to cost $1, 1 (58,928 ; that the construction of the remainder 
of the sewer, from Oak Square to the end at Xewton Lower Falls, 
is estimated to cost $720,978 ; and that the cost of the entire exten- 
sion over the route recommended is estimated at $1,889,906. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. M. BROWN, 

Engineer Sewerage Works. 
Boston, January 1, 1905. 




325 300 tf5 SO Z15 

PROFILE OF EXTENSION OF HIGH LEVEL SEWEPl 

Elevations are referred to a datum which is 100 & feet below mean low warer of Boston Harbor aril 100 feet below Boston Cih) Bose 



SCALE OF PROFILE 



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NOTES 

South Metropolitan Sewers indicated thus 
High Level Sewer Extension indicated thus 

North Metropolitan and Boston Main 
Drainage Sewers indicated thus ■■■■ I ) 



Newton Main Sewers indicated thus «■■■ — 1/ ^ 

Area tributary to High Level Sewer j 

bq gravitq shaded thus 

Area tributary to High Level Sewer 
bq pumping shaded thus 





'.■'■*'? 



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TS 




COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

miwoljw mm m sewerage board 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM 

WITH EXTENSION OF HIGH LEVEL SEWER 
ABOVE JAMAICA PLAIN 

Jan. 1,1905 



o 4 



SCALE OF MILES 



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r-ZZO 
E-210 

=-190 



160 
E-150 

140 
E-130 

120 




550 



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SIPHON 



1900 



I : 2500 



5Z5 



500 



475 



450 



4Z5 



400 



375 



350 3Z5 300 Z75 

PROFILE OF EXTENSION OF HIG 

Elevations are referred to a datum which is 100% feet below mean low warer 



I MILE 

SCALE OF PROFILE 




BMKHTffiET 



I 



Jan. 1,1905 



SCALE OF MILES 



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mmbtoit 



TREMONT ST.- 



WASHINGTON ST.- 



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S-|ttARREN ST.^-|— |cOUJMBIAJ|wiNCHESTERJ[pARK ST. -j|J- 1 ^- ^|||- g-|jf 



CHESTNUT -A- PERKINS ST. 



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EXISTING HIGH LEVEL SEWER 
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190^ 



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160- 

150- 
MO - 
130 -E 
IZO-^ 



ION OF HIGH LEVEL SEWER 

neon low warer of Boston Harbor and 



feet below Boston City Base 



I MILE 

OF PROFILE 



6000 

=£5= 



8000 FT. 



GEO. H. WALKER t CO. BOSTON 



e3T0H 

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APPENDIX. 



200 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 1 . 



Contracts made and tending during 
Contracts relating to the 

[Note. — The details of contracts made before 





1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 


2. 

WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. - 


1 

2 
3 
4 

5 


210f 
257 

264f 
268 1 

277f 


Excavating soil, . 

Excavating soil, . 

Arch bridges and abut- 
ments. 

Placing riprap on the west- 
erly portion of the North 
Dike. 

Masonry arch bridge, West 
Boylston, Mass. 


3 

6 
8 
-1 

8 


$377,830 00 

449,300 00 

42,470 00 

-t 

14,820 00 


$360,870 00* 

414,987 50* 

37,335 00* 

-t 

12,888 00* 


Newell & Snowllng Con- 
struction Company. 

Bruno, Salomone & 
Petitti. 

The George M. Atkins 
Company. 

The McArthur Brothers 
Company. 

F. A. McCauliff, Fitch- 
burg, Mass. 



Contracts relating to the 



6 


195 


7 


245 


8 


263f 


9 


275f 


10 


276f 


11 


278 f 


12 


279f 



Wachusett Dam, 

Section 2 of relocation of 
Central Massachusetts 
Railroad (extension of 
Contract No. 195) . 

Sluice valves for Wachu- 
sett Dam. 

South Dike of Wachusett 
Reservoir. 

Superstructure of lower 
gate-chamber of Wachu- 
sett Dam. 

Bronze grooves for Wachu- 
sett Dam. 



Valves for Wachusett 
Dam; 4 36-inch, 1 20- 
inch, 1 12-inch, 1 10-inch. 



11 

-t 

-J 
4 

7 

-t 



$1,680,870 00 


-X 


-X 


124,285 00 


76,563 00 


-t 


2,345 00 



$1,603,635 00* 


-X 


7,887 00 


118,570 00* 


72,595 00* 


3,691 00 


2,317 67* 



McArthur Brothers 
Company. 

McArthur Brothers 
Company. 



Coffin Valve Company, 

John F. Magee & Co., . 

Connery & Wentworth, 
Boston, Mass. 

The Wm. Cramp & Sons 
Ship and Engine 
Building Company, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Chapman Valve Manu- 
facturing Company, 
Indian Orchard, Mass. 



* Contract based upon this bid. f Contract completed. 

X Competitive bids were not received on this contract. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



201 



Appendix No . 1 . 



the Year 1904 — Water Works. 
Reservoir Department. 

1904 have been given in previous reports.] 



7. 

Date 
of Contract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion of 

Work. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1904. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31,1904. 



Aug. 1, '01, 
Dec. 27, '02, 
April 16, '03, 
May 16, '03, 

June 23, '04, 



Nov. 26, '04, 

Dec, 23, '03, 
Nov. 18, '04, 

Sept. 28, '04, 



For Portland cement concrete masonry, 
cu. yd.; ashlar masonry, $16 per cu. yd. 



.75 per 



$395,092 50 

450,000 00 

38,528 22 

51,017 50 

12,809 65 



$947,447 87 



Dam and Aqueduct Department. 



Oct. 1, 


'00, 


April 18, 


'02, 


April 30, 


'03, 


Dec. 26, 


'03, 


Mar. 18, 


'04, 


May 25, 


'04, 


July 15, 


'04, 



— 




April 7, 


'04, 


Dec. 8, 


'04, 


Dec. 22, 


'04, 


Aug. 8, 


'04, 


Dec. 16, 


'04, 



For whole work, $72,595, 



For whole work, $3,691, 



For whole work, $2,317.67, 



1,454,340 00 


6 


256,439 34 


7 


7,887 00 


8 


139,411 04 


9 


72,937 34 


10 



3,691 00 



2,317 67 



11 



12 



202 



MKTROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc 



Contracts made and pending during the 
Contracts relating to the 





1. 

Num- 
ber 
of (.'on- 
tract. 


2. 
WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount 


of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 
•J 


280t 
281f 


:U.T40 lbs. castings 
"W'achusett Dam. 

76,945 lbs. castings 
W'achusett Dam. 

Total, . 


for 
for 


6 
6 


$1,346 17 
2,596 89 


$1,215 90* 
2,431 46* 


Davis & Farnum Manu- 
facturing Company, 
Waltbam, Mass. 

Gibby Foundry Com- 
pany, Boston, Mass. 



Contracts relating to the 



3 


199t 


Section 2, Weston Aque- 
duct. 


8 


$234,581 50 


$200,477 00* 


Shanahan, Casparis & 
Co. 


4 


200t 


Section 3, Weston Aque- 
duct. 


9 


131,226 10 


127,507 50* 


Shanahan, Casparis & 
Co. 


5 


203f 


Section 6, Weston Aque- 
duct. 


14 


121,497 00 


120,646 50* 


Shanahan, Casparis & 
Co. 


6 


204t 


Section 12, Weston Aque- 
duct. 


16 


139,197 50 


134,096 50* 


Shanahan, Casparis & 
Co. 


7 


205f 


8ection 13, Weston Aque- 
duct. 


9 


364,884 00 


346,290 00* 


Michael H. Keefe, as- 
signed on Oct. 12, 1901, 
to Columbus Con- 
struction Company. 


8 


211| 


Sections 8 and 10, Weston 
Aqueduct. 


11 


155,508 50 


146,139 00* 


Winston & Co., 


9 


212t 


Section 11, Weston Aque- 
duct. 


10 


157,270 00 


148,635 00* 


Winston & Co., . 


10 


213t 


Section 15, Weston Aque- 
duct. 


5 


197,556 00 


171,645 00* 


Winston & Co., 


11 


218f 


Section 14, Weston Aque- 
duct. 


10 


68,364 00 


58,490 00* 


Nawn & Brock, 


12 


219t 


Section 1 of the Weston 
Reservoir. 


11 


64,971 25 


59,587 50* 


Nawn & Brock, 


13 


220 f 


Section 2 of the Weston 
Reservoir. 


9 


90,152 50 


88,292 50* 


Nawn & Brock, 


14 


267f 


Superstructures of channel, 
and screen chambers of 
the Weston Aqueduct. 


7 


12,475 00* 


9,150 §0 


Woodbury & Leighton 
Company. 


15 


271f 


Superstructures of head 
and meter chambers of 
the Weston Aqueduct. 


5 


12,325 00 


10,804 00* 

1 


C. A. Dodge & Com- 
pany. 



Contracts relating to the 



235f Laying water pipes in New- 6 

ton. 



Total, 



$53,121 75 



$50,976 00* 



D. F. O'Connell, . 



* Contract based upon this bid. 



t Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



203 



Year 1904 — Water Works — Continued. 
Dam and Aqueduct Department — Concluded. 



7. 

Date 
of Contract. 


8. 

Date of 

Completion of 

Work. 


9. 

Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1904. 


10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 1904. 




Aug. 12, '04, 
Aug. 12, '04, 


Dec. 20, '04, 
Dec. 31, '04, 


For all castings, $0.0316 per lb., .... 


$1,248 97 
2,536 63 


1 

2 




$1,940,808 99 





Weston Aqueduct Department. 



May 


9, 


'01, 


May 


9, 


'01, 


May 


9, 


'01, 


May 


9, 


'01, 


May 


20, 


'01, 


Aug. 


28, 


'01, 


Aug. 


28, 


'01, 


Aug. 


28, 


'01, 


Nov. 


26, 


'01, 


Nov. 


26, 


'01, 


Nov. 


26, 


'01, 


June 


4, 


'03, 


July 


6, 


'03, 



Oct. 


9, 


'03, 


Oct. 


9, 


'03, 


Sept. 


26, 


'03, 


Oct. 


7, 


'03, 


Nov. 


11, 


'03, 


Nov. 


21, 


'03, 


Nov. 


14, 


'03, 


Nov. 


28, 


'03, 


May 


20, 


'04, 


May 


20, 


'04, 


May 


20, 


'04, 


Apri 


1 8, 


'04, 


Nov. 


28, 


'03, 



$205,159 54 

131,062 48 

116,641 31 

142,021 5.5 

417,252 64 

150,101 77 

159,892 59 

183,374 58 

59,449 04 

63,778 33 

123,970 70 

12,484 75 

10,804 00 



$1,775,993 28 



Distribution Department. 



April 7, '02, 



April 21, '03, 



$71,287 87 



ri,287 87 



204 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1904 — Waterworks — 

Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts.* 



Value of Work 
done Decem- 
ber 31, 1904. 



Waehusott Reservoir, 6 contracts, 

Relocation of Central Massachusetts Railroad, 1 contract, . 

Waehuaett Dam, 7 contracts, 

Weston Aqueduct and Reservoir, 13 contracts, 

Distribution Department, 1 contract, 

Total of 28 contracts made and pending during the year 1904, 

248 contracts completed from 1896 to 1903, inclusive, 

Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts'by the city of Boston, . 
Total of 287 contracts, 

* In this summary, contracts charged to maintenance are excluded. 



$1,086,858 91 

256,439 34 

1,544,958 61 

1,775,993 28 

71,287 87 



$4,735,538 01 
10,525,722 64 



$15,261,260 65 
512,000 00 

$14,749,260 65 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 205 



Appendix No. 2. 



Cement Tests — Water Works. 

The following tables contain : — 

1. Long-time tests of natural cements used by the Dam and Aqueduct, 
and Reservoir departments during the years 1896 to 1900, inclusive. 

2. Long-time tests of Portland cements used by the Dam and Aqueduct, 
and Reservoir departments during the years 1896 to 1900, inclusive. 

3. Tests of cements used in the construction of the Wachusett Dam and 
other works at the Wachusett Reservoir during the years 1901 to 1904, 
inclusive. 

4. Tests of cements used in the construction of the Weston Aqueduct 
during^the years 1901 to 1903, inclusive. 

The methods of testing were the same as described in Appendix No. 3 
of the annual report of the year 1897. 



206 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Summary oj Tests of All Brands of Natural Cement, of which Nine 

Aqueduct and Reservoir Departments 



r. II AND. 



Number 

of Barrels 

used. 



Composition 

of 

Briquette. 



Beach, . 
Hoffman,. 

Norton 

Union, . 
Total, 



8,380 

45,345 

60,877 

900 



Neat, 
1 tol, 
Neat, 
1 to 1, 
Neat, 
1 tol, 
( Neat, 
1 tol, 



115,502 



Neat, 
ltol, 



Tensile Strength. 



TWO TEARS. 



Number of 
Briquettes. 



64 
64 
106 
106 
60 
60 
22 
22 



252 
252 



Pounds per 
Square Inch. 



467 
316 

467 
327 
440 
295 
409 
570 



456 
338 



Summary of Tests of All Brands of Portland Cement, of which Nine 

Aqueduct and Reservoir Departments 



BRAND. 



Number 

of Barrels 

used. 



Composition 

of 

Briquette. 



Atlas, 

Brooks-Shoobridge, 
Giant, 
Iron Clad, 
Stettin-Girstow, 
West Kent, 
Total, 



18,509 
5,706 

15,394 

7,778 

979 

3,394 



51,760 



( Neat, 

( 2 to 1, 

( Neat, 

I 2 to 1, 

Neat, 

2 tol, 

Neat, 

2 to 1, 

( Neat, 

(2 to 1, 

Neat, 

2 tol, 



Neat, 
2 to 1, 



Tensile Strength. 



EIGHTEEN MONTHS. 



Number of 
Briquettes. 



65 

65 

5 

5 

55 

55 

34 

34 

8 

8 

19 

19 



186 
186 



Pounds per 
Square Inch. 



848 
324 
674 
521 
598 
426 
769 
396 
665 
370 
586 
522 



721 
395 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



207 



Hundred Barrels or More were used on Construction Work by the Dam and 
from 1896 to 1900, inclusive. 



Tensile Strength — Concluded. 




THREE 


YEARS. 


FIVE TEARS. 


SEVEN AND ONE-HALF YEARS. 




Number of 
Briquettes. 


Pounds per 
Square Inch. 


Number of 
Briquettes. 


Pounds per 
Square Inch. 


Number of 
Briquettes. 


Pounds per 
Square Inch. 




50 


482 


23 


506 


10 


462 


i> 


50 


349 


24 


369 


10 


420 


91 


495 


51 


514 


10 


468 


!• 


91 


347 


51 


364 


10 


357 


54 


456 


28 


479 


3 


452 


)■ 


54 


314 


27 


325 


3 


371 


10 


474 


4 


476 


3 


485 


!• 


10 


617 


4 


576 


3 


551 


205 


480 


106 


501 


26 


465 




205 


352 


106 


363 


26 


405 





Hundred Barrels or More were used on Construction Work by the Dam and 
from 1896 to 1900, Inclusive. 



Tensile Strength — Concluded. 




TWO YEARS. 


THREE 


YEARS. 


FIVE YEARS. 


SEVEN AND ONE- 
HALF YEARS. 




Number 

of 

Briquettes. 


Pounds 

per Square 

Inch. 


Number 

of 

Briquettes. 


Pounds 

per 8quare 

Inch. 


Number 

of 

Briquettes. 


Pounds 

per Square 

Inch. 


; Number 

of 
Briquettes. 


Pounds 

per Square 

Inch. 




80 


813 


64 


814 


• 38 


794 


7 


1,034 


jl 


80 


325 


64 


336 


38 


307 


7 


495 


55 


702 


53 


696 


30 


698 


13 


672 


[2 


55 


447 


53 


449 


30 


443 


13 


448 


55 


622 


45 


618 


24 


633 


2 


727 


[3 


55 


422 


45 


414 


24 


401 


2 


497 


34 


800 


26 


826 


18 


838 


2 


698 


( 4 


34 


394 


26 


378 


18 


369 


2 


378 


51 


714 


42 


709 


22 


695 


10 


684 


[5 


53 


340 


42 


332 


21 


300 


10 


363 


59 


589 


51 


570 


29 


562 


17 


548 


I 6 


59 


434 


51 


424 


29 


391 


17 


409 


334 


707 


281 


701 


161 


702 


51 


686 




336 


389 


281 


389 


157 


365 


51 


424 





208 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Summary of Tests of Cement used in the Construction of the Wachusett Dam 





BRAND. 


Number op 

Barrels 

used. 


o of Briquette. 


Fineness. 


Wire 

Tests. 


Tensile 
Strength. 








<s > 
v <x> 


a) « 


%?2 




a 
=0 > 


ONE DAT. 




■ 

0v 


— 











o 


&m~ 


_-~a£ 




23 

■ 

s 

a 

a 


OS 

a> 


o« 


- c 
<u 1— 






a 

Q 


i 

"3 
o 


O 
C 

a 

o 


IS 

tf O 4> 

O O) W 

5fca5 


© « 

rji<q es 

J- a Or? 


:jfc© « 
-r 3 

S OCO0L 




a 


? 3 

s 


• s 

•a § 

3 & 






< 


C-l 


O 


cu 


£ 


dl 


a 


i 


fe 


Ph 




Portland cement : — 






















1 


Alpha, . 


150 


491 


I Neat, . 
/ 2tol, . 


.4 


10.9 


28.6 


158 


347 

316 


47 


694 


2 


Alsen, . 


225 


355 


( Neat, . 
\ 2tol,. 


.4 


11.2 


26.4 


116 


291 
306 


31 


625 


3 


Atlas, . 


3,064 


3,763 


\ Neat, .• 
1 2 to 1 , . 


.2 


9.0 


22.4 


113 


354 

287 


207 


571 


4 


Catskill, 


- 


305 


( Neat, . 
} 2tol, . 


.4 


7.0 


22.3 


130 


300 
298 


10" 


476 


5 


Giant, . 


62,659 


65,641 


1 Neat, . 
| 2 tol,. 


.5 


9.5 


23.0 


138 


379 

378 


3,810 


590 


6 


Helderberg, . 


200 


212 


{ Neat, . 
/ 2tol, . 


.2 


5.0 


19.9 


173 


480 
450 


23 


383 


7 


Iron Clad, . 


4,260 


4,540 


( Neat, . 
} 2tol,. 


.1 


4.2 


17.1 


86 


304 
293 


222 


652 


8 


Lehigh, 


4,140 


10,733 


( Neat, . 
\ 2tol,. 


.1 


8.2 


22.0 


217 


484 
481 


960 


531 


9 


Star, . 


- 


1,200 


\ Neat, . 
) 2 to 1, . 


.5 


9.8 


24.4 


154 


336 
356 


51 


691 


10 


Stettin-Girstow, . 


- 


2,200 


i Neat, . 
j2tol,. 


.7 


8.3 


21.3 


62 


178 
351 


252 


377 


11 


Whitehall, . 
Total, . 


150 


150 


1 Neat, . 
|2tol,. 


.3 


8.3 


27.5 


180 


360 
450 


20 


736 




74,848 


89,590 


( Neat, . 
|2tol,. 


1.8 


10.7 


22.5 


142 


380 
381 


5,633 


574 




Natural cement : — 






























( Neat, . 
\ ltol, . 
(2tol,. 


1.0 


6.3 


13.7 


66 


133 


6,689 


174 


12 


Union, . 


175,060 


175,060 


- 


- 


- 


57 


112 


- 


- 










- 


~ 


- 


•* 


~ 


~ 


m 



Summary of Tests of Cements used in the Construction 



13 
14 
15 
16 


Portland cement : — 
Atlas, . 

Giaut, . 

Saylor's, 
Lehigh, 

Total, . 

Natural cement: — 
Hoffman, 

Union, . 
Total, 


- 


91,875 
7,653 
2,200 
5,160 


I Neat, . 
>2tol,. 

Neat, . 

moi,. 

j Neat, . 

\ 2tol,. 

Neat, . 

\ 2 to 1, . 

( Neat, . 
| 2 to 1, . 

( Neat, . 

/ltol, . 

Neat, . 

\ ltol,. 

\ Neat, . 
f ltol, . 


.2 
.3 
.2 
.1 

.2 

1.1 

1.0 


9.4 
9.5 
6.2 
9.7 

.9.4 

6.8 
6.8 


20.0 
20.7 
18.0 
20.8 

20.0 
•l3Tl 


58 

69 

161 

134 


331 
417 
303 
366 
479 
544 
344 
515 


4,356 
430 
127 
207 


423 
420 
214 
374 


17 

18 


- 


106,888 

98,347 
14,738 


65 

27 
26 
40 

27 

29 
26 


333 
420 

61 
63 
90 
73 

65 
64 


5,120 

4,485 
832 


415 

138 
157 




- 


113,085 


1.1 


6.8 


5,317 


141 



No. 57. n 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



209 



and Other Works at the Wachusett Reservoir, 1901 to 1904, Inclusive. 



Tensile Strength — Concluded. 




SEVEN 
DAYS. 


TWENTY- 
EIGHT DATS. 


THREE 
MONTHS. 


SIX 
MONTHS. 


NINE | 
MONTHS. 


ONE 
TEAR. 


EIGHTEEN 
MONTHS. 


TWO 
TEARS. 


THREE 
TEARS. 




og 
ffi 

3 
23 


a 

■- a 

3 ^ 

0-i 


EC 
3) 

°3 

3 

23 


t> 

i- a 

12 3 

Ph 


to 
09 

£> - 

- 
1* 


,q 
o 

■~ a 

0>l-H 

& a> 

3 * 

Ph 


o 

**h Tl 

3 

23 


J3 

a 

■~ a 

3^ 

Ph 


i, 

sir 

& •- 

3 

23 


o 

■~ a 

3^ 

o«2 

Ph 


DC 

o| 

SPh 

3 

23 


o 

■~ a 

IO HH 
— a) 

T3 2 
3^ 

Ph 


0) 

SP5 

3 

23 


,3 
o 

u a 

<o >— 1 
73 3 

S o< 
Sec 

Ph 


m 

sir 

& '** 

£Ph 

3 

25 


i- a 

(U-H 

•3 2 

3 & 

Ph 


m 

°§ 

a* 
g pa 

3 

23 


u C 
o >— 
&c 4; 

■o 2 

3^ 

Oh 




47 

47 

32 

32 

206 

207 

10 

10 

3,750 

3,814 

23 

23 

218 

218 

959 

959 

51 

51 

251 

250 

20 

20 


1,021 
474 
776 
373 
837 
384 
855 
393 
860 
403 
843 
301 
700 
403 
871 
396 
927 
433 
475 
281 
946 
434 

839 
396 

225 
185 
116 


5 

5 

15 

15 

167 

167 

10 

10 

3,533 

3,536 

23 

23 

221 

222 

591 

591 

28 

28 

251 

252 

13 

13 


1,026 
428 
753 
433 
848 
450 
903 
477 
887 
450 
933 
409 
712 
451 
879 
499 
924 
428 
538 
378 
970 
478 


5 
5 
5 
5 
20 
20 

290 

290 

5 

5 

25 

25 

20 

20 

15 

15 

5 

5 


1,029 
445 
761 
413 
801 
444 

864 
455 
906 
377 
714 
474 
897 
447 

597 
448 
996 
474 


5 
5 
5 
5 
20 
20 

285 

285 

5 

5 

25 

25 

15 

15 

15 
15 

5 
5 


1,091 
405 
834 
447 
848 
445 

898 
450 
881 
380 
788 
486 
907 
481 

664 
496 
971 
445 


5 
5 

5 

5 

20 

20 

285 

265 

5 

5 

25 

25 

15 

15 

15 

15 

5 

5 


1,063 
452 
723 
380 
823 
459 

879 
445 
872 
402 
769 
497 
927 
426 

692 
486 
874 
431 


5 
5 
5 
5 
20 
20 

215 

210 

5 

5 

25 

25 

• 15 

15 

15 
15 

5 
5 

310 

305 

230 
230 
170 


1,015 
406 
813 
393 
899 
422 

893 
435 

897 
386 
807 
488 
898 
456 

709 

486 

1,047 

352 

881 
439 

437 
553 
421 


5 
5 
5 
5 
20 
20 

190 

190 

5 

5 

25 

25 

5 

5 

15 
15 

270 
270 


1,029 
340 
825 
381 
873 
404 

911 

409 
870 
389 
885 
505 
1,074 
426 

728 
481 

899 
419 


5 
5 
5 
5 
15 
15 

145 

145 

5 

5 

25 

25 

5 

5 

205 

205 

160 

160 

94 


1,034 

320 
824 
382 
833 
393 

881 
408 
896 
372 
851 
504 
1,050 
447 

88] 
416 

484 
624 
461 


100 
100 

100 
100 

65 
65 


920 
377 

920 
377 

500 
660 


j 1 
2 

i 3 

i 4 
5 

6 

7 

i 8 

1 9 
10 

! n 


5,567 
5,631 

6,684 
6,664 
1,360 


4,857 
4,862 

2,548 
2,540 
1,307 


859 
452 

298 
278 
197 


390 
390 

345 

345 
275 


845 
453 

358 
411 

290 


380 
380 

310 
310 

230 


882 
453 

405 
490 
382 


380 
360 


864 
449 


}. 



o/£fte Weston Aqueduct, 1901 to 1904, Inclusive. 



- ) 



4,346 


664 


2,266 


718 


490 


745 


275 


757 






183 


750 


93 


741 


39 


832 


9 


876 


4,169 


284 


3,141 


401 


523 


470 


291 


446 


- 


- 


191 


402 


90 


405 


58 


398 


10 


406 


431 


659 


228 


707 


98 


762 


82 


764 


- 


- 


66 


759 


25 


808 


12 


835 


- 


- 


405 


323 


268 


402 


102 


482 


89 


476 


- 


- 


91 


449 


23 


433 


15 


436 


- 


- 


130 


719 


104 


792 


73 


780 


85 


830 


- 


_ 


65 


822 


34 


830 


29 


848 


- 


- 


127 


269 


103 


398 


67 


410 


78 


397 


- 


- 


61 


350 


24 


449 


38 


340 


- 


- 


210 


639 


169 


730 


64 


744 


49 


765 


- 


- 


48 


769 


20 


827 


10 


971 


- 


- 


208 


314 

664 


166 


455 


68 

725 


491 

750 


49 


490 







50 

362 


418 

767 


20 
172 


433 

778 


10 

90 


434 

853 


9 


876 


5,117 


2,767 


721 


491 


772 


4,909 


288 


3,678 


403 


760 


468 


507 


448 


- 


- 


393 


418 


157 


419 


121 


388 


10 


406 


4,474 


164 


2,569 


253 


220 


320 


159 


355 






186 


350 


92 


380 


58 


369 


5 


340 


4,415 


128 


2,586 


242 


217 


335 


168 


383 


- 


- 


146 


355 


99 


349 


51 


333 


5 


305 


833 


205 


409 


269 


63 


312 


52 


356 


- 


- 


32 


394 


25 


402 


15 


404 


- 


- 


833 


174 


431 


246 


69 

283 


345 

318 


51 
211 


395 
355 







30 
218 


467 

357 


20 
117 


501 



378 


15 
1 

73 


541 

376 


5 


340 


5,307 


170 


2,978 


255 


5,248 


136 


3,017 


242 


286 


338 


219 


386 


- 


- 


176 


374 


119 


374 


66 


380 


5 


305 



13 
14 
15 
16 



17 

18 



210 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc, 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



211 



Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1904. 



Day of Month. 


>> 

u. 
S3 

a 

SS 


>> 

5 


u 

tm 


a. 


3 


o 

a 
a 
<-r> 


'a 


go 

3 
be 

D 
< 


u 

O 
S 


C 

<u 
fit 
o 

o 
O 


3 

g 

CO 

> 
o 


u 

<u 

fit 

a 

o 

a> 




1. 










- 


- 


0.57t 


0.90} 


- 


- 


0.50 


* 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


2, 










* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


* 


0.10 


0.54 


0.04 


- 


- 


- 


3, 

4, 
5, 










0.85+ 


- 


0.75} 


- 


- 


0.52 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.12 


2.03 


- 


- 


* 


- 


0.12} 


6, 










- 


0.30f 


- 


- 


- 


* 


- 


- 


- 


0.22 


- 


- 


7, 










- 


0.13 


* 


0.35 


- 


1.28 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8, 










* 


- 


1.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.27 


* 


0.08 


- 


0.03+ 


9, 










0.30f 


- 


- 


* 


0.63 


- 


- 


- 


* 


- 


- 


- 


10, 










- 


- 


- 


1.21 


* 


- 


- 


* 


0.37 


- 


- 


- 


11, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


0.25 


- 


- 


0.92 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12, 










- 


- 


- 


0.21 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.40 


- 


* 


13, 










0.85} 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.08 


- 


- 


- 


* 


0.50+ 


14, 










- 


* 


- 


- 


* 


- 


- 


0.11 


* 


- 


1.30} 


- 


15, 










- 


0.28} 


0.05f 


- 


0.15 


- 


- 


- 


4.09 


- 


- 


- 


16, 










0.21| 


- 


- 


0.35} 


- 


0.07 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


* 


18, 










- 


- 


0.38f 


- 


* 


- 


0.75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.38+ 


19, 










- 


0.20f 


* 


0.05f 


0.63 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20, 










0.15f 


- 


0.15 


- 


0.25 


- 


- 


1.70 


- 


- 


- 


- 


21, 










* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.10 


- 


0.04+ 


22, 










* 


1.00 


* 


- 


- 


- 


* 


- 


- 


0.05 


- 


- 


23, 










1.25} 


- 


0.15 


- 


- 


- 


* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


24, 










- 


0.38} 


- 


- 


- 


- 


* 


- 


0.23 


- 


- 


- 


25, 










- 


- 


- 


0.07 


0.08 


0.09 


0.75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.16f 


26, 










0.68+ 


- 


- 


* 


0.52 


- 


- 


- 


0.13 


0.07 


- 


* 


27, 










- 


- 


- 


* 


0.60 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.03} 


* 


28, 










- 


0.23} 


- 


* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.75} 


29, 










* 


0.28f 


- 


4.07 


- 


* 


0.55 


- 


0.73 


- 


* 


- 


30, 










0.24} 


- 


- 


0.04 


0.32 


1.70 


- 


- 


0.13 


- 


0.25 


- 


31, 










- 


- 


0.45} 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.92 


- 


- 


T< 


Mai, 




4.53 


2.80 


3.50 


7.25 


3.43 


3.78 


4.76 


3.54 


5.72 


1.58 


2.98 



Total for the year, 45.79 inches. 
* Rainfall included in that of following day. + Snow. 



} Rain and snow. 



•2 1 2 



M KTKOPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 8. — Raivfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1904. 



Pay or Month. 


h 

as 

□ 
•"5 


it 

a 

3 


o 

fa 

i 




06 


0J 

□ 
P 
■■5 


>> 

3 


«4 
00 

3 

M 

3 

< 


h 
<u 
X> 

S 

B 

a 

QQ 


la 
V 

.o 

3 

o 




November. 1 


Im 

o 
X) 

a 

■ 

a> 

Q 


I, 








- 


- 


O.lCf 


0.98 


0.01 


- 


0.04 


* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


•> 
-i 








* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


* 


0.02 


0.85 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3, 








1.261 


- 


0.49} 


- 


- 


0.31 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4, 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.02 


- 


- 


- 


5, 








- 


* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.43 


0.02 


- 


* 


- 


0.19} 


6, 








- 


0.39 J 


- 


- 


- 


* 


0.10 


- 


- 


0.16 


- 


- 


". 








- 


0.05 


0.79 


0.18 


- 


0.57 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8, 








* 


- 


- 


* 


- 


0.07 


- 


0.44 


0.29 


* 


- 


0.03} 


9, 








0.69} 


- 


- 


0.60 


0.88 


- 


- 


- 


0.06 


0.02 


0.02} 


. - 


10, 








- 


- 




1.22 


0.08 


- 


- 


0.45 


- 


0.03 


- 


- 


11, 








- 


- 




* 


- 


- 


- 


0.09 


* 


0.04 


- 


- 


12, 








- 


- 


- 


0.28 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.60 


* 


- 


* 


13, 








0.65} 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.15 


0.04 


- 


0.60 


1.55} 


0.42} 


14, 








- 


* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.23 


* 


- 


- 


- 


15, 








- 


0.50f 


0.18} 


* 


0.32 


- 


- 


- 


3.66 


- 


- 


- 


16, 








0.09} 


- 


- 


0.40} 


- 


- 


0.05 


0.18 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17, 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.01 


- 




- 


* 


18, 








- 


- 


0.41} 


- 


0.35 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.47} 


19, 








- 


0.20t 


0.07 


0.11} 


0.27 


- 


- 


* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20, 








0.06f 


- 


- 


0.03} 


0.02 


- 


- 


1.10 


- 


* 


0.03 


- 


21, 








* 


* 


- 


- 


- 


0.41 


- 


- 


- 


0.52 


- 


- 


22, 








* 


0.84 


0.01} 


- 


- 


- 


* 


- 


- ' 


- 


- 


- 


23, 








1.04| 


- 


0.20 


- 


0.02 


- 


* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


24, 








- 


0.35} 


- 


0.08 


- 


- 


* 


- 


0.14 


- 


- 


- 


25, 








- 


- 


- 


- 


0.02 


0.32 


0.64 


- 


- 


- 


- 


* 


26, 








0.67| 


- 


- 


* 


0.03 


- 


0.54 


- 


0.06 


0.14 


- 


0.12} 


27, 










- 


- 


* 


0.26 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.04} 


* 


28, 








- 


0.16 


- 


* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.78 


29, 








0.22f 


0.51} 


- 


4.88 


- 


- 


0.17 


- 


0.77 


- 


0.09 


- 


30, 








- 


- 


- 


0.02 


0.18 


1.02 


- 


- 


0.04 


- 


•- 


- 


31, 








0.02 


- 


0.38} 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


T 


Dtal, 


4.70 


3.00 


2.69 


8.78 


2.44 


2.70 


.2.14 


3.41 


5.64 


1.51 


1.73 


2.96 



Total for the year, 41.70 inches. 
* Rainfall included in that of following day. } Snow. 



} Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



213 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1904, 



Date. 


a 

3 
O 


u 

o . 


Duration. 


Date. 


a 
3 
o 


j-. 

o • 
a 

£•3 


Duration. 




a 


§tf 








a 


§tf 








«i 


0D 








< 


m 






Jan. 2, 


J 1.15 


Snow. 


7.10 a.m. to 




May 9, 


0.79 


Rain. 


6.10 a.m. to 


8.00 P.M. 


Jan. 3, 




10.30 p.m. 


May 10, 


0.14 


Rain. 


5.20 p.m. to 


6 30 P.M. 


Jan. 8, 
Jan. 9, 


j 1.09 


Snow. 


2.30 p.m. to 


3.30 P.M. 


May 15, 
May 18, 


0.24 
J 1.15 


Rain. 
Rain.* 


7.00 p.m. to 10.30 P.M. 
9.30 A.M. to 


Jan. 12, 


0.03 


Snow. 


7.00 a.m. to 


7.00 P.M. 


May 20, 




1.30 p.m. 


Jan. 13, 


1.18 


Snow and 


11.00 A.M. to 




May 25, 


0.28 


Rain .* 


7.00 p.m. to 


8.45 P.M. 






rain. 




10.45 P.M. 


May 27, 


0.40 


Rain* 


1.10 P.M. tO 


1.40 p M. 


Jan. 16, 


0.09 


Snow. 


3.20 p.m. to 


6.15 p.m. 


May 30, 


0.28 


Rain. 


2.40 p.m. to 


9.30 P.M. 


Jan. 20, 


0.08 


Snow. 


5.50 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. 
















Jan. 21, 


J 1.04 

0.10 


Snow and 


2.45 p.m. to 




Total, 


3.28 








Jan. 22, 


rain. 
Rain. 


1.45 p.m. to 


10.40 P.M. 
6.30 P.M. 












Jan. 23, 












Jan. 26, 


0.73 


Rain and 


3.45 p.m. to 




June 2, 


0.57 


Rain. 


12.25 p.m. to 


7.00 P.M. 






snow. 




10.50 P.M. 


June 7, 


0.50 


Rain.* 


3.15 a.m. to 


7.30 A.M. 


Jan. 29, 


0.15 


Snow. 


5.50 A.M. to 


8.00 P.M. 


June 7, 
June 8, 


J 0.05 


Rain. 


10.00 P.M. to 


2.00 a.m. 






Total, 


5.64 








Jnne 21, 
June 21, 
June 23, 


0.20 
J 0.10 


Rain.* 
Rain. 


1.20 p.m. to 
4.00 p.m. to 


1.40 P.M. 












12.45 A.M. 


Feb. 6, 


0.46 


Snow and 


1.00 A.M. tO 




June 25, 


0.30 


Rain* 


6.30 P.M. to 


9.00 p.m. 






rain. 




9.00 P.M. 


June 26, 


0.18 


Rain.* 


1.30 p.m. to 


2.40 P.M. 


Feb. 14, 
Feb. 15, 


J 0.77 


Snow. 


7.00 p.m. to 


5.30 p.m. 


June 28, 
June 30, 


J 0.85 


Rain. 


11.05 P.M. to 


11.45 P.M. 


Feb. 19, 


0.21 


Snow. 


6.10 A.M. tO 


5.45 P.M. 
















Feb. 21, 
Feb. 22. 


J 0.98 
0.33 


Rain. 
Snow. 


11.23 p.m. to 
4.30 A.M. to 


1.45 P.M. 
3.30 p.m. 


Total, 


2.75 








Feb. 24; 












Feb. 28, 


0.15 


Rain. 


2.00 P.M. to 


4.30 p.m. 


July 1, 


0.02 


Rain. 


7.00 A.M. to 


8.30 A.M. 


Mar. 1, 


0.06 


Rain and 


1.00 A.M. tO 




July 5, 


0.44 


Rain. 


4.20 p.m. to 


9.50 p.m. 






enow. 




7.00 A.M. 


July 13, 
July 17, 


0.09 
0.19 


Rain. 
Rain. 


5.55 A.M. to 11.40 A.M. 












7.30 p.m. to 


y.uu p.m. 


Total, 


2.96 








July 22, 
July 25, 
July 27, 


J 0.61 
0.06 


Rain. 
Rain. 


8.30 p.m. to 
2.00 A.M. to 


1.30 A.M. 












6.00 A.M. 


Mar. 1, 


0.15 


Snow. 


7.00 A.M. to 


4.30 p.m. 


July 29, 


0.07 


Rain. 


2.25 A.M. to 


3.35 A.M. 


Mar. 3, 
Mar. 7, 
Mar. 8, 


0.47 

J 0.96 

0.14 


Rain. 
Rain. 
Snow. 


5.00 A.M. to 8.15 P.M. 
5.45 P.M. to 

4.30 A.M. 
5.50 A.M. to 8.00 p.m. 












Total, 


1.48 








Mar. 15, 












Mar. 18, 


0.40 


Snow and 
rain. 


5.50 a.m. to 


5.30 P.M. 


Aug. 1, 
Aug. 3, 


J 0.96 


Rain. 


6.25 p.m. to 


8.00 A.M. 


Mar. 19, 


? 0.07 


Rain. 


8.30 p.m. to 




Aug. 6, 


0.19 


Rain. 


12.30 A.M. to 


4.15 A.M. 


Mar. 20, 






12.20 A.M. 


Aug. 8, 


0.03 


Rain. 


6.50 A.M. to 


8.30 A.M. 


Mar. 22, 


I 0.27 


Snow and 


6.05 a.m. to 




Aug. 11, 


0.41 


Rain. 


5.50 p.m. to 


5.55 p.m. 


Mar. 23, 




rain. 




9.45 A.M. 


Aug. 14, 


0.08 


Rain. 


1.05 A.M. tO 


3.00 P.M. 


Mar. 31, 


( 0.33 


Snow and 


5.35 p.m. to 




Aug. 16, 


0.04 


Rain. 


3.30 p.m. to 


6.00 P.M. 


Apr. 1, 




rain. 




7.00 A.M. 


Aug. 20, 
Aug. 21, 


j 1.03 


Rain. 


5.00 A.M. to 








2.30 A.M. 


Total, 


2.79 








Total, 












2.74 






1.01 


Rain. 


9.00 A.M. to 


6.10 P.M 




Apr. 1, 












Apr. 7, 


0.17 


Rain. 


7.50 A.M. to 


1.20 P.M. 


Sept. 4, 


0.02 


Rain. 


2.35 A.M. to 


3.25 A.M. 


Apr. 8, 
Apr. 10, 


( 1.42 


Rain.* 


9.25 p.m. to 


3.05 A.M. 


Sept. 8, 
Sept. 10, 


J 0.28 


Rain. 


7.00 P.M. to 


12.15 A.M. 


Apr. 11, 


0.06 


Rain. 


3.20 a.m. to 


5.05 A.M. 


Sept. 11, 
Sept. 12, 
Sept. 14, 
Sept. 15, 
Sept. 24, 
Sept. 26, 


i 




11.45 P.M. to 




Apr. 12, 


0.32 


Rain. 


5.00 a.m. to 10 45 a.m. 


> 0.51 


Rain. 




9.10 P.M. 


Apr. 16, 


0.38 


Snow. 


2.10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. 


i 




11.10 A.M. to 




Apr. 19, 


0.25 


Snow. 


5.15 p m. to 11.20 p.m. 


[ 3.84 


Rain. 




8.30 A.M. 


Apr. 24, 


0.10 


Rain. 


2.15 a.m. to 


5.45 AM. 


> 




8.30 p.m. to 




Apr. 26, 


0.10 


Rain. 


9.30 p.m. to 


7.00 A.M. 


> 0.30 


Rain. 




6.15 p.m. 


Apr. 27, 
Apr. 30, 


J5.37 


Rain.* 


7.00 A.M. to 


6.30 P M. 


Sept. 29, 
Sept. 30, 

Total, 


j 0.80 


Rain. 

i 


12.45 p.m. to 


1.15 P.M. 


Total, 


9.18 


5.75 





* Thunder shower. 



214 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 4. — Ruin/nil in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1904 — 

Concluded. 





a 


O • 










*a 

a 


M 

o • 






Date. 


a 


Duration. 


Date. 


a 
o 


*•§ 


Duration. 




B 


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2 


gtf 








< 


m 










< 


QQ 






Oct. ;'., 


0.32 


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9.15 p.M 


to 11.20 P.M. 


Dec. 


6, 


0.21 


Snow. 


5.00 p M. 


to 11.05 P.M. 


Oct. 9, 


0.02 


Rain. 


12.60 a.m. 


to 2.25 a.m. 


Dec. 


8, 


0.06 


Snow. 


10.00 A.M 


to 6.00 P.M. 


Oct. 11, 


0.14 


Rain. 


3.30 a.m. 


to 4.30 P.M. | 


Dec. 


12, 


J0.15 


Snow. 


6.00 P.M. 


to 


Oct. 12, 


j 0.92 


Rain. 


1.20 p.m. 


to 


Dec. 


13, 




6.30 A m. 


Oct. 13, 




3.30 a.m. 


Dec. 


16, 


j 0-71 


Snow. 


1.55 A.M 


to 


Oct. 21, 


0.64 


Rain. 


12 55 A.M. 


to 2.45 p.m. 


Dec. 


18, 




10.30 a.m. 


Oct. 26, 


0.17 


Rain. 


11.15 a.m. 


to 5.15 p.m. 


Dec. 


26, 


I 1.68 


Snow and 


11.45 P.M. 


to 












Dec. 


28, 


rain. 




10.00 A.M. 


Total, 


2.21 








) 










Total, 


2.81 








Nov. 13, 
Nov. 14, 


J 1.66 


Rain. 


8.30 A.M. 


to 

5.00 A.M. 




Nov. 21, 


0.05 


Rain. 


2.55 a.m. 


to 5.10 A M. 














Nov. 29, 
Nov. 30, 


J 0.10 


Rain. 


8.00 P.M. 


to 

1.25 A.M. 














Total, 


1.81 





Total for the year, 43.40 inches. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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M KTR0P0L1T AN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



231 



Table No. 19. — Average Daily Consumption of Water, during the Year 
1904, in the Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water 
Works, including Boston, Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Everett, Quincy, 
Medford, Melrose, Revere, Watertoivn, Arlington, Lexington, Milton, 
Stoneham, Winthrop, Swampscott, Belmont, Nahant and a Small Por- 
tion of Saugus. (For Consumption of Water in Whole Metropolitan 
Water District, see Table No. 23.) 





Average 




Consumption 


Month. 


Daily 


Estimated 


per 


Consumption 


Population. 


Inhabitant 




(Gallons). 




(Gallons). 


January 


134,479,000 


917,300 


147 


February, 












139,941,000 


919,100 


152 


March, 












120,392,000 


920,900 


131 


April, 














105,800,000 


922,700 


115 


May, . 














108,450,000 


924,500 


117 


June, 














107,825,000 


926,600 


116 


July, 














110,096,000 


928,600 


119 


August, 














109,477,000 


930,700 


118 


September 














110,866,000 


932,700 


119 


October, 














105,220,000 


934,800 


113 


November 














105,034,000 


936,800 


112 


December, 










121,986,000 
114,909,000 


938,900 


130 


Forth 


? year, 












927,800 


124 



Table No. 20. 



Average Daily Consumption of Water, in Gallons, from 
the Low Service System (1904). 



January, 

February, 

March, . 

April, . 

May, 

June, 

July, . 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



Month. 



For the year, 



Southern 
Low Service. 



Boston, ex- 
cluding East 

Boston and 
Charlestown. 



57,242,000 
58,976,000 
52,165,000 
45,164,000 
45,691,000 
44,398,000 
44,547,000 
44,954,000 
43,963,000 
41,958,000 
43.162,000 
50,168,000 

47,676,000 



Northern 
Low Service. 



Portions of Charles- 
town, Somerville, 
Chelsea, Everett, 
Maiden, Medford, 
East Boston and 
Arlington. 



35,627,000 
37,783,000 
29,519,000 
24,347,000 
25,158,000 
24,547,000 
24,789,000 
24,388,000 
26,076,000 
24,659,000 
23,991,000 
30,715,000 

27,609,000 



Total 

Low Service 

Consumption. 



92,869,000 
96,759,000 
81,684,000 
69,511 ,000 
70,849,000 
68,945,000 
69,336,000 
69,342,000 
70,039,000 
66,617,000 
67,153,000 
80,883,000 

75,285,000 



232 



MI^TKOPOLITAX WATER 



[Piil». Doc. 



Tabu NTo. 21.- 
the High 



— Average Daily Consumption of Water , in Gallons, from 
Service and Extra High Service Systems (1904). 




No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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[Pub. Doc. 



TABLI No. -•"'. — Consumption- of Water in the Metropolitan Water Dis- 
trict, as constituted December 31, 1904, th<> Town of Swampmott and a 
Small Sect inn of the Town of Saugus; 1893-1904, 

[Gallons per Day.] 



Month. 


1893. 


189 1. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


January 


75, 209,000 


67,506,000 


68,925,000 


82,946,000 


85,366,000 


83,880,000 


Kebruary, 








71,900,000 


68,944,000 


80,375,000 


87,021,000 


83,967,000 


87,475,000 


March, 








67,638,000 


62,710,000 


69,543,000 


86,111,000 


82,751,000 


85,468,000 


April, . 








62,309,000 


57,715,000 


62,909,000 


77,529,000 


79,914,000 


76,574,000 


May, 








61,025,000 


60,676,000 


65,194,000 


73,402,000 


76,772,000 


76,677,000 


Jane, 








63,374,000 


68,329,000 


69,905,000 


77,639,000 


77,952,000 


83,463,000 


•Hily, 








69,343,000 


73,642,000 


69,667,000 


80,000,000 


85,525,000 


88,228,000 


August, . 








66,983,000 


67,995,000 


72,233,000 


78,537,000 


84,103,000 


87,558,000 


September, 








1 64,654,000 


67,137,000 ! 73,724,000 


74,160,000 


84,296,000 


88,296,000 


October, . 








63,770,000 


62,735,000 67,028,000 


71,762,000 


79,551,000 


81,770,000 


November, 








61,204,000 


62*231,000 64,881,000 


71,933,000 


72,762,000 


78,177,000 


December, 




66,700,000 


65,108,000 | 70,443,000 


79,449,000 


76,594,000 


86,355,000 


Average for the year, 


! 66,165,000 


65,382,000 


69,499,000 


78,360,000 


80,793,000 


83,651,000 


Population 


:•.>:;, 153 


743,354 


763,557 


786,385 


809,213 


832,042 


Consumption per iuhabitant, 


91.5 


88.0 


91.0 


99.7 


99.8 


100.5 




This table includes the water consumed in the cities and towns enumerated in Table No. 19, together 
with the water consumed in Newton and Hyde Park, which are included in the Metropolitan Water 
District but have not been supplied from the Metropolitan "Works. 

Note relating to Chemical Examinations of Water, Tables Nos. 24-30. 

The chemical examinations contained in the tables were made by the 
State Board of Health. Colors have been determined by the Nessler 
standard, but the corresponding values by the platinum standard are also 
given, for the purpose of comparison with colors determined in the labora- 
tory of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, as given in subsequent 
tables. The odor recorded is taken in such a way that it is a much stronger 
odor than would be noticed in samples drawn directly from a tap or col- 
lected directly from a reservoir. The more important samples are collected 
and examined monthly ; those of less significance, at intervals of two or 
three months. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



243 



Table No. 30. 



Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in 
Boston, from 1892 to 1904. 

[Parts per 100,000.] 





Color. 


Residue on 
Evaporation. 


Ammonia. 


6 

a 

"hi 

o 
O 


Nitrogen 
as 


a 

3 

00 

a 
o 

o 

a 

V 

6(0 

« 

o 




Yeak. 


T3 

S-i 

as 
St a 

oo QU 


•6 

a! 

3 C 
C S3 

5 


o 


a" 
_o 

o an 

00 HH 
00 

o 

(J 


0> 
hi 


ALBUMINOID. 


oo 

ca 

<- 


oo 




"3 
o 
H 


T3 
> 

oo O 

Q 


T3 
CD 

2 S 

02 ^ 


03 
00 

a 
rs 
hi 

es 

a 


1892, . 


.37 


37 


4.70 


1.67 


.0007 


.0168 


.0138 


.0030 


.41 


.0210 


.0001 


- 


1.9 


1893, . 


.61 


53 


4.54 


1.84 


.0010 


.0174 


.0147 


.0027 


.38 


.0143 


.0001 


.60 


1.8 


1894, . 


.69 


58 


4.64 


1.83 


.0006 


.0169 


.0150 


.0019 


.41 


.0106 


.0001 


.63 


1.7 


1895, . 


.72 


59 


4.90 


2.02 


.0006 


.0197 


.0175 


.0022 


.40 


.0171 


.0001 


.69 


0.7 


1896, . 


.49 


45 


4.29 


1.67 


.0005 


.0165 


.0142 


.0023 


.37 


.0155 


.0001 


.56 


1.4 


1897, . 


.65 


55 


4.82 


1.84 


.0009 


.0193 


.0177 


.0016 


.40 


.0137 


.0001 


.64 


1.6 


1898, . 


.41 


40 


4.19 


1.60 


.0008 


.0152 


.0136 


.0016 


.29 


.0097 


.0001 


.44 


1.4 


1899, . 


.23 


28 


3.70 


1.30 


.0006 


.0136 


.0122 


.0014 


.24 


.0137 


.0001 


.35 


1.1 


1900, . 


.24 


29 


3.80 


1.20 


.0012 


.0157 


.0139 


.0018 


.25 


.0076 


.0001 


.38 


1.3 


1901, . 


.24 


29 


4.43 


1.64 


.0013 


.0158 


.0142 


.0016 


.30 


.0173 


.0001 


.42 


1.7 


1902, . 


.26 


30 


3.93 


1.56 


.0016 


.0139 


.0119 


.0020 


.29 


.0092 


.0000 


.40 


1.3 


1903, . 


.25 


29 


3.98 


1.50 


.0013 


.0125 


.0110 


.0015 


.30 


.0142 


.0001 


.39 


1.5 


1904, . 


.23 


28 


3.93 


1.59 


.0023 


.0139 


.0121 


.0018 


.34 


.0110 


.0001 


.37 


1.5 



Table No. 31. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 
Water Works, 1904. {Means of Weekly Determinations.) 

[Platinum Standard.] 









"Wachusett 
Reservoir. 


Sudbury Reservoir. 


Framinqham 

Reservoir 

No. 3. 


8pot 
Pond. 


Fells 
Reservoir. 


Month. 






jq 




a 


.c 


J3 


oJ 

00 












oS 












<D 


p. 




c 


ft 


a' a 








o 


a 


s-i C 


a> 


OJ 






o! 


03 


•a 




O 03 


T3 


T3 






5 


hi 


X) 


o 


SS 


2 


!S 


SO 




CO 


OQ 


§ 


.ffl 


m 


i 


.i 


H 


January, .... 


48 


52 


47 


44 


48 


41 


25 


23 


February, 






38 


44 


44 


44 


38 


40 


23 


20 


March, . 






39 


35 


37 


37 


59 


37 


24 


20 


April, 






39 


36 


36 


36 


44 


33 


22 


20 


May, 






39 


34 


36 


35 


45 


33 


20 


20 


June, 






40 


33 


33 


33 


40 


34 


20 


19 


July, 






39 


27 


27 


29 


38 


28 


20 


19 


August, . 






30 


24 


24 


25 


32 


24 


19 


18 


September, 






25 


22 


23 


23 


27 


24 


21 


18 


October, . 






23 


21 


22 


22 


25 


25 


21 


18 


November, 






21 


17 


17 


17 


31 


20 


19 


18 


December, 






23 


19 


17 


17 


24 


18 


20 
21 


18 


Mean, 


34 


30 


30 


30 


38 


30 


19 






METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 81 — Concluded. 

[Platinum Standard.] 











Lake Oochituate. 


CHX8TNTTT BlLX 

RESERVOIR. 


Northern 
Service. 


Southern 
Service. 










* 


*"N 


Q 


c^ 


T3"3 


§P • 


§o . 


s= . 


Month. 


ej 
6 

el 

%m 

3 


2 


S 

o 

«-» 

o 


to 

e 

a 
9 
c 

j. 

c 

= 


u 

3 <u 

CD^ 
5 


a 

3 
3 

5^ 


d 
"5 « 

O 3 

^ o 

<D 

3 

SB 


ap at Glenwoc 
Yard, Medfoi 
(Low Service). 


apat44Clarend 
Street, Malde 
(High Service) 


apat 244 Boylst 
Street, Bos to 
(Low Service) 


apat 1 Ashburt< 
Place, Bob to 
(High Service) 




CD 


i 


CQ 


t— 1 


>— i 


HH 


W 


E* 


H 


H 


H 


January, 


34 


S4 


36 


56 


42 


35 


41 


- 


- 


43 


41 


February, 








26 


29 


30 


72 


41 


29 


37 


- 


- 


39 


38 


March, . 








33 


31 


33 


77 


37 


32 


35 


- 


- 


36 


34 


April, 








38 


37 


41 


78 


. 34 


31 


33 


32 


20 


33 


32 


May, 








36 


34 


34 


91 


35 


- 


33 


31 


20 


34 


33 


June, 








33 


32 


40 


82 


35 


- 


34 


34 


20 


34 


.34 


July, 








31 


33 


55 


62 


30 


30 


28 


29 


19 


30 


30 


August, . 








27 


31 


74 


47 


25 


25 


24 


23 


17 


25 


25 


September, 








27 


32 


93 


48 


38 


27 


32 


32 


18 


29 


32 


October, 








29 


104 


62 


36 


29 


30 


28 


19 


26 


29 


November, 








33 


33 


48 


57 


45 


32 


39 


34 


24 


29 


37 


December, 








32 
31 


29 
32 


30 


63 


34 


28 


32 


32 


18 


27 
32 


31 


Mean, 


52 


66 


36 


- 


33 


33 



* The colors given in this column represent the combined colors of the waters of the four principal 
feeders. The color of each is determined monthly, and due weight is given, in combining the results, to 
the sizes of the streams. 

Table No. 32. — Temper at ares of Water from Various Parts of the Metro- 
politan Water Works, 1904. (Means of Weekly Determinations.) 

[The temperatures are taken at the same places and times as the samples for microscopical examination; 
the depth given for each reservoir is the depth from high water mark.] 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 





Wachtjsett 
Reservoir. 


Sudbury Reservoir 

(Depth at Place of 

Observation 

54.5 Feet). 


Frajiingham Reser- 
voir No. 3 (Depth 

at Place of Obser- 
vation 20.5 Feet). 


Lake Cochituate 

(Depth at Place of 

Observation 62.0 

Feet). 


Month. 


6 

V 

<^ 

u 
3 
CD 


9 

y 

es 

1-1 

3 
CO 


s. 

9 

V 

13 


a 

o 

o 

pq 


3 . 

O es 

•So 


9 

o 

CJ 

3 
CD 


■a 

04 

9 

•a 

i 


a 

o 

o 

pq 


op 

a 

t> 
3 
CD 


J3 

04 

9 

•a 

i 


S 

o 

o 

ca 


January, 


32.4 


32.3 


33.0 


34.3 


33.2 


34.1 


35.0 


35.8 


34.6 


35.6 


36.0 


February, . 


33.8 


31.9 


32.8 


34.4 


32.0 


33.9 


35.0 


36.0 


34.9 


36.0 


37.1 


March, . 


33.1 


32.8 


33.3 


33.8 


35.0 


35.6 


36.3 


36.7 


36.0 


36.8 


37.8 


April, . 


40.6 


44.3 


43.7 


42.7 


37.8 


45.5 


45.3 


45.3 


43.3 


42.5 


41.6 


May, 


55.4 


59.3 


56.4 


54.6 


55.0 


61.3 


59.8 


57.5 


59.7 


46.9 


45.4 


June, . 


66.4 


68.9 


65.3 


63.5 


63.8 


70.3 


68.7 


67.1 


67.4 


47.8 


45.8 


July, . 


67.3 


75.3 


72.5 


69.8 


70.0 


75.5 


73.5 


70.8 


71.8 


49.0 


45.3 


August, 


71.0 


73.5 


72.9 


72.3 


71.5 


73.3 


72.7 


71.8 


71.2 


49.3 


46.8 


September, . 


68.2 


66.7 


66.0 


65.7 


66.3 


67.3 


66.5 


66.4 


65.3 


50.5 


47.0 


October, 


56.7 


57.5 


56.1 


55.6 


55.5 


55.0 


55.0 


40.0 


55.8 


51.5 


46.8 


November, . 


44.1 


41.5 


42.3 


42.4 


40.2 


40.6 


41.4 


40.0 


44.8 


43.1 


42.2 


December, . 


35.0 


33.6 


36.0 


37.4 


34.8 


34.3 


35.3 


35.8 


32.5 


34.0 


36.3 


Mean, . 


50.3 


51.5 


50.9 


50.5 


49.6 


52.2 


52.0 


50.3 


51.4 


43.6 


42.3 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



245 



Table No. 32 — Concluded. 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 













Chestnut 

Hill 
Reservoir. 


Spot Pond (Depth at 

Place op Observation 

28.0 Feet). 


Northern 

Service. 


Southern 
Service . 


Month. 


c4 

o 








nwood 
edford 
rice). 


irendon 
alden 
vice). 


a a 
Sou 

tut) 


burton 
os ton 
vice.) 






a 

as 

=3 
02 


09 

-a 
2 


a 

o 

o 


Tap at Gle 
Yard, M 
(Low Ser 


Tapat44Cl£ 
Street, M 
(High Ser 


Tap at 244 B 
Street, B 
(Low Ser 


Tap at 1 Ash 
Place, B 
(High Sei 


January, ... 


35.5 


33.5 


34.0 


34.5 


- 


- 


37.9 


37.5 


February, 










36.1 


34.1 


35.9 


36.0 


- 


- 


38.1 


37.2 


March, 










36.5 


35.8 


36.5 


37.4 


- 


- 


38.3 


37.9 


April, . 










44.8 


42.8 


42.7 


42.8 


42.5 


42.3 


46.6 


45.8 


May, . 










59.6 


58.1 


57.4 


53.3 


55.0 


51.4 


57.7 


58.0 


June, . 










67.6 


67.8 


66.9 


59.3 


61.6 


58.5 


67.0 


67.3 


July, . 










73.1 


73.7 


72.7 


63.1 


68.3 


64.8 


71.2 


71.4 


August, 










73.9 


72.6 


72.2 


66.8 


69.1 


66.6 


73.0 


72.8 


September, 










67.8 


66.3 


65.7 


66.7 


65.6 


64.1 


68.0 


68.0 


October, 










56.4 


56,7 


56.3 


56.3 


58.5 


59.0 


57.7 


57.2 


November, 










43.1 


39.5 


39.5 


39.6 


47.2 


50.3 


46.0 


45.8 


December, 










36.2 


34.8 


35.4 


35.4 


39.1 


41.4 


38.8 


38.7 


Mean, 


52.6 


51.3 


51.3 


49.3 


- - 


- 


53.4 


53.1 



Table No. 33. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metro- 
politan Water Works, 1904. 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 











Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir. 


Framingham. 


Clinton. 


Month. 


E 

a 

"5 

a 

8 


a 

a 

"S 

§ 


a 


a 

P 

a 

"3 

eg 


a 

s 

a 

'3 


a 
a 

2 


a 
a 

a 
3 


a 

p 

a 


a 


January, . . . . 43.0 


—17.0 


20.5 


45 


—24 


18.3 


37.5 


—16.0 


14.9 


February, 






47.5 


-8.0 


21.1 


48 


—5 


20.2 


47.0 


—7.0 


17.6 


March, 






71.0 


2.0 


34.4 


68 





34.3 


67.0 


—4.0 


31.2 


April, 








70.0 


22.0 


45.3 


73 


20 


45.2 


70.0 


21.0 


43.2 


May,. 








89.0 


34.0 


61.7 


89 


34 


60.8 


85.0 


38.0 


60.9 


June, 








94.5 


39.0 


63.8 


92 


39 


64.1 


90.5 


35.5 


63.3 


July, . 








93.5 


47.0 


71.5 


93 


48 


70.8 


90.0 


49.0 


69.9 


August, 








91.5 


44.0 


68.4 


90 


44 


67.1 


86.5 


46.0 


66.9 


September 








88.0 


29.5 


62.4 


85 


25 


61.1 


81.0 


27.0 


69.6 


October, 








75.0 


25.0 


49.4 


75 


20 


48.3 


74.5 


22.0 


47.7 


November 








58.0 


10.0 


36.2 


58 


6 


36.1 


54.0 


10.0 


33.4 


December, 








46.5 


2.0 


23.6 
46.5 


48 


—7 


22.7 

45.7 


49.5 


—4.5 


20.9 


Averaj 


?e, 


- 


- 


44.1 



240 



MF/riUH'OLITAN WATKK 



[Pub. Doc, 



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43 


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:M> 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



| Pub. Dor. 



Table No. 37. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters ana 1 Fire Hydrants 
in the Several Cities and Towns supplied })>j t/ie Metropolitan Water 
Works. 



City oh Town. 



Services. 


Meters. 


Fire 
Hydrants. 


90,571 


4,748 


7,919 


11,055 


1,275 


986 


6,750 


4,769 


404 


6,357 


126 


296 


5,378 


184 


661 


4,853 


78 


504 


4,142 


218 


489 


3,307 


105 


284 


2,623 


60 


127 


1,767 


1,666 


322 


1,891 


25 


117 


651 


651 


153 


425 


71 


65 


1,806 


115 


357 


1,171 


- 


125 


1,327 


26 


103 


1,127 


1,127 


283 


660 


12 


94 


145,861 


15,246 


13,289 



Boston, 
Somei ville, . 
Maiden, 
Chelsea, 
Quincy, 
Everett, 
Medford, 
Melrose, 
Kevere, 
Watertown, 
Winthrop, . 
Belmont, 
Xahant, 
Arlington, . 
Swampscott, 
Stoneham, . 
Milton, 
Lexington, . 
Total, . 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD, 



249 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



251 



Appendix No. 4. 



Water Works Statistics for the Year 1904. 

The Metropolitan Water Works supply the Metropolitan Water District, 
which includes the following cities and towns : — 



City or Town. 



Population, 

Census of 

1900. 



Estimated 
Population, 
May 1, 1904. 



Boston, 

Somerville, 

Chelsea, 

Maiden, 

Newton,* 

Everett, 

Quincy, 

Medford, 

Hyde Park,* • . 

Melrose 

Revere, 

Watertown, ......... 

Arlington 

Milton, 

Stoneham, 

Winthrop, 

Belmont, 

Lexington, 

Nahant, 

Total population of Metropolitan Water District, 

Swampscott,t 

Saugus, J 



560,892 

61,643 

34,072 

33,664 

33,587 

24,336 

23,899 

18,244 

13,244 

12,962 

10,395 

9,706 

8,603 

6,578 

6,197 

6,058 

3,929 

3,831 

1,152 




610,300 

70,000 

37,800 

40,700 

39,000 

29,200 

27,700 

22,000 

14,500 

14,400 

13,400 

11,200 

10,100 

7,700 

6,400 

7,700 

5,000 

4,100 

1,400 



972,600 

5,200 

200 



* No water supplied to these places during the year from Metropolitan Water Works. 
t Not in the Metropolitan Water District, but has been supplied with water from the Metropolitan 
Water Works. 
X Only a small portion of Saugus is supplied with water. 



252 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc 



Sources of Supply, 



ROB. 


Ari'ii of 

Watershed 

(Square Miles). 


Remark!, 


Ntshoa Uiver (South Brunch), . . .1 118.31 


Works built by city of Boston in 1848. 
Works built by city of Boston in 1872-78. 
Works begun in 1895; not finished. 



Mode of Supply. 

26 per cent, from gravity. 
74 per cent, from pumping. 

Pumping. 
Chestnut Hill High-service Station : — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company, Quintan!. Iron 
Works and E. P. Allis Company. 

Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Quemahoning, Georges Creek Cumber- 
land, Pocahontas and Cumberland steam; anthracite: buckwheat and screen- 
ings. Price per gross ton in bins : bituminous $ 4.15 to $5.36, buckwheat $3.28, 
screenings $2.24 and $3.44. Average price per gross ton $3.87. Percent, ashes, 
12.4. 

Chestnut Hill Low-service Station : — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company. 

Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Quemahoning, Georges Creek Cumber- 
land, Pocahontas and Cumberland steam; anthracite: buckwheat and screen- 
ings. Price per gross ton in bins : bituminous $3.98 to $5.36, buckwheat $3.08, 
screenings $ 2.24 to $3.67. Average price per gross ton $3.97. Per cent, ashes, 
12.0. 

Spot Pond Station : — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Geo. F. Blake Manufacturing Company and 

Holly Manufacturing Company. 
Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Georges Creek Cumberland ; anthracite : 

buckwheat and screenings. Price per gross ton in bins : bituminous $4.40, 

buckwheat $3.75, screenings $2.24. Average price per gross ton $3.65. Per 

cent, ashes, 13 9. 



Chestnut Hill High-service 
Station. 



Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 



Engine 
No. 3. 



Engine 
No. 4. 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons), 

Coal consumed for year (pounds), 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 
Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million gallons), 

Average dynamic head (feet), 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Duty on brisis of plunger displacement, 

Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, .... 
Cost per million gallons raised one foot, 



16,000,000 

1,012,902 

$4,131.34 

576.20 

120.69 

568.12 

65,400,000 

$7,170 

0.059 



20,000,000 

279,676 

$1,326.52 

292.86 

127.90 

1,047.14 

120,540,000 

$4,529 

0.035 



30,000,000 

8,656,737 

$29,567.41 

10,522.75 

129.30 

1,215.56 

134,950,000 

$2,810 

0.022 



Jfo. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



253 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons) 

Coal consumed for year (pounds), 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, . 
Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million gallons), . 

Average dynamic head (feet) 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Duty on basis of plunger displacement, 

Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, .... 
Cost per million gallons raised one foot 



Chestnut Hill 

Low-service 

Station. 



Engines Nos. 5, 
6 and 7. 



105,000,000 

8,662,868 

$33,864.15 

20,268.94 

54.91 

2,339.75 

110,290,000 

$1,671 

0.030 



Spot Pond 
Station. 



Engine No. 9. 



20,000,000 

2,462,802 

$11,868.79 

2,927.47 

129.33 

1,188.67 

132,070,000 

$4,054 

0.031 



Consumption. 
Estimated total population of the nineteen cities and towns sup- 
plied wholly or partially during the year 1904, . . . 927,800 

Total consumption, gallons, 42,057,180,000 

Average daily consumption, gallons, 114,909,000 

Gallons per day to each inhabitant, 123.9 

Distribution. 



Owned and 

operated 

by Metropolitan 

Water and 
Sewerage Board. 



Total in District 

supplied 
by Metropolitan 
Water Works. 



Kinds of pipe used, .... 

Sizes, 

Extensions less length abandoned, miles, 

Length in use, miles 

Stop gates added 

Stop gates now in use, .... 
Service pipes added, .... 
Service pipes now in use, . 

Meters added 

Meters now in use, .... 

Fire hydrants added 

Fire hydrants now in use, . 



60 to 6 inch. 

.02 

84.21 

3 

356 



-t 
60 to 4 inch. 
13.71 
1,507.81 



1,343 

145,861 

882 

15,246 

178 

13,289 



* Cast-iron and cement-lined wrought iron. f Cast-iron, cement-lined wrought iron and kalamine. 



254 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Dor. 



Appendix No . 5 . 



Contracts made and pending duiuno 
Contracts relating to the 





1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 


S. 

WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount op Bid. 


G. 




4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 


S. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 

2 

3 
4 


44 

45 

46 
50 


Section 63, Belmont Ex- 
tension, Cambridge, 22 
in by 28 in., 24 in. by 
28 in. and 25 in. diameter 
brick sewer in open cut 
and tunnel. 

Pile driving, in advance of 
excavation, on Sections 
61 and 62, Revere Exten- 
sion, Chelsea. 

Part of Section 62, Revere 
Extension, Chelsea, 48 
in. brick sewer in tunnel. 

Part of Section 61, Revere 
Extension, Chelsea, 608 
linear feet of 54 in. brick 
sewer in tunnel. 


7 


$49,691 50 


$45,288 00 


Gow & Palmer, Boston, 
Mass. 

Mayo Contracting Co., 
Boston, Mass. 

Chas. A. Haskin, Bos 
ton, Mass. 

Chas. A. Haskin, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 



Contracts relating to the 



5 


16 


Section 77, High-level 
Sewer, Roxbury, pump- 
ing plant for Ward Street 
pumping station. 


3 


$207,000 00 


$204,000 00 


Allis-Chalmers Co., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 


6 


22 


Part of Section 43, Quincy 
and Hull, westerly line of 
60-inch cast-iron pipe, 
harbor outfalls. 


2 


109,273 50 


94,492 45 j 


Hiram W, Phillips, 
Quincy, Mass. 


7 


27 


8ection 77, High-level 
Sewer, Roxbury, Ward 
Street pumping station 
and connections. 


6 


235,719 50 


224,505 00 


L. P. Soule & Son, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 


8 


35 


Parts of Section 44, High- 
level Sewer, Quincy. 


4 


133,845 00 


125,554 60 


W. H. Ellis, Boston, 
Mass. 


9 


33 


Section 46, High-level 
Sewer, Quincy. 


3 


40,328 00 


37,044 00 


W. H. Ellis, Boston, 
Mass. 


10 


36 


Section 76, High-level 
Sewer, Roxbury, laying 
48 inch force-mains and 
building connecting 
sewer. 


4 


29,150 00 


26,230 00 


H. P. Nawn, Boston, 
Mass. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



255 



Appendix No. 5 



the Year 1904 — Sewerage Works. 
North Metropolitan System. 



7. 

Date 
of Contract. 


8. 

Date of 

Completion of 

Work. 


9. 

Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1904. 


10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31,1904. 




Sept. 14, '03, 

Oct. 9, '03, 

Oct. 23, '03, 
May 3, '04, 


Apr. 23, '04, 

June 24, '04, 

Apr. 14, '04, 
Aug. 18, »04, 


For completed sewer in tunnel, except piling to be 
furnished and placed by the Board, $21 per linear 
foot. 


$47,273 69 

13,802 80 

27,902 68 
12,768 00 


1 

2 

3 
4 




$101,747 17 













South Metropolitan System. 



Jan. 17, '02, 

May 28, '02, 

Oct. 8, '02, 

June 11, '03, 
June 11, '03, 



Sept. 29,' 04, 

May 31, '04, 

May 26, '04, 
May 14, '04, 



June 9, '03, Jan. 23, '04, 



$153,000 00 

94,592 96 

227,140 93 

114,850 23 
29,453 38 
29,366 06 



256 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



I ONTRACT8 MADE AND PKNDING DURING 
Contracts relating to the 



i. 

Num- 
ber 

tract. 



WORE. 



v:, 



42 



:;9 



40 



49 



48 



Part of Section 43, High- 
level Sower, Quiucy and 
Hull, easterly line of 60- 
inch caet-iron pipe, har- 
bor outfalls. 

Two vertical fire-tube boil- 
ers and fittings for the 
Nut Island screen-house, 
Quincy. 

Fart of Section 44, High- 
level Sewer, Quincy, 
screen-house on Nut 
Island. 

Quincy pumping station, 
force-main line, 299 
tons 24-inch cast-iron 
pipeand special castings. 

Easterly line of Section 43, 
High-level Sewer, Quincy 
and Hull, 2,265 tons 60- 
inch cast-iron pipe and 
special castings. 

Screening machinery for 
the Nut Island screen- 
house, and the "Ward 
Street pumping station 
of the High-level Sewer, 
Quincy and Roxbury. 

Additional filling on em- 
bankments and complet- 
ing Rock Island Road 
over Section 48, High- 
level Sewer, Quincy. 

Total 



Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



A moint ok Bid. 



I. 

Next to Low- 
est. 



$6,430 00 



29,971 00 



7,857 60 



64,617 80 



31,100 00 



9,570 00 



3. 

Lowest. 



$6,315 00 



29,940 00 



7,238 50 



56,966 70 



24,054 00 



7,500 00 



6. 



Contractor. 



Hiram W. Phillips, 
Quincy, Mass. 



Edward Kendall & Sons, 
Cambridge, Mass. 



Woodbury & Leighton 
Co., Boston, Mass. 



Camden Iron Works, 
Camden, N. J. 



Camden Iron Works, 
Camden, N. J. 



The Lockwood Manu- 
facturing Company, 
Boston. 



Joseph J. Moebs, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD 



257 



the Year 1904 — Sewerage Works — Continued. 
South Metropolitan System — Concluded. 



7. 

Date 
of Contract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion of 

Work. 



9. 

Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1904. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 1904. 



June 30, '03, 



Aug. 14, '03, 



Sept. 11, '03, 



Dec. 21, '03, 



Dec. 21, '03, 



May 19, '04, 



May 23, '04, 



Nov. 2, '04, 



Nov. 1, '04, 



Oct. 20, '04, 



May 31, '04, 



Aug. 27, '04, 



Nov. 3, '04, 



Oct. 21, '04, 



Nut Island screening machinery, $12,862; Ward 
Street screening machinery, $11,192. 



Earth excavation and filling on embankments, $0.54 
per cu. yd., loam and peat excavation and placing 
on slopes of embankments, $0.65 per cu. yd., 
placing rock ballast, $1 per cu. yd. in place. 



),511 04 



6,315 00 



29,940 00 



7,291 67 



56,091 28 



24.054 00 



7,113 55 



$878,720 10 



258 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doe. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1904 — Sewerage 

WORKS — Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts.* 



Value of Work 

done December 

31, 1904. 



North Metropolitan System, 4 contracts, ...... 

South Metropolitan .System, 13 contract* 

Total of 17 contracts made and pending during the year 1904, 



$101,747 17 
878,720 10 



$980,467 27 



* In this summary the cost of day work, and contracts charged to maintenance are excluded. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



259 



Appendix No. 6. 



LEGISLATION OF THE YEAR 1904 AFFECTING THE 
METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



ACTS OF 1904. 

[Chapter 30.] 

An Act making an appropriation for printing and binding 
the annual report of the metropolitan water and sew- 
erage board. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. The sum of twenty-five hundred dollars is hereby Report of the 

-, i • -i « i * i ^ metropolitan 

appropriated, to be paid out or the treasury of the Common- water and 
wealth from the ordinary revenue, for printing and binding the board." 
annual report of the metropolitan water and sewerage board, 
the cost of the same to be assessed and collected by the treas- 
urer and receiver general equally upon and from the metropolitan 
water and metropolitan sewerage districts. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved January 30, 1904. 



[Chapter 60.] 

An Act making an appropriation for operating the south 
metropolitan system of sewage disposal. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1 . A sum not exceeding one hundred and thirty- South metro- 

. . J politan system 

five thousand dollars is hereby appropriated, to be paid out of of sewage 
the South Metropolitan System Maintenance Fund, for the cost 
of maintenance and operation of the south metropolitan system 
of sewage disposal, comprising a part of Boston, the cities of 
Newton, Quincy and Waltham, and the towns of Brookline, 
Watertown, Dedham, Hyde Park and Milton, during the year 
ending on the thirty-first day of December, nineteen hundred 
and four. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved February 6, 1904. 



260 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



North metro* 
politan Byetem 
of -i'w age 
disposal 



[Chapter 62.] 

An Act making an appropriation for operating the north 
metropolitan system op sewage disposal. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding one hundred and twenty- 
three thousand dollars is hereby appropriated, to be paid out of 
the North Metropolitan System Maintenance Fund, to provide 
for the cost of maintaining and operating the system of sewage 
disposal for the cities of Boston, Cambridge, Somerville, Mai- 
den, Chelsea, Woburn, Medford, Melrose and Everett, and the 
towns of Stoneham, Winchester, Arlington and Belmont, known 
as the North Metropolitan System, during the year ending on 
the thirty-first day of December, nineteen hundred and four. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
\_ Approved February 6>, 1904. 



189:), 342, § 1, 
etc., amended. 



Time within 
which certain 
petitions for 
damages, etc., 
may be filed 
extended. 



[Chapter 186.] 

An Act to extend the time for filing petitions for damages 
and offers of surrender of real estate under the act to 
provide for a metropolitan water supply. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Section one of chapter three hundred and forty- 
two of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-nine, 
as amended by section one of chapter one hundred and eight of 
the acts of the year nineteen hundred, and by section one of 
chapter four hundred and ninety-eight of the acts of the year 
nineteen hundred and one, is hereby further amended by strik- 
ing out the word " four", in the seventeenth line, and inserting 
in place thereof the word : — five, — so as to read as follows : — 
Section 1. Petitions under the provisions of section fourteen 
of chapter four hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and ninety-five, or of section one of chapter 
four hundred and forty-five of the acts of the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-seven, and acts in amendment thereof or 
in addition thereto, for the determination of damages for the 
taking of real estate may be filed, as provided by law, within 
two years after the actual taking by right of eminent domain of 
such real estate or of any interest therein, and petitions for the 
determination of damages for the taking of water rights where 
no land is taken in connection with such water rights, and for 
the determination of all other damage provided for in said acts, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 261 

and offers of surrender of real estate provided for in said 
acts, may be filed on or before the first day of July in the year 
nineteen hundred and five. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 29, 1904. 



[Chapter 230.] 

An Act to authorize the metropolitan water and sewerage 
board to determine the lines and grades of the high 
level metropolitan sewer above the point where the 
sewage op the charles river valley is to be received. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board is Location, etc., 

. .of high level 

hereby authorized to determine the location, elevation and size metropolitan 
of the high level metropolitan sewer above the point where the 
sewage from the Charles River valley is to be received. 

Section 2. To meet the expenses of determining the said Treasurer 

v ° and receiver 

location, as provided in section one, the treasurer and receiver general to issue 

r scrip or certifl- 

general is authorized to issue scrip or certificates of debt in the cates of debt, 
& v etc. 

name and on behalf of the Commonwealth, and under its seal, 
to an amount not exceeding seven thousand dollars in addition 
to the amounts authorized to be issued under the provisions of 
chapter four hundred and twenty- our of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and ninety-nine, and of chapter three hundred 
and fifty-six of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and three ; 
and all the provisions of said acts shall apply to this additional 
loan. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 12, 1904. 



[Chapter 246.] * 

An Act to provide for expenses incurred in the construc- 
tion OP THE HIGH LEVEL GRAVITY SEWER FOR THE RELIEF OF 
THE CHARLES AND NEPONSET RIVER VALLEYS. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. The treasurer and receiver general of the Com- Treasurer 
monwealth, in order to meet additional expenses incurred under general to issue 
the provisions of chapter four hundred and twenty- four of the Sates of debt, 
acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-nine, and chapter etc ' 
three hundred and fifty-six of the acts of the year nineteen 
hundred and three, shall, with the approval of the governor 



262 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

and council, issue from time to time scrip or certificates of debt 
in the name and behalf of the Commonwealth and under its 
seal, to an amount not exceeding three hundred and eighty-five 
thousand dollars, in addition to the amounts authorized to be 
issued under the provisions of said chapters ; and the provi- 
sions of said chapters and of acts in amendment thereof and in 
addition thereto shall apply to this additional loan. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 22, 1904. 



[Chapter 273.] 

An Act to authorize, the laying of water pipes or mains 
under or over tide water. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 
n water Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board, and 

]>iju>s or mams l ° ' 

may be carried the water board, water commissioners or superintendent of any 

under or over ' ^ 

tide waters, etc. city or town in the metropolitan water district, in exercising 
the powers or discharging the duties conferred or imposed by 
chapter four hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and ninety-five and acts in amendment thereof 
and in addition thereto, may carry and conduct any aqueduct, 
conduit, pipe, drain or wire under or over tide waters or the 
waters of Boston harbor by such methods and in such manner 
as the board of harbor and land commissioners shall approve. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 29, 1904. 



[Chapter 299.] 

An Act to confirm a certain agreement between the met- 
ropolitan WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD AND THE CITY OF 
MARLBOROUGH, RELATIVE TO' BUILDING AN ADDITIONAL MAIN 
SEWER AND FILTER BEDS FOR SAID CITY. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Certain agree- Section 1. The agreement signed by the mayor of the city 
ment between & & J J J 

city of Marl of Marlborough, for that city, and by the metropolitan water 

borough and ° ' J ' J , , r 

metropolitan and sewerage board, for the Commonwealth, dated October 

wjitcr jiiid S6W- 

erage board five, nineteen hundred and three, and recorded with Middlesex 
south district registry of deeds, book 3091, page 101, providing 
for the construction and maintenance of an additional main 
sewer and filter beds for the disposal of a part of the sewage of 
said city, as a substitute for the additional main sewer provided 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 263 

for by chapter four hundred and forty-three of the acts of the 
year nineteen hundred and three, is hereby ratified and con- 
firmed ; and all action taken, all construction work done and all 
payments made under said agreement in the construction of said 
additional main sewer and filter beds, are hereby ratified, ap- 
proved and made valid, as fully as if such additional main sewer 
had been constructed in accordance with the provisions of said 
chapter. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 6, 1904. 



[Chapter 311.] 

An Act relative to the employment of mechanics and 
laborers in the construction of public works. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Chapter one hundred and six of the Revised Laws is hereby r. l. 106, § u, 
amended by striking out section fourteen and inserting in place 
thereof the following: — Section 14. In the employment of Preference to 
mechanics and laborers in the construction of public works by citizens in the 
the Commonwealth, or by a county, city or town, or by persons mechanics and 
contracting therewith, preference shall be given to citizens of 
the Commonwealth, and, if they cannot be had in sufficient 
numbers, then to citizens of the United States ; and every con- 
tract for such works shall contain a provision to this effect. 
Any contractor who knowingly and wilfully violates the pro- penalty, 
visions of this section shall be punished by a fine of not more 
than one hundred dollars for each offence. [Approved May 9, 
1904. 



[Chapter 314.] 

An Act to regulate removals and suspensions from office 
and employment in the classified civil service. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. Every person holding office or employment in the Persons hoid- 
public service of the Commonwealth or in any county, city or plfbiic service 6 
town thereof, classified under the civil service rules of the Com- mpyed^etc!, 
monwealth, shall hold such office or employment and shall not 
be removed therefrom, lowered in rank or compensation, or sus- 
pended, or, without his consent, transferred from such office or 
employment to any other except for just cause and for reasons 
specifically given in writing. 



without cause. 



264 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Notice t«> be 
given, etc. 



Section 2. The person sought to be removed, suspended, 
lowered or transferred shall be notified of the proposed action 
and shall he furnished with a copy of the reasons required to 
be given by section one, and shall, if he so requests in writing, 
he given a public hearing, and he allowed to answer the charges 
preferred against him either personally or by counsel. A copy 
of such reasons, notice and answer and of the order of removal, 
suspension or transfer shall be made a matter of public record. 
[Approved May .9, 1904. 



Payment of 
damages for 
the taking of 
property.Dy 

right of emi- 
nent domain, 
etc. 



Proviso. 



[Chapter 317.] 

An Act relative to damages for the taking of property 
by right of eminent domain. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows ; 

Section 1. In all cases of property, real or personal, taken 
by right of eminent domain, or subjected to restrictions, limita- 
tions or regulations by the Commonwealth, or by any county, 
city or town therein, the Commonwealth or such county, city or 
town may, at any time after such taking, or after the imposi- 
tion of such restrictions, limitations or regulations, estimate and 
award to any person, city, town or corporation injured by such 
taking or by such imposition, the damages recoverable therefor, 
and may offer in writing to pay to such person, city, town or 
corporation the amount of such award, with interest thereon, as 
provided by law, from the date of such taking or such imposi- 
tion, together with taxable costs if a petition or other proceed- 
ing for assessment of such damages is pending. The person, 
city, town or corporation to whom or to which such offer is 
made, may reject or accept the same, and acceptance thereof 
may be either in full satisfaction of all damages so sustained, 
or as a payment pro tanto without prejudice to any right to have 
said damages assessed by a jury or other competent tribunal. 
After notice of such offer, made as aforesaid, or payment of the 
amount thereof, if payment be made, no interest shall be re- 
coverable, except upon such amount in damages as shall, upon 
final adjudication, be in excess of the amount of said offer: 
provided, that all taxable costs accruing subsequently to said 
offer shall be recoverable by the petitioner in all cases. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 9, 1904. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 265 

[Chapter 349.] 

An Act to provide for the protection of persons furnish- 
ing MATERIALS OR LA.BOR FOR PUBLIC WORKS. 

Be it enacted, etc., asfolloivs : 

Section 1. Officers or agents who contract in behalf of any Protection of 

° persons f ur- 

countv, city or town for the construction or repair of public nishingmate- 

. . . rials or labor 

buildings or other public works shall obtain sufficient security, for public 
by bond or otherwise, for payment by the contractor and sub- 
contractors for labor performed or furnished and for materials 
used in such construction or repair ; but in order to obtain the 
benefit of such security the claimant shall file with such officers 
or agents a sworn statement of his claim within sixty days after 
the completion of the work. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 19, 1904. 



[Chapter 388.] 

An Act relative to printing and binding certain public 

documents. 

'Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 2. Boards, commissions and heads of departments statistics not to 
having charge of preparing and printing documents relating to public docu- 
their various departments shall not incorporate therein any sta- approval of 
tistics unless the same shall be approved by the state board of ligation. pu 
publication. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 31, 1904. 



[Chapter 406.] 

An Act to provide for the improvement of spot pond brook 
by the metropolitan water and sewerage board. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 
Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board The metropoii- 

° tan water and 

shall improve or change the channel of Spot Pond brook between sewerage board 

r« t • , n /-I i n . -. t0 improve 

spot pond in the town of Stoneham and tide water in the city Spot Pond 
of Maiden substantially in accordance with the plans and rec- 
ommendations of the board contained in its report to the general 
court of nineteen hundred and three, being house document 
number one thousand and eighty-seven of that year. 



266 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

lemeutaTetc 1 SBCWON '2. The board, for the purpose aforesaid, may from 
time to time take, in fee or otherwise, by purchase or otherwise, 
for the Commonwealth or for the city of Maiden or for the city 
of Melrose, as the board shall determine, lands, easements, 
rights and other property, and, in order to take any property by 
right of eminent domain, shall sign and cause to be recorded in 
the registry of deeds for the county and district in which the 
property to be taken is situated a description thereof as certain 
as is required in a common conveyance of land ; the recording 
shall constitute the taking. 

Section 3. Any person whose property is injured by the 
taking, or by changing the channel of said brook, altering its 
course, or diverting the waters thereof or increasing or dimin- 
ishing the daily flow of said waters, may have compensation 
therefor as determined by agreement with the board, and if the 
parties cannot agree upon the damages, they may be determined 
by a jury of the superior court for the county in which the 
property is situated under the provisions, so far as they may be 
applicable, of chapter forty-eight of the Revised Laws, upon 
petition therefor by the board or person filed in the clerk's office 
of the court within one year after the taking, changing or alter- 
ing, and the petitioner shall have judgment for the amount de- 
termined, with interest on the excess of the amount over the 
award of the board and costs if the amount is greater than the 
award of the board ; otherwise the petitioner shall recover no 
interest and shall pay costs. 
£°be mi9Si0nev3 Section 4. Any justice of the supreme judicial court sitting 

appointed, [ n equity for the county of Suffolk, on application of the metro- 
powers and "» «J J rr 

duties. politan water and sewerage board or of the city of Maiden or of 

the city of Melrose, within three months after the passage of 
this act, shall, after such notice as the court shall order, appoint 
three commissioners, and may appoint a new commissioner on 
the occurring of any vacancy. The commissioners, after such 
notice as they shall deem proper, shall hear the parties and 
make award of the proportion in which the expenses of carrying 
out this act shall be paid by the metropolitan water district, the 
city of Maiden, and the city of Melrose. The commissioners 
shall take into consideration in making their award the respon- 
sibility of said parties in connection with the present condition 
of said brook and the waters thereof, their rights in, to and over 
said brook and the waters thereof, their rights in, to and over 
said Spot pond, its waters and watershed so far as they relate 
to said brook, and the benefits which will accrue to said parties 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 267 

from the proposed improvements ; and shall make their award 
on these bases and return it into court with a statement of the 
questions of law raised by either party and the findings of the 
commissioners thereon. 

Section 5. Any justice of the said court sitting in equity a ir a . ( r d lgS t and 
for the county of Suffolk may accept the findings and award, 
and either party may except thereto; or the justice may report 
the case with such of said questions of law as either party may 
request to the supreme judicial court of the Commonwealth. 
Said court may determine the questions submitted and accept 
the award, or may amend and accept the award, or may remand 
the award to the commissioners for further hearing, report and 
acceptance, in accordance with said determination : provided, Provlso - 
however, that if the city of Maiden by vote of its city council, 
or the city of Melrose by vote of its city council, or the metro- 
politan water and sewerage board, shall, within four months 
after the acceptance of the award, file with the court objection 
to carrying on the work, it shall not be begun until the objec- 
tion be withdrawn, but if no such objection be filed, or be filed 
and withdrawn within one year thereafter, the clerk of the court 
shall notify the parties thereof, and the work shall thereupon 
proceed as hereinbefore provided. The metropolitan water and ^SmSensation 
sewerage board shall pay the compensation and expense of the and expense of 

° r j r tr commission, 

commission as approved by the court, and during and after the etc - 
completion of the work shall keep the channels, conduits and 
culverts in repair and pay the expense thereof, and the com- 
pensation and expenses so paid shall be assessed and repaid as 
the expense of construction is to be repaid. 

Section 6. The other expenses incurred in carrying out the Metropolitan 
provisions of this act shall be paid by the Commonwealth, and 
the treasurer and receiver general shall, from time to time, on 
request of the board, issue and sell notes, bonds or scrip of the 
Commonwealth to an amount not exceeding two hundred and 
twenty-five thousand dollars, designated on the face thereof, 
Metropolitan Water Loan, and use the proceeds to meet said 
expenses and to meet the interest and sinking fund requirements 
of the loan until the award has been accepted, and the provisions Certain pro- 
of chapter four hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the year to apply. 
eighteen hundred and ninety-five and acts in amendment thereof 
and in addition thereto shall, so far as they may be applicable, 
apply to said loan. 

Section 7. The cities of Maiden and Melrose shall respec- Payment of 
tively pay to the treasurer of the Commonwealth each year the 



268 



MKTROPOUTAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



\ ssessmenl 
ami collection 
oi betterments. 



When to take 
effect. 



Interest and sinking fund requirements of such part of the loan 
aforesaid as shall be equal to the amount of said expenses which 
the cities respectively are required by the award to pay, and the 
interest and sinking fund requirements of the remainder of the 

loan shall be paid by all the cities and towns in the metropolitan 
water district, as other expenses of the water works are paid. 

Section 8. The commissioners shall, within six months after 
the completion of the work of construction, if in their opinion 
any land receives a benefit from the improvement authorized by 
this act beyond the general benefit to all land in said cities, 
determine the value thereof, and assess upon the land a propor- 
tional share of the cost of such improvement, not exceeding the 
value of the benefit ; and any party so assessed may have the 
amount of the assessment determined by a jury of the superior 
court of the county in which the land is situated, under the pro- 
visions, so far as they may be applicable, of chapter fifty of the 
Revised Laws, but without interest or costs, if the assessment 
is not less than the amount determined by the jury, and the 
assessment shall constitute a lien upon the land assessed until 
paid. Every such assessment shall be certified by the clerk of 
said court to the collector of the 'city in which the land lies, and 
collected by him in the manner provided for the collection of 
taxes, and the proceeds thereof shall be paid to the treasurer 
of the Commonwealth and used to meet the interest and sinking 
fund requirements of the loan authorized by this act. 

Section 9. Except as otherwise provided herein this act 
shall take effect upon its passage. [Approved June, 3, 1904. 



R. l. 9, § 7, 
amended. 



Report of 
metropolitan 
water and 
sewerage 
board. 



[Chapter 410.] 

An Act relative to the printing and distribution of certain 

public documents. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section seven of chapter nine of the Revised Laws is hereby 
amended as follows : — . . . By striking out the words " forty- 
five hundred ", in the one hundred and eighteenth line, and in- 
serting in place thereof the words : — six thousand, — so that 
the paragraph beginning with the one hundred and eighteenth 
line will read as follows : — Of the metropolitan water and sew- 
erage board, six thousand copies. [Approved June 5, 1904. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 269 

[Chapter 426.] 

An Act relative to the apportionment of the annual 
assessments required for the construction and mainte- 
nance of the metropolitan "water system. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

The treasurer and receiver general of the Commonwealth, for Apportion- 

° ment of annual 

the purpose of making the apportionment to the cities and towns assessments 

v r , - f° r construe- 

in the metropolitan water district of the amount required in tion and main- 

. . tenance of the 

each year to pay the interest, sinking fund requirements and metropolitan 
• . , . . „,, ,., water system. 

expenses of maintenance and operation or the metropolitan 

water system provided for by section nineteen of chapter four 
hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hun- 
dred and ninety-five, as amended by chapter four hundred and 
eighty-nine of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and one, 
shall, in the year nineteen hundred and six and in each year 
thereafter, apportion to the city of Boston the proportion of such 
amount which the valuation of that city for the preceding year 
bears to the total of all such valuations of all cities and towns 
in said water district: provided, however, that there shall be in- Proviso. 
eluded only one fifth of the total valuation of every such city 
and town which has not reached the safe capacity of its present 
sources of supply in a dry year or of the sources of supply of 
the water company by which it is supplied, as determined by the 
metropolitan water and sewerage board and certified to said 
treasurer, or which has not made application to said board for 
water ; and the remainder to the other cities and towns in said 
district, one third in proportion to their respective valuations 
for the preceding year and the remaining two thirds in propor- 
tion to the consumption by the cities and towns respectively in 
the preceding year of water received from all sources of supply 
as determined by said board and certified to said treasurer, in- 
cluding however only one fifth of the total valuation and not 
including any consumption of water for an}^ such city or town 
which has not reached the safe capacity of its present sources 
of supply or of the sources of supply of the water company by 
which it is supplied as aforesaid, or which has not made appli- 
cation to said board for water ; and provided, further, that any Proviso, 
city or town assessed upon its full valuation which obtains a 
part of its water supply from its own works or receives a supply 
from a water company shall be allowed and credited in its ap- 
portionment with a sum equal to twelve dollars for each million 
gallons of water furnished as aforesaid, as determined by said 



270 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Payment ot 

assessments. 



Approval of 
certain official 

bonds. 



Compensation 
for damages 
occasioned 
in town of 
Boylston by 
the construc- 
tion of tbe 
metropolitan 
water system. 



Proviso. 



Certain rules 
and regulations 
not to consti- 



board and certified to said treasurer. The treasurer shall in 
each year notify each city and town of the amount of its assess- 
ment, and the same shall be paid by the city or town into the 
treasury of the Commonwealth at the time required for the pay- 
ment and as part of its state tax. [_ Approved June 4, 1904. 



[Chapter 431.] 

An Act relative to the approval of certain official bonds. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. The official bonds given by persons designated 
to receipt for advances of money by the metropolitan park com- 
mission and the metropolitan water and sewerage board, which 
have heretofore been approved by the auditor of accounts, shall 
hereafter be approved by the treasurer and receiver general. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved June 4, 1904. 



[Chapter 436.] 

An Act relative to compensation for damages occasioned 
in the town of boylston by the construction of the 
metropolitan water system. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. The owner of any real estate situated in that 
part of the town of Boylston on the southerly and southeasterly 
side of the metropolitan water basin known as the Wachusett 
reservoir, and within the limits of the Nashua river watershed, 
not taken but directly or indirectly decreased in value by reason 
of chapter four hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and ninety-five and amendments thereof, en- 
titled "An Act to provide for a metropolitan water supply", 
or by the doings of the metropolitan water board or of the 
metropolitan water and sewerage board thereunder, shall have 
the same right to damages for such decrease in value, to be de- 
termined and recovered in the same way, as is provided for 
owners of certain real estate in the town of West Boylston by 
section fourteen of said chapter : provided, that the petition re- 
quired by said section is filed within two years after the passage 
of this act ; but no owner shall have the right to surrender his 
real estate to the Commonwealth in the manner provided in said 
chapter. 

Section 2. The rules and regulations of the state board of 
health or of the metropolitan water and sewerage board now or 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 271 

hereafter in force for the sanitary protection of water or sources tute an element 

^ of damage. 

of water supply shall not constitute an element of damage within 

the meaning of this act. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

[Approved June #, 1904. 



[Chapter 457.] 

An Act to authorize the town of revere to supply itself 

with water. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : * 

Section 1. The town of Revere may supply itself, its in- Town of Revere 

may supply 

habitants and such inhabitants of the town of Saugus as are itself, its in- 

. habitants and 

now supplied with water or may hereafter make application to certain inhabit- 

, ,. , . , ,, .. -x- « ants of Saugus 

be supplied with water under the provisions of section seven or with water. 
chapter three hundred and eighty-two of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and eighty-nine, with water for the extin- 
guishment of fires and for domestic and other purposes, obtain- 
ing the same from the metropolitan water supply district, as May obtain 
provided in chapter four hundred and eighty-eight of the acts metropolitan 
of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-five and acts in amend- 
ment thereof and in addition thereto, may establish fountains May establish 

* hydrants, etc., 

and hydrants and relocate or discontinue the same, and may regulate the 

use of water, 

regulate the use of such water and fix and collect rates to be etc. 
paid for the use of the same. 

Section 2. Said town for the purposes aforesaid may hold May hold and 

11 J convey water 

and convey the water to be furnished by the metropolitan water furnished by 

^ ^ metropolitan 

supply district as hereinbefore provided, and may also take, by water-supply 

purchase or otherwise., and hold all lands, rights of way and May take and 

easements necessary for holding, storing, purifying and pre- ° an s ' e c * 

serving such water and for conveying the same to any part of 

said town ; may erect on the lands thus taken or held proper 

dams, reservoirs, buildings, fixtures or other structures ; may 

make excavations, procure and operate machinery, and provide 

such other means and appliances as may be necessary for the 

establishment and maintenance of complete and effective water 

works ; may construct and lay conduits, pipes and other works, 

under and over any lands, water courses, railroads, railways or 

public or private ways, and along any such way in such manner 

as not unnecessarily to obstruct the same ; and for the purpose 

of constructing, maintaining and repairing such conduits, pipes 

or other works, and for all proper purposes of this act, said 

town may dig up any such lands, and may enter upon and dig 

up any such ways in such manner as to cause the least hindrance 



272 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Proviso. 



Land of Com 
monwealtb not 
to !"• used, etc. 



to public travel thereon. The title to all laud taken or pur- 
chased under the provisions of this act shall vest in said town, 
and the land so taken may be managed, improved and controlled 
by the board of water commissioners hereinafter provided for, 
in such manner as they shall deem for the best interests of said 
town : provided, that nothing in this section shall be construed 
as authorizing said town to acquire, enter upon or make use of 
land of the Commonwealth in said town for saitf purposes, unless 
the consent of the officers of the Commonwealth having control 
of such land has first been obtained. 



Payment of 
loan, etc. 



Payment to 
metropolitan 
water board 
included. 



Section 6. The town shall provide at the time of contract- 
ing the loan for such annual proportionate payments thereof as 
will extinguish the same at maturity, and after the town has 
passed a vote to that effect the sums required for this purpose 
and for payment of interest on the loan shall be assessed -and 
collected annually in the same manner in which other taxes are 
assessed and collected. The town shall also raise annually by 
taxation a sum which with the income derived from water rates 
will be sufficient to pay the current annual expenses of operat- 
ing its water works, including therein any annual payment to 
said metropolitan water board. 



Powers and 
duties. 



Payment to 
metropolitan 
water board to 
be included 
in expense 
account. 



Section 10. Said commissioners shall fix such prices or rents 
for the use of water as shall produce annually as near as may 
be a net surplus over operating expenses, including therein any 
annual payment to said metropolitan water board, and interest 
charges equal to two per cent of the total amount of the bonds, 
notes or scrip issued under this act, after paying all current 
expenses of operating the water works, and interest upon loans, 
and after payment of all expenses of new construction not ex- 
ceeding three thousand dollars in any one year after the original 
construction. The net surplus aforesaid shall be paid into the 
treasury of the town. Said commissioners shall annually ren- 
der an account of all their doings, and shall be governed by the 
provisions of section fifteen of chapter twenty-seven of the 
Revised Laws and acts in amendment thereof and in addition 
thereto, except as otherwise provided herein. 



When to take 
effect, etc. 



Section 12. This act shall be submitted to the voters of said 
town at any annual town meeting or at a special meeting duly 
called for the purpose, at which the check list shall be used, 
and it shall take effect upon its acceptance by two thirds of the 
voters present and voting thereon at any such meeting. If the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOAED. 273 

act is accepted at an annual town meeting, the water commis- 
sioners herein provided for may be elected at the same meeting. 
[Approved June 9, 1904. 



McCarthy 



RESOLVES. 

[Chapter 28.] 

Resolve to provide for the payment of a sum of money 
from the metropolitan sewerage loan to hannah m. 
mccarthy. 

Resolved, That there be allowed and paid out of the Metro- Hannah m. 
politan Sewerage Loan authorized by section fourteen of chapter 
four hundred and twenty-four of the acts of the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-nine, the sum of seven hundred and fifty 
dollars, to Hannah M. McCarthy, widow of Patrick D. McCarthy 
who was killed on the twenty-sixth day of May in the year 
nineteen hundred and two by an accident in a metropolitan 
sewer in Roxbury, while in the discharge of his duties as an 
employee of the metropolitan water and sewerage board. [Ap- 
proved March 31, 1904. 



[Chapter 98.] 

Resolve to provide for the appointment of a committee 
to investigate the local sewerage systems within the 
metropolitan sewerage district. 

Resolved, That the governor, with the advice and consent of -^^^1 cer- 
the council, is hereby authorized to appoint a committee of taiJ i^^ e Iff G 
three persons, of whom one shall be a member of the metropoli- appointment, 
tan park commission, one a member of the Charles River basin 
commission, and one a member of the board of harbor and land 
commissioners, and of whom one shall be designated by the 
governor as chairman. The said committee shall investigate 
the extent, condition and usefulness of the sewerage systems of 
the cities and towns within the metropolitan sewerage district, 
but not now included in the metropolitan sewerage system, and 
especially shall ascertain whether or not any parts of such local 
sewerage systems should, in their judgment, be purchased and 
maintained by the metropolitan water and sewerage board. The 
members of the committee shall serve without compensation, 
and shall report to the next general court on or before the fif- 
teenth day of January in the year nineteen hundred and five. 
[Approved June 3, 1904. 



Index to Legislation of the Year 1904 



AFFECTING THE 



METKOPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



A. 

ADVANCES. Chap. Beet, 

bonds to secure, from Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, treasurer to 

approve, 431 1 

AGREEMENT. 

confirmation of, between Marlborough and Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 

Board, 299 1 

ANNUAL REPORT. 

appropriation for printing, etc., of, 30 1 

copies of, number of, increased, 410 

statistics in, as to printing of 388 2 

APPORTIONMENTS. 

See Assessments. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

annual report, for printing, etc., of, 

North Metropolitan System of Sewage Disposal, for maintenance of, 
South Metropolitan System of Sewage Disposal, for maintenance of, 
extension of High-level Sewer, for expenses of location, etc., of, 
High-level Sewer, for construction of, 



30 


1 


62 


1 


60 


1 


230 


2 


246 


1 



ASSESSMENTS. 

apportionment of, how made, 426 

credit to cities, etc., in, for water furnished, as to, 426 

AWARDS. 

Boards to make, for property taken or injured, .317 1 

B. 

BONDS, COUPON AND REGISTERED. 
See Metropolitan Sewerage Loan. 

BONDS. SURETY. 

approval by treasurer of, for advances, 431 1 

contractors to give, for labor and material, 349 1 

BOSTON HARBOR. 

pipes, etc., through, Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board may conduct, . 273 1 

BOYLSTON. 

real estate in, damages for decrease in value of, 436 1 



276 METBOPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



c. 

CITIES AND TOWNS. Chap. Sect, 

apportionment of assessments, for expenses of water works, .... 426 

CIVIL SERVICE. 

persons employed under rules of, removals, etc., regulated, .... 314 1, 2 

COMMITTEE. 

appointment of, to investigate local sewerage systems, . . Resolves, 98 

CONTRACTS. 

provisions as to preferment of citizens to be in 311 

D. 

DAMAGES. 

Boylston real estate, for depreciation of, 436 1 

eminent domain, etc., for, to property, 317 1 

petitions for, and offers of surrender, time for filing of, extended, . . . 186 1 

E 

EMINENT DOMAIN. 

damages for property taken by, as to, 317 1 

EMPLOYEES. 

citizens of Commonwealth, to be preferred as, 311 

civil service, as to removal, etc., of, 314 1,2 

H. 

HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSION. 

pipes, etc., through tide-water and Boston harbor, to approve of, . . . 273 1 

HIGH-LEVEL SEWER. 

extension of, for relief of Charles River valley, as to location, etc., of, . . 230 1 

expense of determination of, . . . . 230 2 

additional loan for construction of, 246 1 

L. 

LABOR. 

citizens to be preferred in employment of, 311 1 

protection of persons furnishing, as to, 349 1 

M. 

MARLBOROUGH. 

agreement of, with Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, confirmed, . 299 1 

MATERIALS OR LABOR. 

protection of persons furnishing, as to, 349 1 

McCarthy, hannah m. 

payment to, from Metropolitan Sewerage Loan, . . . Resolves, 28 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE LOAN. 

addition to, for expenses of location, etc., of extension of High-level Sewer for 

relief of Charles River valley, 230 2 

addition to, for expense of construction of High-level Sewer, .... 246 1 
payment from, to Hannah M. McCarthy Resolves, 28 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 277 

METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. Chap. Sect. 

agreement of, with Marlborough, confirmed, 299 1 

High-level Sewer for relief of Charles River valley, to determine lines, etc., of, 230 1 

local sewerage systems, as to purchase, etc., of, by, . . . Resolves, 98 

Revere, may furnish water to, 457 1 

Spot Pond Brook, to improve, etc., 406 1-9 

tide-water, etc., may carry pipes, etc., over or under, 273 1 

N. 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM OF SEWAGE DISPOSAL. 

appropriation for operation, etc., of, 62 1 

P. 

PETITIONS. 

time of filing of, for damages and offers of surrender, extended, . . . 186 1 
time of filing of, for damages to Boylston real estate, as to, . . . 436 1 

R. 

REAL ESTATE. 

Boylston, in, damages for decrease in value of, 436 1 

damages to, by taking, etc., as to 317 I 

REGULATIONS AND RULES. 

sanitary, etc., as to damages from enforcement of, 317 1 

sanitary, etc., as to enforcement of, in Boylston, . ... 436 2 

REVERE. 

town of, may supply itself with water, 457 1 

S. 

SAUGUS. 

water to, Revere may furnish, 457 1 

SEWERAGE SYSTEMS. 

for investigation of, committee appointed, Resolves, 98 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM OP SEWAGE DISPOSAL. 

appropriation for operation, etc., of, .60 1 

SPOT POND BROOK. 

improvement of, by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, . . . 406 1-9 

STATISTICS. 

printing of, in reports, as to, 388 2 

SURRENDER. 

offers of, time for filing, extended, 186 1 

real estate in Boylston, owners of, shall not have right to, .... 436 1 

T. 

TIDE WATER. 

pipes, etc., through, Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board may conduct, . 273 1